GFCI tripping with stock charger - Chevy Bolt EV Forum
User Tag List

 7Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 12:42 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 774 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
GFCI tripping with stock charger

Got my car today. Came home and hooked up to 110V garage outlet. Noticed that my GFCI had to be reset. I had found it tripped on other occasions so I just reset it and didn't think much about it. Charged for a few hours then made a trip to town and got back after dark. Decided to change my amp setting to 12 amps. Got in the house when I started hearing the car beeping. The GFCI was tripped. So I got back in the car and reset the amp back to 8 and thought that it was odd that would trip the GFCI. Then I remembered we had wiring issues after our house was built and had to have the electrician make changes. Now I think the ghosts of wiring past is haunting me. I turned the lights on in the garage and the GFCI tripped again with the setting on 8 amps. Then I unplugged the car and the GFCI tripped when I flipped the lights on. Didn't happen the first time I got home because it was during the day and I wasn't turning the lights on. Well drats. Every time the lights get turned on the GFCI trips with the charger plugged in. Doesn't matter if the car is plugged in or what the amp setting is set at. So I did what any other red blooded Bolt owner who wants his car to charge through the night, I removed the offending GFCI and have no further issues with the 12 amp setting.

Anyone have any GFCI issues with their charger?
XJ12 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 08:05 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 591
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 226 Post(s)
So you plugged into a GFCI outlet (I don't think you specified)? I think the manual warns you against doing that. In general GFCI outlets are quirky, and at any rate they don't like high current loads and will trip, buzz or have other oddball behavior. Plug it into a non GFCI. The car already has it's own GFCI onboard.
ProfessorBolta is offline  
post #3 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 774 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfessorBolta View Post
So you plugged into a GFCI outlet (I don't think you specified)? I think the manual warns you against doing that. In general GFCI outlets are quirky, and at any rate they don't like high current loads and will trip, buzz or have other oddball behavior. Plug it into a non GFCI. The car already has it's own GFCI onboard.
All standard garage outlets are required to be on a GFCI. At least in my state's electrical code. I haven't read the NEC code book in awhile but thought it is required in lower 48 at least. There's one GFCI outlet in the circuit so all outlets are protected. So any plug in my garage, outdoors, kitchen, and bathrooms are on GFCI. My issue occurred even when the car wasn't plugged in, just the L1 EVSE. So current draw didn't appear to be a factor. And the garage lights are on a different circuit to boot. I do have all the four foot fixtures converted to electronic ballasts with LEDs. Too much noise on the ground? Note: car did make it through the night on 12 amps after removing the GFCI from the circuit. So I'm all smiles this AM
XJ12 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 10:24 AM
Senior Member
 
surgeonFWW's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Huntington, WV
Posts: 1,100
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 454 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to surgeonFWW
Outlets for Level 2 EVSE (excludes the provided 120 volt EVSE with 12 amp max) are supposed to be on a dedicated circuit with its own (40 amp, usually) breaker. There ARE GFCI circuit breakers, but none of the EVSE installations of which I am aware require you to use a GFCI breaker. You said one outlet in the existing garage circuit has the GFCI and feel that even if you run an individual circuit to a dedicated EVSE outlet, that TOO has to have GFCI. If that is the law, I do not know how to do it without breaking the law, but there must be a way. The outlet for my EVSE had to be installed at least 48 inches above the ground. Could the height of the outlet be a factor?

Rick's blue Bolt
surgeonFWW is offline  
post #5 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 11:25 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Every state is different, but I know my home (GA) our garage has 2 outlets and both have a GFCI. Our house also have outlets outside. One GFCI is also wired for the backyard and the Front are wired to the other GFCI. I would see what other appliances are wired in to that circuit. Phantom GFCI trips are more frequent the more outlets are wired to the circuit (or so Google says). So I would start to find some of the home wiring suspect.

