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Discussion Starter #1
*90 percent city
*no climate controls (adopting Frank Lloyd Wright's philosophy of bringing outdoors in)
*100 percent regenerative braking (never touch mechanical brake except for reverse)
*gentle, conscious driving (same style that got me 70mpg lifetime over 175,000 miles in 2000 Honda Insight)
*all settings in Spanish. Not sure if this improved miles per charge but it has improved my Spanish

Impressions after 2 wks/600 mi:

*Moral Makeover: But first, Kudos to Musk not just for surviving his name--adversity makes us stronger--but also for popularizing the EV. He understands marketing. His engineers understand EVs. And really, if not for my dedication to promoting low-polluting living for as many as possible, I'd be driving one of his. But kudos to Chevy, too--and let's face it, these are the people that first brought you the miraculous EV1 20 years ago that could have had us all driving non-polluting vehicles by now...and then took them all back and crushed them--for being first to the finish line with an everyman's electric vehicle (EEV). Obviously Chevy is now convinced climate change is real and humans are on the brink of auto-extinction. Nothing less than a moral makeover at Chevy. Okay, maybe not. But at least they woke up and smelled the musk and decided, hey, wait a minute, who is this guy...WE'RE the electric vehicle company...even if we do crush them right after we make them. Tip: I've had my Bolt reinforced at strategic weld points to resist crushing and encourage others to do the same.

*One-pedal driving: This is to regenerative braking what the Model S and EV1 were to EVs: as soon as you experience it, there's no going back. I have not touched the mechanical brake driving forward since getting the car. It's seamless, smooth, progressive, stops and holds the car at a stop. Pay attention, Elon. Can your rockets do that? Okay, they can. But Chevy, what's up with the brake paddle? Was that the previous regen idea you just couldn't quite give up when you perfected the pedal? I have the intuitive sense that if I used paddle instead of pedal at 75K miles there would be copper windings all over the highway from stress on components. It's full on or off and you have to keep pulsing it. Nasty. IMHO, drop it and drop "D," too, leaving only "L" and forcing Americans, who love their freedom, to regenerate whether they like it or not. We're a bunch of spoiled brats who feel entitled to everything, including brake pedals. Not any more.

*Tip a canoe: I forgive this, too, because you're trying to make an EEV for, well, everyone. So it's tall like a little SUV because that's popular these days. Too tall. When all that battery weight way down there shifts side to side, way up there in the driver's seat, you get thrown side-to-side like a whale-watcher in a crow's nest (a mixed-species mixed metaphor). The suspension has to be heavy duty to handle that weight, yes, but the car doesn't have to be that tall. Once these things get popular and there are model choices, please make one that doesn't jerk side-to-side. The other benefit of not so tall is that you'll get the drag coefficient down. The wind sees too much face on this one, and that's what kills highway range. If I had gone 365 miles on the highway I'd still be out there trying to flag down generator trucks.

*Bad Ass Styling: And I mean that literally. While the lines of this car are not exactly MOMA-grade, they are passable except for the rear end. Who modeled for this...a Nissan LEAF? One of the dumpiest, most malproportioned, uninspired-looking vehicles ever designed? Elon, thanks for making different sexy. Chevy, thanks for making the forward two-thirds passable. But what's with the low-down hip-like bumpery things aft of the rear wheels? Is that really necessary? And do the taillights have to be so bulbous? Yes, I know other car companies are doing bulbous lights on their latest models, but do you have to be like everybody else? Please fix for next year and maybe offer straight trades to those of us who bought on principle despite the ass.

That's enough feedback for now, Chevy. You need time to digest. Nice work. You have almost redeemed yourself. And that's presuming the thing holds up. It feels solid, so I'm rooting for you. And, given your newfound moral commitment to non-polluting living, you'll be happy to know I presently charge with 100 percent wind-electric energy and soon will be charging from my off-grid solar array. I think you've done something good here. Please don't cave into the oil company pressure this time...I'd be crushed!
 

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.... drop "D," too, leaving only "L" and forcing Americans, who love their freedom, to regenerate whether they like it or not.
Agree with you 100% on this point!
I always drove my Volt in "L" and am continuing the tradition in the Bolt.

I had to pick up 10 2cu/ft bags of mulch last weekend- I used our 2003 Honda CRV... it seems soooo inefficient to not have regen braking. Driving the Bolt is literally a pleasure compared to an ICE vehicle.
 

