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"At least twice a year, have
underbody flushing service
performed."

Can't I just hose the underside?
Pretty much. I can't imagine them doing it in any fancy way or anything. This is from the manual as well

At least twice a year, spring and fall,
use plain water to flush any
corrosive materials from the
underbody. Take care to thoroughly
clean any areas where mud and
other debris can collect.
 

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Found this online when I was going through stuff.
my.chevrolet.com / content/dam/gmownercenter/gmna/dynamic/manuals/2017/Chevrolet/BOLT%20EV/Owner's%20Manual.pdf

Me Like

Remove the spaces, this board wouldn't allow me to post a link.
Great find - thank you!
 

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Here's a disturbing bit from the manual, posted in the Leaf forum:

(page 322)
...Like all batteries, the amount of
energy that the high voltage
“propulsion” battery can store will
decrease with time and miles
driven. Depending on use, the
battery may degrade as little as
10% to as much as 40% of capacity
over the (8 years or 100,000 miles) warranty period.
If there
are questions pertaining to battery
capacity, a dealer service technician
could determine if the vehicle is
within parameters..."

So 40% capacity loss will be considered "normal" and won't trigger a pack replacement under warranty.
[/COLOR]
 

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Guess they're trying to make up for it with two years of free roadside service. Now that the battery degradation percentage has been raised, more people will try to lease one instead of buy one and after a few years, dealerships will have an excess amount of used Bolts sitting around.
 

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Here's a disturbing bit from the manual, posted in the Leaf forum:

(page 322)
...Like all batteries, the amount of
energy that the high voltage
“propulsion” battery can store will
decrease with time and miles
driven. Depending on use, the
battery may degrade as little as
10% to as much as 40% of capacity
over the (8 years or 100,000 miles) warranty period.
If there
are questions pertaining to battery
capacity, a dealer service technician
could determine if the vehicle is
within parameters..."

So 40% capacity loss will be considered "normal" and won't trigger a pack replacement under warranty.
[/COLOR]
Tesla battery warranty:
The Battery, like all lithium-ion batteries, will experience gradual energy or power loss with time
and use. Loss of Battery energy or power over time or due to or resulting from Battery usage, is
NOT covered under this Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.
Pg 5
https://www.tesla.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/Model_S_New_Vehicle_Limited_Warranty_201602_en_NA.pdf
 

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Here's a disturbing bit from the manual, posted in the Leaf forum:
(page 322)
...Like all batteries, the amount of
energy that the high voltage
“propulsion” battery can store will
decrease with time and miles
driven. Depending on use, the
battery may degrade as little as
10% to as much as 40% of capacity
over the (8 years or 100,000 miles) warranty period.
If there
are questions pertaining to battery
capacity, a dealer service technician
could determine if the vehicle is
within parameters..."

So 40% capacity loss will be considered "normal" and won't trigger a pack replacement under warranty.
[/COLOR]
Yes, but hit 41% degradation, and boom! New battery for you!

I doubt anyone will ever get close to 40%...unless they are trying to purposely damage their battery. Or it is being used for commercial purposes (and hits the DCFC multiple times a day).
 

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Guess they're trying to make up for it with two years of free roadside service. Now that the battery degradation percentage has been raised, more people will try to lease one instead of buy one and after a few years, dealerships will have an excess amount of used Bolts sitting around.
{rubbing hands} That would be great news for me! My current EV lease runs for another 2 years and I'll probably buy a 3-4-year-old used one for 'around town'. In 2020 buying a used, 3 year old Bolt at $10K would not bother me at all (caveat actual battery longevity/fade data garnered over the next 3 years).
 

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I doubt anyone will ever get close to 40%...unless they are trying to purposely damage their battery. Or it is being used for commercial purposes (and hits the DCFC multiple times a day).
Heh. So said Leaf owners, circa 2011.
 

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The result of years of use on thousands of Volts has shown GM's wise decision from Day 1 to thermally regulate the battery pack. Nissan chose the quick and dirty path and got burned (literally and figuratively) by that. I have 40k+ miles on our 2014 Volt and we get 48 - 50 miles every day (not bad since the 2014 MY Volt was rated at 38 miles!) Check out Voltstats.net... Volts with hundreds of thousands of miles and those owners are saying the same thing... extremely reliable!

