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Maintenance schedule for your 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

Service schedule shows a list of services required starting from 7,500 miles to 150,000 miles

Required services for the Chevy Bolt includes tire rotations, replacement of the compartment air filter and drain and fill vehicle coolant circuits.



Additional Maintenance / Care for your 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

Other recommended services and care for the Chevy Bolt includes alignment, battery care, brakes, fluids, hoses, lights, multi-point vehicle inspection, tires, windshields and wiper blades.

 

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Oh man that is a grueling schedule!! Those cabin filters can be a *****!! If you don't change them, first you'll have to suffer from dirty outside air and then they become clogged and you can suffocate! ;)

I swear they invented those filters just to give their dealers a service item to charge for. For decades cars never had them and we all survived.

The rest of the maintenance items is just boiler plate that they hand out with all their cars. I like the part about maintaining the battery so it can "crank the engine".

Which does bring up a point. I'm sure the Bolt has a lead acid 12v battery that runs the various systems. I wonder if it's recharged by an alternator that spins off the motor, or some kind of transformer from the vehicle battery. Does it get charged when you plug the car in at night? Is it a deep cycle battery since there is no cranking involved?

This battery is not on the list of maintenance items, but I guarantee you, it will need replacing at some point. Oh the horrors of the EV!! :D
 

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So basically, barring repairs, you don't need to go back to the dealer until 150,000 miles....as the other stuff you can DIY. You may even be able to DIY the fluid flush if you're capable.

Lol
True, but the first 2 service visits are included (does not include air filters). Basically 2 free tire rotations......
 

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Can the warranty be voided if the service schedule is not followed?
Yes, but the work does not have to be performed by a dealer.

Do I have to use the dealer for repairs and maintenance to keep my warranty in effect?
No. An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0138-auto-warranties-routine-maintenance#do
 

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Can the warranty be voided if the service schedule is not followed?
It should be since certain issues can happen due to a lack of maintenance or at least that's what they will say.

Overall that's how it goes, as long as you do the maintenance and have it documented your it the clear.

No reason not to follow the maintenance schedule.
 

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Oh man that is a grueling schedule!! Those cabin filters can be a *****!! If you don't change them, first you'll have to suffer from dirty outside air and then they become clogged and you can suffocate! ;)

I swear they invented those filters just to give their dealers a service item to charge for. For decades cars never had them and we all survived.
I dunno about you, but I like having cleaner air in the cabin. Have you ever changed one of those filters and seen how much dirt and dust can accumulate? It's a lot, and just think, in an older car you would've been breathing that in every day.

Lots of things cars have today we made do without back in the day. But that doesn't mean those things aren't useful now. Personally, I change the filter myself. Takes all of 5 minutes, and costs maybe $15 for the part.

[/QUOTE]The rest of the maintenance items is just boiler plate that they hand out with all their cars. I like the part about maintaining the battery so it can "crank the engine".

Which does bring up a point. I'm sure the Bolt has a lead acid 12v battery that runs the various systems. I wonder if it's recharged by an alternator that spins off the motor, or some kind of transformer from the vehicle battery. Does it get charged when you plug the car in at night? Is it a deep cycle battery since there is no cranking involved?

This battery is not on the list of maintenance items, but I guarantee you, it will need replacing at some point. Oh the horrors of the EV!! :D[/QUOTE]

There's an inverter (converter?) that takes the high-voltage coming off of the big battery and steps it down to 12V to run all of the 12V systems (radio, internal/external lights, displays, alarm, power locks/windows, etc), which also serves to recharge the 12V battery. It should get recharged when you plug-in at night. I know that on my PiP that's what happens when I plug it in. The 12V battery is likely good for much longer than 4 or 5 years. It might even be a life-of-the-vehicle item. The 12V battery on my 2005 Prius made it to 9 years on the original battery.
 

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There's an inverter (converter?) that takes the high-voltage coming off of the big battery and steps it down to 12V to run all of the 12V systems (radio, internal/external lights, displays, alarm, power locks/windows, etc), which also serves to recharge the 12V battery. It should get recharged when you plug-in at night. I know that on my PiP that's what happens when I plug it in. The 12V battery is likely good for much longer than 4 or 5 years. It might even be a life-of-the-vehicle item. The 12V battery on my 2005 Prius made it to 9 years on the original battery.
Is there really? I don't know. Many of the BEVs I have had a look under the hood had a standard lead acid 12v battery. I assumed the Bolt too. I wanted to find out this issue for sure when I went to the LA auto show, they refused to let me open the hood for some reason for some reason.
 

