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While no legislation is concrete, I would put a high probability of it being passed based on the new administration and their stated goals and objectives. What are you seeing that is leading you to be more pessimistic about it passing?
It would require 60 votes in the Senate. That's not happening.

It's going to be a somewhat frustrating time. Many believe that since one party has a majority in both houses and in the White House, that it's going to be trivial to pass all this proposed legislation. Honestly if two or three major pieces get through in the next 2 years, it'll be a miracle.

If there's somewhere more appropriate, I'd be happy to discuss it further.

ga2500ev
 

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According to Chevrolet Grows EV Lineup with 2022 Bolt EUV and Bolt EV , the cargo room in ft^3 is:

EV: 16.6 (rear seat up), 57.0 (rear seat down)
EUV: 16.3 (rear seat up), 56.9 (rear seat down)

Where did the 3" of extra space in the rear seat go after folding down the rear seats?
It’s between the front and rear seat 🤷🏻‍♂️ Someone thought rear passengers needed more legroom. Although shouldn’t that show up as more seat down room?
 

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It’s between the front and rear seat 🤷🏻‍♂️ Someone thought rear passengers needed more legroom. Although shouldn’t that show up as more seat down room?
I think seat heights and space under front seat for rear legroom could be manipulated to get different numbers. It's rather complicated. I think SAE: J1100 is the standard. Here's an old revision: Motor Vehicle Dimensions
 

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I'm curious, will have to take a look at the EUV when it comes out. Wondering if there is an interior change, the EUF with the extra length up front will probably crash test better, if I recall correctly EU has pedestrian crash standards which could have caused some design decisions.
 

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Brad,
A simpler way is to take the battery size (60 kWh for a 2019 and before) and multiply it by your electricity rate.
Thus, as an example, 60 kWh * 0,08$ per kWh would yield a full charge costing 4,80$.

For the full charge time approximation, you take the battery size and divide it by your charger capacity (in kW).
Here, a 2019 Bolt EV connected to a 32A home charger on 220~240 volts would take:
60 kWh / (32A * 220v = 7,040 kW) = 8,5 hours.

Please note this is in perfect condition with 100% efficiency of all systems. Real life is a little more complicated.
HV DC converter is very efficient 94.3%....and for owners that use European electric standard it is even better. At 7.2 kWh it will charge 6.79 kWh usable.
 

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What are the maintenance requirements of a Bolt (thinking of an EUV, but answering for an EV is fine)? Besides tires and alignments, does the powertrain need maintenance like a gas car's oil changes, radiator fluid changes, belt changes, air filter changes, brake liner replacements?
 

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What are the maintenance requirements of a Bolt (thinking of an EUV, but answering for an EV is fine)? Besides tires and alignments, does the powertrain need maintenance like a gas car's oil changes, radiator fluid changes, belt changes, air filter changes, brake liner replacements?
There's oil in the motor/gearbox, but is more like the oil in a rear differential. There's no belts or air filters. Just a cabin filter. With regen, the brakes might last forever if they don't rust away first. The first scheduled maintenance is radiator fluid at 150,000 miles. I guess some people change their brake fluid at five years or something. I've never done that on any of my cars.
 

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What are the maintenance requirements of a Bolt (thinking of an EUV, but answering for an EV is fine)? Besides tires and alignments, does the powertrain need maintenance like a gas car's oil changes, radiator fluid changes, belt changes, air filter changes, brake liner replacements?
Don't laugh but compared to an IC car - none, well almost! Seriously there is the cabin air filter, brake fluid every year or two - most people don't stay on top of brake fluid like they should. A complete change of my vehicles is set for this spring. At some point the oil in gearbox (hesitate to call it transmission) but that is well down the road and since it should be cooler then life may be very good. A lot of the little things like lubricating latches and door hinges which will probably be forgotten as they are usually on the list for periodic maintenance. Shocks probably won't last forever as well as the tires. Brake pads should last a long time as well with the regenerative braking. Need to lift the hood every now and then just to have a look around and see if it needs wiper fluid. And there is coolant at some point - I used to change every couple of years but engines and coolant much improved so don't change. Wife's 2008 Smart car still had the OEM coolant that was changed in 2009 when the radiator was replaced after hitting a gator (truck tire tread).
 

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Not necessarily. As part of the tax code it can be included in a reconciliation bill.
It's not in the current bill and reconciliation can only be invoked once per budget cycle. There will be two cracks at it this year as last fiscal year's budget was never passed.

I just caution folks from thinking that because it's a proposal, that it's a done deal. Even with reconciliation, it only takes one rogue Senator to decide it's not worth it.

ga2500ev
 

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Know that Chevrolet/GM does not qualify for the up-to-$7,500 federal tax credit because they have sold too many cars, but curious about it: When it was available, was there an income ceiling limitation? Could a person have earned too much income and thus not qualified for it?
 

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What are the maintenance requirements of a Bolt (thinking of an EUV, but answering for an EV is fine)? Besides tires and alignments, does the powertrain need maintenance like a gas car's oil changes, radiator fluid changes, belt changes, air filter changes, brake liner replacements?
Page 303 of https://my.chevrolet.com/content/da.../boltev/2020-chevrolet-bolt-owners-manual.pdf lists maintenance for the 2020 model:

Rotate tires every 7,500 miles.
Replace cabin air filter every 22,500 miles or 2 years.
Replace coolant every 150,000 miles or 5 years.
Replace brake fluid every 5 years.
Replace wiper blades every 15,000 miles or 1 year. * **
Replace air conditioning dessicant every 7 years. **
Replace gas struts every 75,000 miles. **

* = Probably easy to tell when needed to replace.
** = Not present in 2017 model owner's manual.

Obviously, replace things like tires when they get worn out or damaged.
 

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... or even just one that applies a minuscule about of logic and reason to decision making (problem solving).
It's sort of a tough situation now. I know you'd prefer for the free market to decide. However, the federal government has already stepped into the mess. Where we are now is that everyone else making EVs has a distinct market advantage over two generally American automakers making EVs.

As with all politicians logic and reason goes out the window when those conclusions lead to bad press, lost votes, and challenges to their jobs. So, the most logical thing to do, which is get out of the subsidy business on all fronts (EVs, oil) isn't likely to happen.

The question is given the political ramifications, what is the most likely outcome?

ga2500ev
 
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