Charging Fails. Battery Too Hot. What's Happening Here? - Chevy Bolt EV Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 01:19 AM Thread Starter
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Charging Fails. Battery Too Hot. What's Happening Here?

I was at an EVGO station today and had a first take place in my 5 mos of ownership. After two or three minutes of charging at 110A (GOM showed 60 miles of range) the charger stopped, displaying a CHARGING FAILED, BATTERY TOO HOT message.

It was probably the hottest day I had ever fast charged the car. Ambient temps were into the 90s. Torque showed battery temp around 95F.

I reset the charger and repeated. Same error. OK. Now had 90 miles of range so I drove to another EVGO charger (there was only one station available at the location where the error occurred). Ambient was down to 69F. Battery temp was only slightly cooler at around 90F. Charging session went fine. No errors (100 amp charge, which was charger's max).

But now I'm wondering what the anatomy of this problem was. I tend to think it was a problematic charger, but I have no knowledge of what data is shared between the car and the charger at a DCFC. The charger seemed to be acting like it got data from the car that that the battery was too hot and to shut down. First, is that level of telemetry possible? If so is it using the J1772 protocol to pass the traffic? Wait. There MUST be a data exchange. At least one way (car to charger) because charge rate is based partially on battery temp. Not to mention SOC. Right?

But if so, why didn't the car simply tell the charger to slow the rate of charge?

My best guess therefore, since the subsequent charger worked in similar conditions, is that, YES, the car can tell the charger its battery is too hot, but in this case the charger may have read a signal that the car had not sent. I mean the battery temp (which I've never paid much attention to) was still 86F later on when ambient was 59F.

Can anyone either confirm my theory or cure my ignorance?
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 06:06 AM
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I can't answer your questions but I would check the high voltage battery coolant reservoir level to make sure there isn't a leak.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 02:53 PM
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GM, are you listening? We need the ability to condition the battery on demand. If the car doesn't have the ability to know when a charging session is coming up, allow the operator to do so.

I've seen videos of people driving their cars with a laptop through the OBD port. Wonder if one could take command of their car to condition the battery. At least fake the system out with a false battery temperature.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Coastal_Cruiser View Post
I was at an EVGO station today and had a first take place in my 5 mos of ownership. After two or three minutes of charging at 110A (GOM showed 60 miles of range) the charger stopped, displaying a CHARGING FAILED, BATTERY TOO HOT message.

It was probably the hottest day I had ever fast charged the car. Ambient temps were into the 90s. Torque showed battery temp around 95F.
Something seems odd. I have seen DC chargers overheat, and shut down, from clogged up air filters at the back of the unit not allowing the fan to pull enough air through, but have never seen the car battery too hot to charge. I had no idea the car sent that level of information to the charger. My understanding was it only requests, and should receive, the current level the car asks for.

You have Torque Pro. Once the battery temp reached the low 90's you should have seen the AC compressor spool up, the battery coolant temp start dropping, and possibly the charge rate throttle back until the battery temperature drops.
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 12:22 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by PhilBo View Post
I can't answer your questions but I would check the high voltage battery coolant reservoir level to make sure there isn't a leak.
Thanx for taking the time to post that illustration. I checked and battery coolant level is spot on.
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 12:29 AM Thread Starter
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You have Torque Pro. Once the battery temp reached the low 90's you should have seen the AC compressor spool up, the battery coolant temp start dropping, and possibly the charge rate throttle back until the battery temperature drops.
I hadn't noticed, so maybe it did, but I didn't hear the compressor running while I was stopped and trying to charge. Will keep an ear out in the future.

For the moment I'm still leaning on toward the fluky charger theory. But I have to call EVGO tomorrow anyway and will ask them about the message.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 03:41 AM
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When the car compressor/HVAC system kicks on, it's fairly noticeable. A distinct noise. Other ambient noises around may mask it, but pop the hood if you are around it next time. It'll be obvious. You have a tool to help, better yet, but it is a distinct noise and I can hear the fluids pumping. In the public setting, I would imagine it's tougher to hear.

This is a little left field; when I take long drives in the Bolt on the weekends typically (100-140 miles). I drive the Bolt hard. When I get home, I deliberately don't plug in for 2+ hours. My simple thinking is let the battery cool down on it's own or through whatever process the car acts upon. Then give it a charge. I know, everyone says trust in GM, they programmed the system to do it right. I am just thinking that a cooler battery is a happier battery. And, I have the time, there's no urgency for me to 'plug in' ASAP.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 04:23 AM
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When the car compressor/HVAC system kicks on, it's fairly noticeable. A distinct noise.
Yeah, yhen it starts up, it is quite loud. I heard it for the first time when DC (not so fast) charging on a "25 kW" https://www.chargepoint.com/products/commercial/cpe100/. I'd started at 37% SoC and it kicked on once I reached 75% SoC or so.

As posted at http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopi...59905#p559905:
"At some point after 75% or so SoC (still going at full speed), I heard my car's thermal management kick in, a first for me. It's fairly loud and sounds weird. I opened the hood could feel a ton of hot air entering the "engine" compartment due to the fans pulling air thru the radiator.

Outside air temps were below 70 F at the time."

Before this, DC charging was pretty quiet, just like L2 charging is normally pretty quiet.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Coastal_Cruiser View Post
I hadn't noticed, so maybe it did, but I didn't hear the compressor running while I was stopped and trying to charge. Will keep an ear out in the future.

For the moment I'm still leaning on toward the fluky charger theory. But I have to call EVGO tomorrow anyway and will ask them about the message.
It is pretty loud, but you don't need to hear it. You have a PID for AC compressor on Telek's list.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-25-2019, 12:24 AM Thread Starter
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This is a little left field; when I take long drives in the Bolt on the weekends typically (100-140 miles). I drive the Bolt hard. When I get home, I deliberately don't plug in for 2+ hours. My simple thinking is let the battery cool down on it's own or through whatever process the car acts upon. Then give it a charge. I know, everyone says trust in GM, they programmed the system to do it right. I am just thinking that a cooler battery is a happier battery. And, I have the time, there's no urgency for me to 'plug in' ASAP.
I see. But may I test that theory? What makes you think the battery is/may be hot after the drive? High ambients? Hot from discharging? Have you ever checked battery temp after such a run?

I'm not inquiring because you should trust GM, but rather I'm wondering if a Hard run really heats up the battery much?

:>

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