We are lucky that the breaker box is in the garage so we are just adding a 240V outlet made even easier by replacing our range and clothes dryer with gas (plenty of free space and load on the panel). If we were not adding a Level 2, we were going to add a dedicated 120V outlet for the L1 charger. This would at least reduce the risk of the GFCI tripping.
ferrari1898 is offline  
post #6 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 02:48 PM
Senior Member
 
DucRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Oregon
Posts: 860
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 310 Post(s)
It might be that the GFCI outlet itself is bad.

Try replacing it with another one, and if the behavior continues you likely have a wiring problem that should be addressed. Noise on the ground should not affect a GFCI (a GFCI will operate properly on a circuit without a ground at all). It only compares the hot and neutral legs - if the difference is >5mA, the GFCI will trip.

Given the wiring problems you had with the house, it is possible that the neutral on the GFCI circuit is shared with at least one other circuit (garage lights?) "downstream" of the GFCI. Some electricians routinely tie all the neutrals together that enter a box (maybe the box for the garage light switch?), but GFCI circuits need to be kept separate.

If a shared neutral is the root of the problem, running without GFCI will work, but keep in mind there is a very good reason certain outlets are required to be protected.
rgmichel and ibboltin like this.

Gary
2018 Honda Clarity Electric
2014 Honda Fit EV - goodbye after 5 years
(Re)Lease expires Jan 2019
NDEW City Captain

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Oregon Electric Vehicle Association (OEVA)

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
DucRider is online now  
post #7 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 02:54 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 774 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
My furnace in the garage gets around the GFCI requirements by having a dedicated circuit and a special plug that prevents someone using it with residential electric appliances.
XJ12 is online now  
post #8 of 36 (permalink) Old 10-27-2017, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 774 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DucRider View Post
Given the wiring problems you had with the house, it is possible that the neutral on the GFCI circuit is shared with at least one other circuit (garage lights?) "downstream" of the GFCI. Some electricians routinely tie all the neutrals together that enter a box (maybe the box for the garage light switch?), but GFCI circuits need to be kept separate.
I suspect you're correct. I'll probably try a new GFCI as their inexpensive. Glad I opened the GFCI up as one of the hot wires pulled out. My new car may have prevented a serious issue with an improperly tightened terminal. Now I wonder about the rest of the house.
XJ12 is online now  
post #9 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-09-2017, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,157
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 774 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DucRider View Post
It might be that the GFCI outlet itself is bad.

Try replacing it with another one, and if the behavior continues you likely have a wiring problem that should be addressed.
An update: Now that I've installed a dedicated 240V circuit for the car, I revisited the GFCI issue. I installed a new GFCI and it solved the original problem. Works without issue. So it was a bad GFCI. Also bought a $10 circuit tester to verify wiring was correct.
XJ12 is online now  
post #10 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-29-2017, 12:45 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Also having trouble with charger cord trip GFCI breaker

I have been having trouble with my Bolt's factory 120 volt EVSE cord tripping the CFCI breaker in my garage about one in three times when I connect the cord's J1772 connector to the scoket on the car. The car is set to pull 12 amps, and the car charger is the only thing plugged into the circuit, which has a 20 amp breaker at the main panel. The GFCI is contained in one of the garage outlets. The EVSE cord normally stays plugged in all the time. It seems the CFCI usually trips immediately or within a few minutes of connecting to the car. I have verified the socket on the car is not damp with water.

I previously had a Nissan LEAF with a 120 volt EVSE cord that appeared to be made by Aerovironment. The LEAF charged at 12 amps and never tripped the GFCI in the four years I had the LEAF. Unfortunately, the LEAF's EVSE cord was sold with the car, so I have only the Chevy (appears to be made by Clipper Creek) available for testing.

I am planning to give Chevrolet a call to ask about the problem. Has anybody else who has had problems with the Bolt's included 120 volt EVSE cord tripping GFCIs been able to find a resolution? Electical code requires the garage outlets to be GFCI protected, so removing the GFCI is not an allowable option.

Last edited by BillM; 11-29-2017 at 12:54 AM.
BillM is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome