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Confused. Are you saying the adapter I linked to wouldn't work with the juicebox? Or are you saying it'd be a waste of money and that it would be better to find a 5-15R to TT-30P adapter and use that with the EVSE that comes with the car to plug in if that's your only option? Just curious because I've come across the TT-30 receptacles a couple times and been unable to take advantage.

Also, I understand that the standard RV adapter for TT-30 to Nema 14-50 is wired differently than what the juicebox or other EVSE is expecting (because it's expecting two hots in different phases and that's not how the standard RV adapters are wired), but I'm curious why you say "you can't have an adapter" instead of "a better idea would be x".
Here's wikipedia about the TT-30 connector. It's 120V at 30 amps.

The Bolt will only draw 12A if it sees 120V, so you're no better than plugging your stock EVSE into a regular household outlet (NEMA 5-15, 15A, 120V). Either way, you'll charge at 1.44 kW and get about 4 miles for each hour of charging.

If you just wanted to take just one EVSE with you and it has a NEMA 14-50 plug on it, an adapter would allow you to plug it in to a TT-30 and give you the same performance as the stock adapter in a household outlet. So it wouldn't necessarily be a waste of money. But you'd probably be better of bringing a NEMA 5-15 to NEMA 14-50 adapter though, since you'd get the same performance and probably see more 120V outlets you could plug into, since regular household outlets are much more common than TT-50 outlets.
 

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You can't have an adapter from a TT-30 to a NEMA 14-50 because TT-30 is only 120V. A TT-30 plug is basically no better than a regular household plug for Bolt owners.
Well, you can... If your EVSE can handle switching from Level 1 to 2 or vice versa. My OpenEVSE custom build (got the controller and sourced the rest of the parts, case included) uses the Hubble Twist lock plugs to custom made plugs so I can swap out plugs to various styles. The controller automatically senses Level 1 or 2 and I can set the current for the charge via wifi to my phone.:D

Now, as for the TT-30, well, that leave you stuck at Level 1, but at the camp ground that should at least get you a bit of range overnight, better than nothing.
 

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Confused. Are you saying the adapter I linked to wouldn't work with the juicebox? Or are you saying it'd be a waste of money and that it would be better to find a 5-15R to TT-30P adapter and use that with the EVSE that comes with the car to plug in if that's your only option? Just curious because I've come across the TT-30 receptacles a couple times and been unable to take advantage.

Also, I understand that the standard RV adapter for TT-30 to Nema 14-50 is wired differently than what the juicebox or other EVSE is expecting (because it's expecting two hots in different phases and that's not how the standard RV adapters are wired), but I'm curious why you say "you can't have an adapter" instead of "a better idea would be x".
Here's a good chart.



It shows the TT-30 has 1 hot and 1 neutral with ground. You only get 120 so the Bolt will only charge at 120V 12A or Level 1. Sloooow.
 

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Well, you can [have a TT-30 adapter.] If your EVSE can handle switching from Level 1 to 2 or vice versa. My OpenEVSE custom build (got the controller and sourced the rest of the parts, case included) uses the Hubble Twist lock plugs to custom made plugs so I can swap out plugs to various styles. The controller automatically senses Level 1 or 2 and I can set the current for the charge via wifi to my phone.:D

Now, as for the TT-30, well, that leave you stuck at Level 1, but at the camp ground that should at least get you a bit of range overnight, better than nothing.
Sure, lots of EVSEs (including my JuiceBox) can plug in at 120V and you can even tell them to advertise the full 24A you could (continuously) draw from a TT-30, but the Bolt won't care — if it sees 120V it'll lock it down to 12A (or 8A if you don't fix the setting).

Thus a way to plug your Bolt into a TT-30 outlet is less useful than an adapter to plug it into a standard 120V 15A NEMA 5-15, since you'll find those everywhere (including camp grounds) and either one will give you the exact same charging speed.
 

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Sure, lots of EVSEs (including my JuiceBox) can plug in at 120V and you can even tell them to advertise the full 24A you could (continuously) draw from a TT-30, but the Bolt won't care — if it sees 120V it'll lock it down to 12A (or 8A if you don't fix the setting).

Thus a way to plug your Bolt into a TT-30 outlet is less useful than an adapter to plug it into a standard 120V 15A NEMA 5-15, since you'll find those everywhere (including camp grounds) and either one will give you the exact same charging speed.
Yes, and I acknowledged that in my post about the 12A at 120V. Depending on where the 120V 5-15 plug might be you can plug into that, but having the adapter doesn't hurt. Charging speed wise, it doesn't really help you either, but again, overnight who really cares if it gets you enough range to go to a fast charger in the morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
My OpenEVSE custom build (got the controller and sourced the rest of the parts, case included) uses the Hubble Twist lock plugs to custom made plugs so I can swap out plugs to various styles.
Not all of us are wizzards, Cataract2. Some of us are just 1st year Harry Potters.
 

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Yes, and I acknowledged that in my post about the 12A at 120V. Depending on where the 120V 5-15 plug might be you can plug into that, but having the adapter doesn't hurt. Charging speed wise, it doesn't really help you either, but again, overnight who really cares if it gets you enough range to go to a fast charger in the morning.
Here's a pretty typical campground outlet that includes a NEMA 14-50



and here's one without



@pfrost may have had the unfortunate experience of having only a TT-30 and nothing else, but from googling campsite images, that looks pretty uncommon.

If you do want an adapter to plug into a TT-30 for those rare campsites that only provide that plug, this $6.50 one that turns it into a regular household (NEMA 5-20) outlet is probably the best one to get. (In fact, despite my earlier words, it's so small and cheap that it seemed like a no brainer to just buy, just in case!)

FWIW, in my trunk I have the stock EVSE, an adapter that lets me plug it into a NEMA 14-20/30/50 plug (it has no bottom pin, so it fits in any of these), and then an adapter for a NEMA 10-30 (to NEMA 14-50). These mean that I can plug it into 240V at a camp ground, but also into anyone's dryer outlet to give me about 100 miles in overnight charging.
 

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Thanks, Cataract2, for the chart. That's very helpful. Hmm, I wonder if TT-30 are particular to Canadian campgrounds or also throughout the USA. Presumably, these plug-in issues will diminish as the EVSE network expands. Meanwhile, I hope I don't get stuck plug-less at a campground. Thanks all for the discussion.
 

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Not all of us are wizzards, Cataract2. Some of us are just 1st year Harry Potters.
Of course, I wasn't expecting one to build that. Just was pointing out options. Never know who might be a crazy DIYer willing to take on the challenge. Besides, everyone has to start as a 1st year Hogwarts student.
 

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Here's a pretty typical campground outlet that includes a NEMA 14-50



and here's one without



@pfrost may have had the unfortunate experience of having only a TT-30 and nothing else, but from googling campsite images, that looks pretty uncommon.

If you do want an adapter to plug into a TT-30 for those rare campsites that only provide that plug, this $6.50 one that turns it into a regular household (NEMA 5-20) outlet is probably the best one to get. (In fact, despite my earlier words, it's so small and cheap that it seemed like a no brainer to just buy, just in case!)

FWIW, in my trunk I have the stock EVSE, an adapter that lets me plug it into a NEMA 14-20/30/50 plug (it has no bottom pin, so it fits in any of these), and then an adapter for a NEMA 10-30 (to NEMA 14-50). These mean that I can plug it into 240V at a camp ground, but also into anyone's dryer outlet to give me about 100 miles in overnight charging.
Interesting. I've seen camp grounds that only had the 14-50 with a disconnet, but the one with multiple options I have not. What you have is like mine. These are things that I wish dealerships or even that info was more readily available for those who don't know to look could easily find or learn. That way no one gets caught out in the cold.
 

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Just ordered the $6.50 adapter from amazon - cheap insurance...
Exactly! I was saying “you'll probably never need this”, but when I saw it was $6.50 and pretty small, it seemed dumb not to have one just in case.

(My expectation is to never use the stock charger and adapter cables that sit in the bottom of our Bolt's trunk.)
 

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BTW, the graph you show here is a reasonably good copy of the 100A line from this one by @Zoomit:

... and this graph is a clear indication of why long distance travel is not and never will be a viable option in a BEV. 80% of the people who drive cars, are not going to commit this information to memory so that they can drive (still inconveniently btw) long distances.
 

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... and this graph is a clear indication of why long distance travel is not and never will be a viable option in a BEV. 80% of the people who drive cars, are not going to commit this information to memory so that they can drive (still inconveniently btw) long distances.
Yes, that's right. In @KeithMoon's world, the Tesla long-distance charging network sits completely unused. And the fact that you can drive from the Bay Area to Los Angeles in a current Tesla Model S without stopping to charge at all is irrelevant because lots of people want to drive more than six hours without stopping at all.

More seriously, you don't need to memorize the charging graphs. If you're planning a long trip, your trip planner will tell you when and where to charge and for how long.

If you want a car that has no prospects for long-distance travel, it'd be a fuel-cell car. If you want to drive from SF to Portland Oregon, you're out of luck.
 

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More seriously, you don't need to memorize the charging graphs. If you're planning a long trip, your trip planner will tell you when and where to charge and for how long.
This is exactly right. There are plenty of route planners out there. The Chevy App "works", but it's currently terrible. (FWIW, Tesla's integrated planner is much better). PlugShare has a trip planning tool. A Better Route Planner is also pretty good, although a recent update seems to have made it worse for the Bolt.

If DCQCs were more common, you could basically drive until you get the "low battery charge" light, and find a nearby charger. Then just charge to 80% (the car will tell you how long that takes - no graphs to memorize). Will we get there? I don't know. Until we do, a little bit of planning goes a long way.
 

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Vertiformed, I'm a bit of a dunce. What does the chart above show? Without a "time" element, I can't read the darn thing.


Oh, for the record; a gentleman I know at our EV club in Tucson drives his model S (Tesla) from Tucson to LA, twice a week. He charges it up twice, but told me he doesn't really have to do that, as a single charge would also work out for him.


I will add that my Bolt is in MA. I'd like to buy an EV for my AZ (south of Tucson) home. I have relatives in San Diego, and, with the current charger infrastructure, such a trip, in a non-Tesla EV, would be impractical.


Rich
 

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Vertiformed, I'm a bit of a dunce. What does the chart above show? Without a "time" element, I can't read the darn thing.
Telling you the kW basically tells you the charging speed. The faster the charging speed the better. The take-away from these graphs is that if your car is at 75%, it will be charging slowly, if it is at 20% it will be charging as fast as it can.

If you want an easier graph, here's one for pulling into a charger and how long it'll take to get to different battery percentages.



There are more graphs in this thread.

Oh, for the record; a gentleman I know at our EV club in Tucson drives his model S (Tesla) from Tucson to LA, twice a week. He charges it up twice, but told me he doesn't really have to do that, as a single charge would also work out for him.

I will add that my Bolt is in MA. I'd like to buy an EV for my AZ (south of Tucson) home. I have relatives in San Diego, and, with the current charger infrastructure, such a trip, in a non-Tesla EV, would be impractical.
Perhaps today it is impractical, but in a few month's Electrify America's network will be fully operational (much by July, all by the end of the year). Here's the network:



It still might be more convenient to have a Tesla (or something else that fast charges faster than a Bolt), but it will certainly be very possible to drive a Bolt, and depending how you like to drive such trips, possibly quite practical too.
 
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