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How much does it cost to operate a Bolt (EUV, I have in mind, but EV's fine for answering). Know it's a fundamental question. Am a newbie to this world, coming from gas cars. Is there a cents per mile that charging equates to? Just trying to get a sense for how much charging a Bolt compares to paying for gas for ICE. I can calculate the cost per mile roughly for a gas car (price per gallon of gas factored into my gas car's MPG, and setting aside for this the cost of oil, tune-ups, tires, brakes etc.). Is charging a Bolt cheaper than fueling an ordinary gas car (say, an economy car that makes about 30 mpg)?
When I ran all the numbers, I came up with it would cost me about 1/6th what a gas car costs to operate. That’s just for the “fuel” and doesnt include oil, filters, repairs, etc. It also assumes charging at home. There are free chargers out there, but the pay to use ones cost, and that cost is similar and comparable to gasoline.

Also remember that in many ways, electric cars arent about the money. In a comparably sized small car, you might only be buying $1000 of gas per year. And such a small car might cost you much less to buy than the EV. But, for me, the torque, speed, quietness, one foot driving, and not having to go to gas stations is worth big bucks.

Old gearhead adage: if it was JUST about money, we’d all be driving 10 year old Corollas.
 

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If I unerstand this, the only way to get Adaptive Cruse Control is with the EUV and super cruise. Still no homelink. Battery and DC fast charging - no upgrade. Interior looks a lot better. Not what I was hoping for, but what I expected.

Many new cars no longer have Homelink garage door openers. It’s a perfect way for a thief to gain access to your home if your vehicle is parked outside. Remotes are cheap from Amazon and can be hidden somewhere in your car.
 

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There's a new proposal adding a $7k credit back for Tesla and GM for up to 400k new EVs.

I wouldn't wait on it considering the politics.

ga2500ev
From what I've surmised, this won't be retroactive. Ridiculous, since I just bought my Bolt 3 weeks ago.
 

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I can see myself getting into one if they sell it like 2020 premier for 24k out of the door. But paying anything more for outdated battery heat management and fast charging is no go . 11 kWh home charging is not enough to have EV that is crippled once you wanna go on long distance drive.
Having another ICE car just for that is financial suicide. This just will focus more educated EV owners to consider more expensive options like Tesla that win in every way possible and have dedicated Tesla charging network.
My Bolt is just groceries getter and for use in the winter over Tesla. But for many who think moving entirely to one EV to do all functions going to work....shopping and long travels this EV GM is trying to make you believe is not going to happen.
My 2017 Bolt EV has been "doing all functions" for over three years now. Our PHEV is only used when we need more than one car for local driving. But I just bought a Mini Cooper SE for that, so the PHEV is getting sold come springtime.

YMMV

Yes, Tesla has a better charging network and I do wish I had access to it. But CCS is sufficient now, and gets better every year. GM also announced a partnership with EVgo to install thousands more.
 

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From what I've surmised, this won't be retroactive. Ridiculous, since I just bought my Bolt 3 weeks ago.
I'm sorry about your situation, but to me it seems ridiculous to make it retroactive. The whole point is to encourage people to buy EVs, not to give them back money. You already bought, so clearly you had enough encouragement.
 

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From what I've surmised, this won't be retroactive. Ridiculous, since I just bought my Bolt 3 weeks ago.
GM has been giving a $8k discount on Bolts because the older credit had expired. It's highly unlikely they would give as generous a discount if a new federal credit were instated.
 

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Is Chevrolet's promotional offer of a level 2 outlet installed for "free" with a purchase of a Bolt EUV a bit of a red herring? The offer is good only with a purchase through June, but further offer details won't be released until the EUV is closer to available, and that going to be when? Even it's sooner than later, that doesn't leave prospective buyer much time to carefully evaluate such a significant purchase, let alone address any supply issues that Chevrolet may have in making appreciable quantities of EUVs available (lest God forbid, dealers add hefty mark-ups to the MSRP). Furthermore, isn't the case that the early EUVs won't come with the dual cable charger, meaning that if a person manages to buy a EUV in time and if she qualifies for the free level 2 outlet, and if an install of that can actually happen, she will lack the dual cable charger to take advantage of the free level 2 outlet installed at her residence?
 

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Is Chevrolet's promotional offer of a level 2 outlet installed for "free" with a purchase of a Bolt EUV a bit of a red herring? The offer is good only with a purchase through June, but further offer details won't be released until the EUV is closer to available, and that going to be when? Even it's sooner than later, that doesn't leave prospective buyer much time to carefully evaluate such a significant purchase, let alone address any supply issues that Chevrolet may have in making appreciable quantities of EUVs available (lest God forbid, dealers add hefty mark-ups to the MSRP). Furthermore, isn't the case that the early EUVs won't come with the dual cable charger, meaning that if a person manages to buy a EUV in time and if she qualifies for the free level 2 outlet, and if an install of that can actually happen, she will lack the dual cable charger to take advantage of the free level 2 outlet installed at her residence?
I get the sense it is one of those 'buzz-worthy' promotions that creates nice marketing lift for GM (and for dealers trying to convince people who are on the fence about their first EV) but isn't really a value for the customer. As you've noted, it'll be built-in to the price for as long as the promotion runs, which in this case is around launch - when people will be paying the closest to MSRP anyway.
 

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How much does it cost to operate a Bolt (EUV, I have in mind, but EV's fine for answering). Know it's a fundamental question. Am a newbie to this world, coming from gas cars. Is there a cents per mile that charging equates to? Just trying to get a sense for how much charging a Bolt compares to paying for gas for ICE. I can calculate the cost per mile roughly for a gas car (price per gallon of gas factored into my gas car's MPG, and setting aside for this the cost of oil, tune-ups, tires, brakes etc.). Is charging a Bolt cheaper than fueling an ordinary gas car (say, an economy car that makes about 30 mpg)?
Cost of electricity per kWh is what you need to know, since that can vary greatly by area, whether you charge at home or somewhere else, your home electricity use tier, and time of day.

When you know that, you can use it and your economy to figure out your cents per mile. The EPA range is based on about 4 miles/kWh, but economy can vary (can be higher if you drive economically at lower speeds a lot, but can be lower if you drive at high speeds in cold weather with the heater on).

So if your electricity costs $0.16 per kWh and you get 4 miles per kWh, your cost would be $0.04 per mile. But if your electricity costs $0.33 per kWh and you get 3 miles per kWh, your cost would be $0.11 per mile.

If your gasoline car gets 30 miles per gallon on $3 per gallon gasoline, then it costs $0.10 per mile to fuel.
 

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Cost of electricity per kWh is what you need to know, since that can vary greatly by area, whether you charge at home or somewhere else, your home electricity use tier, and time of day.

When you know that, you can use it and your economy to figure out your cents per mile. The EPA range is based on about 4 miles/kWh, but economy can vary (can be higher if you drive economically at lower speeds a lot, but can be lower if you drive at high speeds in cold weather with the heater on).

So if your electricity costs $0.16 per kWh and you get 4 miles per kWh, your cost would be $0.04 per mile. But if your electricity costs $0.33 per kWh and you get 3 miles per kWh, your cost would be $0.11 per mile.

If your gasoline car gets 30 miles per gallon on $3 per gallon gasoline, then it costs $0.10 per mile to fuel.
Thanks. Super helpful. Is the EPA range of about 4 miles/kWH specific to the Bolt?
 

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Thanks all for the scoop. Can I see if I'm following correctly? First, figure out how is the cost per kWH at my residence. Then, multiple that cost by the time that it will take to charge my Bolt. If the Bolt is near to fully depleted and will take, for instance, 6 hours to charge (just pulling a duration off the top of my head), then we would multiple the cost per KWH at my residence by 6 hours. The result would be the cost in electricity to recharge the Bolt. Correct? That raises another question I suppose: How long does it take to recharge? Is that based upon the "power" of the outlet in my residence? What if it is a 240 volt line? Does that tell us how long it would typically take to charge a Bolt?
Brad,
A simpler way is to take the battery size (60 kWh for a 2019 and before) and multiply it by your electricity rate.
Thus, as an example, 60 kWh * 0,08$ per kWh would yield a full charge costing 4,80$.

For the full charge time approximation, you take the battery size and divide it by your charger capacity (in kW).
Here, a 2019 Bolt EV connected to a 32A home charger on 220~240 volts would take:
60 kWh / (32A * 220v = 7,040 kW) = 8,5 hours.

Please note this is in perfect condition with 100% efficiency of all systems. Real life is a little more complicated.
 

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Now I have four months to decide what to get! Hopefully they will be available by the time I turn my car in.
I believe that It is fairly easy to extend the lease if it comes down to timing for you. IIRC 3 months is a "checkbox" on the return paperwork and it can be extended by another 3 months.
 

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Thanks. Super helpful. Is the EPA range of about 4 miles/kWH specific to the Bolt?
The last couple of posts get to the point of fuel cost. You were correct with your initial question many posts back, "what is my fuel cost per mile?" pack capacity just unnecessarily complicates things in my opinion

Chevy and the EPA rate the Bolt EV at 3.9mi/kWh he rounded up to 4 for easy numbers. Yes, other EVs are different, he quoted the number for the Bolt.

My personal experience, I live in upstate NY which has winter, and I drive for comfort, not optimum efficiency, so my winter number is 2 miles / kWh and summer is 4.6 miles / kWh. My lifetime average, starting in June of 2017, is 3.0 mi/kWh

When you are figuring what you pay per kWh from your utility make sure you include all taxes, tariffs, and delivery charges to arrive at your true cost per kWh delivered. I take my total electric bill, subtract my "minimum monthly connection fee" and divide that value by my kWh consumed. That number is typically 2X or more the stated cost per kWh on your bill.

So you still need to purchase tires, but that is about it, add up all the other service costs you typically pay for a ICE vehicle and you can assume you are saving those costs. My fuel cost is $0.06 per kWh / 3mi per kWh = 2.0 cents per mile.
 

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I believe that It is fairly easy to extend the lease if it comes down to timing for you. IIRC 3 months is a "checkbox" on the return paperwork and it can be extended by another 3 months.
Interesting, I didn’t know that. Hopefully it won’t matter but this is good to know. Thanks!
 

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I really wish it was an advertisement for the Bolt variations rather than being an advertisement for Disney World.

The only things I learned that I didn't already know:

Sunroof available in EUV (EUV only, not in Bolt EV)

That is it... and confirmed that Disney sucks but I already knew that so it isn't something I learned from the advertising.

Where do you see anything about 11 KW charging? I missed that.

They tried to make the EUV look like it has more ground clearance by making it with larger wheel wells... the wheel arch now intersects the charger door... and because of the larger wheel wells the wheels actually look undersized now.

They talk about how the EUV is bigger, a lot of the "visible" size difference is more space in front of the windshield... but it has the same drive train that takes up the same space as the Bolt EV, so since I didn't read anything about it having a frunk, that extra space up front is wasted space...

I am not too disappointed because we already knew that it was going to be built on old tech (slow DCFC, FWD only) so I was prepared to be underwhelmed.

Keith
I was sort of sad to see that extra length up front. I think a Frunk is a waste of space myself. Better to just be shorter for me! That's one thing that's so great about the Bolt EV, about the same interior space as a Model 3 but 2 feet shorter!
 

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The last couple of posts get to the point of fuel cost. You were correct with your initial question many posts back, "what is my fuel cost per mile?" pack capacity just unnecessarily complicates things in my opinion

Chevy and the EPA rate the Bolt EV at 3.9mi/kWh he rounded up to 4 for easy numbers. Yes, other EVs are different, he quoted the number for the Bolt.

My personal experience, I live in upstate NY which has winter, and I drive for comfort, not optimum efficiency, so my winter number is 2 miles / kWh and summer is 4.6 miles / kWh. My lifetime average, starting in June of 2017, is 3.0 mi/kWh

When you are figuring what you pay per kWh from your utility make sure you include all taxes, tariffs, and delivery charges to arrive at your true cost per kWh delivered. I take my total electric bill, subtract my "minimum monthly connection fee" and divide that value by my kWh consumed. That number is typically 2X or more the stated cost per kWh on your bill.

So you still need to purchase tires, but that is about it, add up all the other service costs you typically pay for a ICE vehicle and you can assume you are saving those costs. My fuel cost is $0.06 per kWh / 3mi per kWh = 2.0 cents per mile.
Thank you for very helpful explanation.
 

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I think the EV credit coming back is probably bad for bolt owners. The dealers started giving $7k+ point of sale incentives when the rebate went away. When it comes back these incentives will most likely disappear and then you'd have to wait til tax season to get the $ back and not everyone will get the $7500 max or whatever.
 

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I think the EV credit coming back is probably bad for bolt owners. The dealers started giving $7k+ point of sale incentives when the rebate went away. When it comes back these incentives will most likely disappear and then you'd have to wait til tax season to get the $ back and not everyone will get the $7500 max or whatever.
No worries. It's not coming back. The current political climate won't support the proposal. Treat it as an aspiration, not as a concrete piece of legislation.

ga2500ev
 

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I think the EV credit coming back is probably bad for bolt owners. The dealers started giving $7k+ point of sale incentives when the rebate went away. When it comes back these incentives will most likely disappear and then you'd have to wait til tax season to get the $ back and not everyone will get the $7500 max or whatever.
gm will adjust the Bolt price in the market to be competitive, they always have. They do so on a regional basis by zip code. In 2017 the Bolt was the only game in town as the first long range affordable EV. Going forward The Bolt and Bolt EUV will have competition AND to my surprise gm did lower the MSRP. The lower MSRP equates to lower discounts on the 2022, the Federal tax incentive translates into lower lease payments, or to compensate for having to wait for your Federal rebate just lower your withholdings to get the money now if it is that big of a deal.

While I fully agree the implementation could be better, the Federal incentive being applied at the time of purchase, just as our state credit is applied, would be ideal. It is better for gm and Tesla to have a level playing field, every manufacturer having the incentive. I only wish that it was not manufacturer specific, why penalize the front runners, just set the total $$ incentive the Federal government wants to allow for EVs and let all manufacturers compete for that money regardless of prior sales numbers.

While the incentives have been great recently, competition is even better IMHO at driving the price point.
 

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No worries. It's not coming back. The current political climate won't support the proposal. Treat it as an aspiration, not as a concrete piece of legislation.

ga2500ev
While no legislation is concrete, I would put a high probability of it being passed based on the new administration and their stated goals and objectives. What are you seeing that is leading you to be more pessimistic about it passing?
 
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