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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, I am sorry if this has been discussed. I have searched and read a lot, but can't seem to find what I need. Or, I am slow and just haven't put it together yet in my head. I have an un-used dryer outlet (NEMA 10-30) and will have the OEM charge cord coming with the Bolt that I am getting. For now, this is what I am hoping to use to charge the Bolt at my home. Will this work and if so, what adaptor do I need to get this to work?

Thanks is advance and again, sorry for the NOOB question that has prolly been answered countless times.
 

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You want something like this. Caveat: I have no experience with this item, and I'm pretty sure it violates the electrical code in some way. Nonetheless, if I were in your position, I'd gladly use it or make my own. Make **** sure no one plugs anything else into this adaptor.

 

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So, first understand some basics. a 30A circuit can handle no more than a 24A sustained load. The stock cord is 12A maximum whether used on 120V (as it is designed to use) or with 240V with an adapter (essential a hack).

Given the EPA rating of ~4 mi/kWh efficiency of the Bolt, and with the various options up to 24A, here is roughly how much charge would be added in a 10 hour overnight charging session:
120V 8A (Bolt default) - .96kW or slightly less than 1 kWh per hour, slightly under 4 miles per hour of charging. Cost of equipment - $0
120V 12A (toggle on the energy screen) - 1.44kW or slightly less than 1.5kWh per hour or 5-6 miles per hour of charging. Cost of equipment - $0
240V 12A (with OEM cord + adapter) - 2.88kW or slightly less than 3kWh per hour, about 12 miles of range per hour of charging. Cost - <$50
240V 24A (need to buy an EVSE) - 4.888kW or slightly less than 5 kWh per hour, about 20 miles per hour of charging. Cost >$200

So, over 10 hours, 40, 50-60, 120, 240 miles of range added overnight for the 4 options above respectively.

Winter driving tends to be less efficient, so drop each of these by 20-40% to err on the safe side.

Now, consider your daily driving. Match your need in miles to the above. If you can get by with 120 miles in overnight charging and don't mind doing the hack of making (or perhaps buying) an adapter, you would be golden. If your overnight need is more, don't skimp, buy the right equipment for the job.

Here is a site that discusses the hack: CarCharging.us

Word of caution: This is a hack, though as the articles explain, the cord is capable of 240V. So, proceed at your own risk. Clearly mark your adapter as being for EV charging only, and perhaps even get a locking device to make sure nobody plugs a 120V appliance into your adapter unless you really, really like fireworks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You only need to replace the power that you use each day. How far do you drive?
I'll be driving 115 miles daily and will also be charging at work, but not sure what that is yet, but I believe only Level 2.
 

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I'll be driving 115 miles daily and will also be charging at work, but not sure what that is yet, but I believe only Level 2.
8 hours on a 6.6 kW EVSE would be about 50 kWh, and will likely completely fill you up well before your shift ends. If the EVSE has more power than that, even faster.
 

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Being able to charge at work, especially if it's free, is the ultimate jackpot for those who have trouble with getting L2 charging working in their home. Some simple theoretical scenarios, assuming it's roughly 60 miles each way in 70F weather.
  1. Monday - Leave work for the day with an 80% charge / roughly 210 miles on your dash (do your math on this, in general EVs should only go to 100% when you need it for long term battery health)
  2. Arrive at work with 150 miles left, plug in
  3. Leave work with 80%/210 miles on your dash (pretty much any L2 charge will get you to 80% provided you work an 8 hour day)
  4. Arrive home with 150 miles left, plenty of juice for anywhere you'd want to go on a weeknight
  5. Tuesday-Thursday repeat the above, arriving to work with 50-90 miles depending on whether or not you ran any errands and leaving each work day with 80%
  6. Friday - When you get home, plug in the L1 charger which should make you 80% by the time you wake up in the morning for the weekend. (assuming a 1.1kW charge rate, ~4 miles per hour)
As long as you have a DC FC station close by you can always go there if you need to interrupt the above with a road trip. Just one of many options. You should be wary if you live in a cold weather environment, math changes drastically and looks more like the below in 20F.

  1. Leave an 80% / 150 mile range on your dash
  2. Arrive at work with 80-90 miles remaining
  3. Leave work with an 80% / 150 mile
  4. Arrive home with 80-90 miles -plug in the L1 charging at home-
  5. Leave home with 80% charge
So if you live in cold climate, I personally would charge L1 in winter temps every night but otherwise enjoy the free work juice.

