Using Bolt Battery as home emergency backup - Chevy Bolt EV Forum
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post #1 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-08-2017, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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Using Bolt Battery as home emergency backup

I saw a different thread on this, but then I read this article on Wired (sorry I cant post links) about people using the Leaf for backup during hurricane Sandy.
I would never touch the 480v battery, but this is essentially using the car's own protections and 480->12v conversions to run some stuff from the home. Anyone understand enough about how the Bolt charges its own 12v battery and the limits to the that hardware. Could this work in a pinch? All these hurricanes have me worried and prepping...
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post #2 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 01:23 AM
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12 v inverter - unto 1500 watts should be no problem according to a Chevy tech video - the Bolt will "back feed" the 12 volt battery at 1600 watts - clamp a 12v DC to AC converter onto the 12 volt battery and you should be fine - I ran a few AC devices via this inverter to try it out…there isn't a lot of experience with this so far - so be careful and don't come to me if there are any problems.

But this particular unit is now permanently in the trunk of my Bolt…

BESTEK 2000W Power Inverter 3 AC Outlets 12V DC to 110V AC Car Inverter

1500 watts is more than enough to run wifi, charge tablets/phones, and keep a home fridge running (although the fridge will take most of the 1500 watts when it's running).
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post #3 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 02:27 AM Thread Starter
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thanks for guinea pigging yourself. Does the bolt recharge the 12V even when off or do you need to have the car running or something? I don't even know if there is an accessory mode on this thing.
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post #4 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 08:05 AM
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thanks for guinea pigging yourself. Does the bolt recharge the 12V even when off or do you need to have the car running or something? I don't even know if there is an accessory mode on this thing.
I haven't gotten that far - never needed to run it that long so far - worse case - turn the Bolt on, turn off climate control and the radio and just leave it be while you siphon electrons from the 12 volt battery.
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post #5 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 08:16 AM
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Nissan has developed a http://blog.nissan-global.com/EN/?p=4866Leaf to Home converter that is available in Japan. The 24 Kwh battery is enough for 2 days or so based on the Japanese living a much more frugal (energy wise) lifestyle than Americans. It probably won't get through 1 day here before you would need to drive it to a charging station that still had power to top it off again. It's certainly viable and I bought my Leaf second hand on the cheap thinking someday it would be my "powerwall".
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post #6 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 08:24 AM
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using the Bolt for AC power comes from this thread - and video

https://www.chevybolt.org/forum/10-te...t-systems.html

the relevant portion of the video the discusses this usage is at 10:50 time stamp mark - NOTE: the Chevy representative says it "should work" but "does not sanction" that type of use. So your milage may vary YMMV - don't come to me if there are problems.
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post #7 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 08:27 AM
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I haven't gotten that far - never needed to run it that long so far - worse case - turn the Bolt on, turn off climate control and the radio and just leave it be while you siphon electrons from the 12 volt battery.
Whether the car is "running" or not, how long will it last? Can we simply divide 60 kW by 1500w to get 40 hours (not counting for efficiency loss)?
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post #8 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 08:32 AM
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thanks for guinea pigging yourself. Does the bolt recharge the 12V even when off or do you need to have the car running or something? I don't even know if there is an accessory mode on this thing.
having an EV "on/running" is really no big deal - since 98% of the battery load comes from the AC/induction motor - which only draws power while it's actually moving - there is virtually NO issue to leaving the car "on/running" in park with the parking brake

turn off the climate control, turn off the radio - and I'm pretty certain the Bolt would sit there almost indefinitely at the sort of electrical loads a non-moving Bolt draws…

we all have to remember 60 kWh - is a _LOT_ of power, an embarrassing amount of power actually -

"In 2015, the average annual electricity consumption for a U.S. residential utility customer was 10,812 kilowatthours (kWh), an average of 901 kWh per month. Louisiana had the highest annual electricity consumption at 15,435 kWh per residential customer, and Hawaii had the lowest at 6,166 kWh per residential customer."

source - https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=97&t=3

60 kWh of power will run the average US household for 5 1/2 days…

the Bolt uses next to nothing if you turn off cabin heating/cooling and it isn't moving under it's own power.

with a 1,500 watt inverter with a. 10% conversion loss - can run from 60 kWh for 36 hours of continuous load. Even a fridge only used 3-4 kWh/day - cause it's not always on.
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post #9 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-09-2017, 08:38 AM
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but if you're in "hilltop reserve mode" - your at 88% capacity when "fully" charged

60 * .88 = 52.8 kWh sitting in the battery…

10% conversion loss from the inverter

52.8 * .9 = 47.52 kWh consumption possible

average US household = 47.54 / 10.182 = /10.182 = 4.66 days of electrical use

47.54 kWh at 1.5 kWh continuous load = 31.7 hours of back up power - I would venture that you'd get a solid 48 hours of usage out of Bolt if you're running stuff off a 1500 watt 12v DC inverter.

thus making the Bolt a reasonable short term power solution and an awesome camping machine, truly awesome for tail gating if you want AC power.

it's interesting to note that 1500 watts is just about the amount of power on a typical US household 120v/15 amp circuit - 120 volts * 15 amps = 1800 watts.
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post #10 of 130 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 12:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David M O'Rourke View Post
"In 2015, the average annual electricity consumption for a U.S. residential utility customer was 10,812 kilowatthours (kWh), an average of 901 kWh per month...."

60 kWh of power will run the average US household for 5 1/2 days…
If the average household uses 900 kWh per month then it uses about 30kWh per day and the Bolt's battery would only last 2 days.
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