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EVs use a device called a "DC-DC Converter" to keep the 12 volt accessory battery charged. It takes high voltage from the pack and steps is down to about 14.3 volts, which is fed to the (usually lead-acid) 12 volt battery. They are used on everything from electric motorscooters to full-sized electric cars. The charging algorithm (programmed instructions) for the Nissan leaf is inadequate for some driving patterns, but most EVs (and PHEVs like the PIP) seem to do fine with this setup. Ironically, the regular Prius tends to "eat" accessory batteries...
 

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EVs use a device called a "DC-DC Converter" to keep the 12 volt accessory battery charged. It takes high voltage from the pack and steps is down to about 14.3 volts, which is fed to the (usually lead-acid) 12 volt battery. They are used on everything from electric motorscooters to full-sized electric cars. The charging algorithm (programmed instructions) for the Nissan leaf is inadequate for some driving patterns, but most EVs (and PHEVs like the PIP) seem to do fine with this setup. Ironically, the regular Prius tends to "eat" accessory batteries...
My 2005 Prius seems to be the exception to that rule, then. Lasted 9 years before it finally had to be replaced (by which time my son owned the car).
 

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I wonder if the 12v battery is commonly available, or it's some hard to find battery unique to this car? I also wonder if the car can function off this DC transformer that charges the 12v battery should it fail while driving?
 

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I wonder if the 12v battery is commonly available, or it's some hard to find battery unique to this car?
Yes, it will be a commonly available battery.

I also wonder if the car can function off this DC transformer that charges the 12v battery should it fail while driving?
Pg 118 of the owners manual:
Charging System Light
(12-Volt Battery)
The charging system light comes on
briefly when the vehicle is started,
as a check to show the light is
working.
If the light stays on, or comes on
while driving, there could be a
problem with the electrical charging
system. Have it checked by your
dealer. Driving while this light is on
could drain the 12-volt battery.
If a short distance must be driven
with the light on, be sure to turn off
all accessories, such as the radio.
No different than an ICE car. You can likely drive with a "dead" battery - but when you go to start again.....
The battery doesn't need to crank an ICE, but still needs to power all the computers, gauges, etc.
 

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Yes, it will be a commonly available battery.


Pg 118 of the owners manual:

No different than an ICE car. You can likely drive with a "dead" battery - but when you go to start again.....
The battery doesn't need to crank an ICE, but still needs to power all the computers, gauges, etc.
But what I'm wondering is opposite. What if the charging system is working perfectly, but the 12v battery fails? Can the charging system keep the car going until you get to a safe destination? Probably so I imagine.
 

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But what I'm wondering is opposite. What if the charging system is working perfectly, but the 12v battery fails? Can the charging system keep the car going until you get to a safe destination? Probably so I imagine.
If the setup is similar to the Spark EV, I don't think the lead-acid battery does anything when the main power systems of the car are operational. It's pretty much a backup battery for when the car is turned off. This is one reason these batteries tend to last a very long time.

I guess I could do the experiment and find out whether the car will start if I disconnect the lead-acid battery. FWIW, it looks like a small, run-of-the-mill sealed, lead-acid car battery to me.
 

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The Bolt is a nearly maintenance-free car, the dealerships won't be happy selling them since they won't be making much, if any, money off of vehicle maintenance. Older cars generally costs more over time, replacement parts, general upkeep and such. I've been hit with a few shocking bills from the dealership over the years and I'll be glad to see them gone.
 

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I always wondered how they make money off of the EVs after sales. Selling you tires and windshield wipers...?
They don't make much, that's why they are resisting them. Their business models will have to adjust in the coming future. Much like the corner gas stations have switched from service and repair to mini marts, dealerships of the future may have to be mostly new and used sales, maybe wash and detail places, custom speed shops, large charging stations and perhaps more comprehensive repair, like collision repair.

They have options. They'll just have to down side one side of the business and upsize something new. Besides, Have always heard that they make most their money these days on used cars and there will still be those.
 
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