Bottom line is even in winter you may not even need that dryer socket, at all.

If you have to pay for the juice at work and own your home I would honestly ignore the dryer plug (assuming it's over 20' away) and look into getting an electriction to run something proper. Just get it done right and over with, one time expense, you're still likely saving a ton of money over your previous ICE, it sucks but it likely could be worse (I had to pay $3k to get it to my detached garage)
 

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I'll be driving 115 miles daily and will also be charging at work, but not sure what that is yet, but I believe only Level 2.
It its level 2 at work you should be ok to only charge at work. However...If you are going to use the heater both directions you will be hard pressed to make the round trip and stay with in the charge limitations.
 

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You only need to replace the power that you use each day. How far do you drive?

Plug your data into this link. Electric car charging cost and time calculator

I am not sure which charger you are getting. Some new Bolts have a dual voltage charger with special adapters to match to power.
Not sure that 120v EVSE is doing its job at -25c today.The charge that i put in every night might not equal the charge used to keep the battery fron freezing.I suspect that my Bolt will start a few times in the night to keep that battery warm.So does the 120v EVSE supply enought power to compensate?
 

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Not sure that 120v EVSE is doing its job at -25c today.The charge that i put in every night might not equal the charge used to keep the battery fron freezing.I suspect that my Bolt will start a few times in the night to keep that battery warm.So does the 120v EVSE supply enought power to compensate?
It's better than leaving it unplugged, where the battery heater will just drain your battery without any power from the wall.
 

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It's better than leaving it unplugged, where the battery heater will just drain your battery without any power from the wall.
I agree.My point was that i would be more confident if my supplied EVSE was on 240v this way i would allways be on 12A.at double the rate.Also not sure that on 120v when i remote start for 10 minutes my 120 EVSE is taking my house current
 

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I agree.My point was that i would be more confident if my supplied EVSE was on 240v this way i would allways be on 12A.at double the rate.Also not sure that on 120v when i remote start for 10 minutes my 120 EVSE is taking my house current
The 2.88 kW using the stock cord on 240V would still not keep up with battery and cabin conditioning. Battery conditioning, sure and some headroom for the HV battery too. But it would be 2X as helpful as standard L1 charging.
 

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I have a question I feel like I should already have the answer to, which is does the BMS run more agressively when attached to the grid? Any difference between L1/L2 DCFC?
 

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First, I am sorry if this has been discussed. I have searched and read a lot, but can't seem to find what I need. Or, I am slow and just haven't put it together yet in my head. I have an un-used dryer outlet (NEMA 10-30) and will have the OEM charge cord coming with the Bolt that I am getting. For now, this is what I am hoping to use to charge the Bolt at my home. Will this work and if so, what adaptor do I need to get this to work?

Thanks is advance and again, sorry for the NOOB question that has prolly been answered countless times.
Since you already have a 240 volt outlet (the hard part), why not just buy a level 2 evse? They are relatively inexpensive, and gives you the option for daily mileage of the entire range of ~240.

I opted for a 40A evse. Even though a 2017-21 Bolt maxed level 2 charge rate is 32A, I plan to charge electric cars going forward, after the Bolt. Even a 2022 Bolt can now charge at a higher level than 40A.

I look at it this way, I bought an over 200-mile range EV. I might as well have the infrastructure to use the car to it’s limits, rather than my limited ability to re-charge it.
 

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First, I am sorry if this has been discussed. I have searched and read a lot, but can't seem to find what I need. Or, I am slow and just haven't put it together yet in my head. I have an un-used dryer outlet (NEMA 10-30) and will have the OEM charge cord coming with the Bolt that I am getting. For now, this is what I am hoping to use to charge the Bolt at my home. Will this work and if so, what adaptor do I need to get this to work?

Thanks is advance and again, sorry for the NOOB question that has prolly been answered countless times.
FYI


ga2500ev
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Since you already have a 240 volt outlet (the hard part), why not just buy a level 2 evse? They are relatively inexpensive, and gives you the option for daily mileage of the entire range of ~240.

I opted for a 40A evse. Even though a 2017-21 Bolt maxed level 2 charge rate is 32A, I plan to charge electric cars going forward, after the Bolt. Even a 2022 Bolt can now charge at a higher level than 40A.

