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I received the official news through an email from Chevrolet at 3:20 AM. I posted the news at gm-volt.com at 6:30 AM. So I am one of the few outsiders that received the news early today. But I know that many others did know ahead but waited for GM and Chevrolet to break the news, and you can find many (over thirty) articles published between yesterday and today about the 238 EPA rated miles.

Yet I am bothered that some of these articles still badmouth the Bolt EV and compare it aganst the TM Model 3 which is just a conceptual prototype more than 15 months away from a real production. And yet some did post that this news has GM way ahead, so either TM admits defeat or they will delay the production to mid 2018 and try to get more than 240 miles out of the Model 3 battery.

But for now, GM has beaten TM in price, delivery, and range. Go, GM!!
 

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If they were to add another delay to try and get back on top of the Bolts range. Would pricing be the same, and even if, I'm sure they would still be losing more reservations considering how long it's already been delayed
 

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238 is a bit more than what we were expecting to see! These are exciting time for future bolt owners. Think the high 256 mi city rating came from the drivers extensively using the regenerative braking system?
 

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238 is a bit more than what we were expecting to see! These are exciting time for future bolt owners. Think the high 256 mi city rating came from the drivers extensively using the regenerative braking system?
The EPA test have very specific profiles and are run in a lab environment. They are not the result of drivers driving the cars around. But to answer your question, as I understand it, the EPA test is done with the car in D mode not L mode.

BTW, my numbers above were slightly off. The EPA Highway range is 254 mi and the EPA City range is 218 mi.
 

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Yeah--there was a little debate going on in the Tesla forums about how to calculate the City and Highway ranges based on what we know. I've now convinced myself that first way I calculated these ranges was correct. The city range is 256 mi and the highway range is 220 mi. BTW, I had also accidentally swapped the incorrect city (254) and highway (218) numbers.

Sorry for the confusion!
 

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EPA Combined
119 MPGe
238 mi

EPA City
128 MPGe
256 mi

EPA Highway
110 MPGe
220 mi
Does somebody know how many miles the Chevy Bolt could drive with the top speed of 90 mph?
That's about the highest speed we can drive here in Austria/Europe on our highways.
I would guess 200 miles. Or ist that too much?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Does somebody know how many miles the Chevy Bolt could drive with the top speed of 90 mph?
That's about the highest speed we can drive here in Austria/Europe on our highways.
I would guess 200 miles. Or ist that too much?
A good rule of thumb is (above about 60 mph) every 5 mph increase results in a 10% range loss. You won't see anything even remotely near 200 miles at 90 mph. Maybe half that. Maybe less.
 

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I know that it's not realistic to drive 150 miles in one go with a high speed of 90 mph, but i just would like to know the theoretical numbers.
 

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I know that it's not realistic to drive 150 miles in one go with a high speed of 90 mph, but i just would like to know the theoretical numbers.
The Model S is not a good comparison to the Bolt EV in this case. The slope of that line is dictated by the aerodynamic drag force. The Bolt EV coefficient of drag is 33% higher than the Model S and so the line will be much steeper. At 90 mph steady cruising, the Bolt EV energy usage is probably 2-3x the average during the EPA test. 100 mi might not be possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The Model S is not a good comparison to the Bolt EV in this case. The slope of that line is dictated by the aerodynamic drag force. The Bolt EV coefficient of drag is 33% higher than the Model S and so the line will be much steeper. At 90 mph steady cruising, the Bolt EV energy usage is probably 2-3x the average during the EPA test. 100 mi might not be possible.
Agreed. If you look at the EPA ratings, Teslas are actually rated higher (MPGe and range) on the Hwy cycle than the city cycle. Every other EV (that I know of) has lower hwy numbers. Drag functions in an inverse squared relationship - going twice as fast requires 4 times the energy.

There are several things in that article that raise some questions.

1) Teslas EPA ratings are based on the EPA 2-cycle test, not the 5 cycle indicated in the article.
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/epadata/16data.zip
Select the "EV" sheet and look at column "BU". BMW, BYD and Nissan use the 5 cycle test. Everyone else uses the 2 cycle test

2) The graph seems to be unrelated to the EPA range rating and generated by some other means. They may very well be raw data at a steady cruising speed. The EPA hwy rating is a variable speed test and the results are then "adjusted". If the 2 cycle test is used, the results are derated by 30% (multiplied by .7) to better reflect real world results.

While the relationship in the posted graph is correct (range at 40 mph is double that at 80 mph), the numbers are not the EPA hwy range of the Model S.
 

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