I am SO not worried about my Bolt's battery life. That said, I did lease our Bolt... in a few years I get to order Gen 2 Bolt as a replacement with 300 miles of range!

:)
 

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The result of years of use on thousands of Volts has shown GM's wise decision from Day 1 to thermally regulate the battery pack.
I'm sure this is a direct result of the investment that GM made in its battery testing lab. That's why I believe they've done similar testing with the Bolt's battery and why I have a pretty high degree of confidence in its durability. It's not just because the Bolt uses thermal management and a battery technology similar to the Volt - its because GM is earning a reputation for putting in the effort required to engineer these things properly.
 

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The result of years of use on thousands of Volts has shown GM's wise decision from Day 1 to thermally regulate the battery pack. Nissan chose the quick and dirty path and got burned (literally and figuratively) by that. I have 40k+ miles on our 2014 Volt and we get 48 - 50 miles every day (not bad since the 2014 MY Volt was rated at 38 miles!) Check out Voltstats.net... Volts with hundreds of thousands of miles and those owners are saying the same thing... extremely reliable!

I am SO not worried about my Bolt's battery life. That said, I did lease our Bolt... in a few years I get to order Gen 2 Bolt as a replacement with 300 miles of range!

:)
I'm Red Fury on Voltstats (#5 for active total miles right now). I've surpassed 177,000 miles in my 2011 volt. Battery still gives me 30+ miles electric (in normal conditions) and almost all of my driving is highway. I'd say that's a very minimal amount of range loss due to battery degradation.
 

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Battery degradation

I leave hilltop reserve on all the time unless I'm heading out on a long trip. I keep hearing that not charging to 100% will lengthen battery life? Is this an urban lesson? thanks
 

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It won't hurt, and it might help a bit - not a lot. Hilltop does help on regen tho - full regen isn't available until < 95%, and I find having a variable amount of regen confusing and maybe dangerous. I also use hilltop unless I know I will need that last 10-12%. Very frequent DCFC is probably going to hurt the battery more than routine 100% with L2 or L1.
 

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I leave hilltop reserve on all the time unless I'm heading out on a long trip. I keep hearing that not charging to 100% will lengthen battery life? Is this an urban lesson? thanks
It will almost certainly help preserve usable battery capacity over the long term. Exactly how much it will help we don't know because the Bolt's battery is relatively new but all Lithium Ion batteries share similar characteristics including that charging to a high state of charge (and maintaining a high state of charge) will cause "wear" on the battery and over time will cause the battery to lose usable capacity.

Every Lithium Ion battery chemistry has slightly different characteristics but the general rule of thumb is to try to keep your battery SoC between about 20% and about 70%. There's no easy way to do this with the Bolt but even charging to ~90% (what you get with Hilltop Reserve) will definitely provide a benefit over charging to 100%

One thing I do when charging at home to try to get around the lack of options for setting a maximum charge setting in the car is to use departure mode charging and tell the car I'm leaving 2 hours later than I actually am. This allows me to interrupt the charge before it gets to ~90% "full". There are some disadvantages to this though as if you never let the car charge to 'full" the car won't be able to balance the cell voltages like it normally does at the very tail end of a charge cycle and if you're in a very hot environment (over 95F) the car won't initiate battery cooling until the charge cycle is complete. For this reason I generally let it charge to "full" when it's very hot out and I also allow it to charge to full about every 3-4 charge cycles for the cell-balancing benefit.

If you don't want to be all OCD about your battery like I am my advice is to leave hilltop reserve on and don't charge until you get to about 40% battery unless you need more than that on a regular basis.

If you're looking for a lot of more info on this here are some more links.

https://www.teslarati.com/top-5-tips-to-maintaining-ev-battery/
https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries
https://electrek.co/2017/09/01/tesla-battery-expert-recommends-daily-battery-pack-charging/
 
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