I look at it this way, I bought an over 200-mile range EV. I might as well have the infrastructure to use the car to it’s limits, rather than my limited ability to re-charge it.
Makes sense, but I am in a rental and everything has to go through the landlord first. Was just looking for an immediate fix once the Bolt gets here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Being able to charge at work, especially if it's free, is the ultimate jackpot for those who have trouble with getting L2 charging working in their home. Some simple theoretical scenarios, assuming it's roughly 60 miles each way in 70F weather.
  1. Monday - Leave work for the day with an 80% charge / roughly 210 miles on your dash (do your math on this, in general EVs should only go to 100% when you need it for long term battery health)
  2. Arrive at work with 150 miles left, plug in
  3. Leave work with 80%/210 miles on your dash (pretty much any L2 charge will get you to 80% provided you work an 8 hour day)
  4. Arrive home with 150 miles left, plenty of juice for anywhere you'd want to go on a weeknight
  5. Tuesday-Thursday repeat the above, arriving to work with 50-90 miles depending on whether or not you ran any errands and leaving each work day with 80%
  6. Friday - When you get home, plug in the L1 charger which should make you 80% by the time you wake up in the morning for the weekend. (assuming a 1.1kW charge rate, ~4 miles per hour)
As long as you have a DC FC station close by you can always go there if you need to interrupt the above with a road trip. Just one of many options. You should be wary if you live in a cold weather environment, math changes drastically and looks more like the below in 20F.

  1. Leave an 80% / 150 mile range on your dash
  2. Arrive at work with 80-90 miles remaining
  3. Leave work with an 80% / 150 mile
  4. Arrive home with 80-90 miles -plug in the L1 charging at home-
  5. Leave home with 80% charge
So if you live in cold climate, I personally would charge L1 in winter temps every night but otherwise enjoy the free work juice.

Bottom line is even in winter you may not even need that dryer socket, at all.

If you have to pay for the juice at work and own your home I would honestly ignore the dryer plug (assuming it's over 20' away) and look into getting an electriction to run something proper. Just get it done right and over with, one time expense, you're still likely saving a ton of money over your previous ICE, it sucks but it likely could be worse (I had to pay $3k to get it to my detached garage)
I live in Vegas, so not to cold overall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Being able to charge at work, especially if it's free, is the ultimate jackpot for those who have trouble with getting L2 charging working in their home. Some simple theoretical scenarios, assuming it's roughly 60 miles each way in 70F weather.
  1. Monday - Leave work for the day with an 80% charge / roughly 210 miles on your dash (do your math on this, in general EVs should only go to 100% when you need it for long term battery health)
  2. Arrive at work with 150 miles left, plug in
  3. Leave work with 80%/210 miles on your dash (pretty much any L2 charge will get you to 80% provided you work an 8 hour day)
  4. Arrive home with 150 miles left, plenty of juice for anywhere you'd want to go on a weeknight
  5. Tuesday-Thursday repeat the above, arriving to work with 50-90 miles depending on whether or not you ran any errands and leaving each work day with 80%
  6. Friday - When you get home, plug in the L1 charger which should make you 80% by the time you wake up in the morning for the weekend. (assuming a 1.1kW charge rate, ~4 miles per hour)
As long as you have a DC FC station close by you can always go there if you need to interrupt the above with a road trip. Just one of many options. You should be wary if you live in a cold weather environment, math changes drastically and looks more like the below in 20F.

  1. Leave an 80% / 150 mile range on your dash
  2. Arrive at work with 80-90 miles remaining
  3. Leave work with an 80% / 150 mile
  4. Arrive home with 80-90 miles -plug in the L1 charging at home-
  5. Leave home with 80% charge
So if you live in cold climate, I personally would charge L1 in winter temps every night but otherwise enjoy the free work juice.

Bottom line is even in winter you may not even need that dryer socket, at all.

If you have to pay for the juice at work and own your home I would honestly ignore the dryer plug (assuming it's over 20' away) and look into getting an electriction to run something proper. Just get it done right and over with, one time expense, you're still likely saving a ton of money over your previous ICE, it sucks but it likely could be worse (I had to pay $3k to get it to my detached garage)
Rental house, so I can't just install anything but the landlords are open to the idea. Am looking for a quick fix initially.
 
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