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Thanks for seconding the e-motion, Rob, and I would add this, Chevy, if you're listening: Engaging "L" is a strange one, that "double-click" that isn't very "positive," as they say in the car trade. Often I think I've double-clicked only to find it's still in "D." In fact, you only know you're there if you search on the dash or shifter top, all visual, no audio or feel, since the shifter returns to the same central position whatever "gear" you're in. If you happen to be an idiot, as many of us, including myself, are, you don't confirm visually and just drive off. Then you come to the intersection with the main road and let off the accelerator, expecting that wonderful heavy regen to a stop. Instead you find yourself halfway into the intersection before you realize it hasn't shifted from D into L and you're only getting 1/2 the expected braking. If there's a car coming, you'll be crushed like an EV1. This isn't like a Prius shifter where there are no safety implications for a mistake; we're talking about a de-facto brake here and if you're in D instead of the expected L, it's as if someone has cut your brake lines and you only discover that when it's a bit too late. Audio confirmation of "L," Chevy? Just a thought from Brakeless in New Mexico.
 

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The benefits of “D” in additional to “L” are more obvious if one does more divided-highway driving. DID YOU KNOW: it’s possible to shift from L to D with cruise control engaged; and the cruise stays engaged seamlessly when you do that ! After that it requires less concentration slowing for traffic or taking an off-ramp, when hitting cruise-cancel while in “D” versus the sensitive accelerator positioning needed for this action when in “L” - - in order to avoid whiplash. A pull of the paddle turns off cruise as well. All goes nice and gently from D. A quick click down to L is always possible. I love all the alternatives. A one-speed transmission L-mode vehicle doesn’t sound like any fun at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the cruise control tips, which I hadn't figured out yet since I've spent so little time on the hwy. You may have spared me some whiplash. Yes, L-mode w/o any alternatives/choices harks to the old Soviet Union. I think it was Stalin who decreed one-mode regen in his day. We like our choices, especially when it comes to EV power and braking. I, for one, am not satisfied with just paddle, foot pedal, drive regen, and low regen, I want more, so I have modified my Bolt for a fifth mode: Flintstone Mode (FM). I have two doors in the floorpan below my feet, which I can open at will for an acceleration boost or added braking. Works good, but I've gone through a lot of shoes in 600 miles, so it may not be cost-effective.
 

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Welcome to the forum and congrats on exceeding Chevy's estimated range for the Bolt!

The tipping point, Chevy engineers said that they had to sacrifice aerodynamics for the tall body. Some may think it's worth it for the extra headroom and cabin space, some may not due to what you've experienced. Maybe the next iteration will be better, yes I think Chevy will keep producing plenty of EVs in various body style and maybe even update the Bolt. But that's way down the line.
 

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Thanks for the range compliment, and I do appreciate that Chevy was, in one vehicle, trying to reach the more "average" and "typical" consumer with their more practical consumer needs, meaning not the moneyed, conspicuously consuming Muskian Teslerite. A measure of their success in making this an everyman's car that looks like every other car in the parking lot blended together is the fact that I have one of the first Bolts in NM and in three weeks only one person has noticed. That's quite an achievement for a car that in many ways is a radical new thing.

And you've got to wonder, just how much does Chevy want it noticed. My Chevy truck wears an ad emblazoned on its tailgate six feet wide reading, "CHEVROLET." No question what we've got there. Quite a few highly readable decals elsewhere on it, too. Yet you need map and a magnifying glass to find and read "EV" on the side of the Bolt. And then, if you're most people, you think EV is some meaningless model designation like most of those numbers and letters attached to car names and don't give it further thought.

What do you make of that? Does Chevy really want the world to know this is an EV and ask the driver all about it so that millions are bought?
 

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Well I suppose it was only a question of time before the parsings of regenerative braking devolved into a proper debate over intellectualizing vs. philosophizing vs. moralizing. I’m all for it! I would love to think that there was a moral and/or philosophical makeover at Chevy, perhaps prompted by hitting rock-bottom recently, but I am nagged by the notion that it could be something considerably more practical, namely, the need to meet CA low-emissions requirements to sell cars—many cars, many ICE cars—there. But that’s not interesting. What’s interesting is your point about intellectualism vs. morals. I would ask us to remember the Right to Life Commandment, the 11th Commandment: “Thou shalt not, through thy selfish and self-serving super-polluting lifestyle, deny life to future generations.” That’s not intellectual and it’s not philosophical. It’s moral, it’s nice, and it’s common-sense. Or so some would say. The execs at Chevy, for example, or so one hopes.
 

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Ayuh. Chevy’s moral code consists of meeting the needs of the widest range of vehicle customers. Ranging all the way from one who needs to roar from 0-60 mph in ~3.0 seconds utilizing 650 horsepower and quickly reaching 196 miles per hour. (2017-Z06). To one who prefers a revolutionary affordable buzz box capable of travelling 365 miles if driven like granny while consuming less than 60kWH of energy.
 
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