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Found this today you can download the 3D model here and print it online or with your own printer…

Download the file here (there are 2 files, the 3d model is printed in two pieces which you glue them together when they arrive - very easy to do, this is how it is because it is much cheaper and easier to ship):


and you can print it from https://craftcloud3d.com/ which is recommended to you at the end of the purchase process.

Cost w/ ABS material + Shipping: ~$30 (PLA material is cheaper but doesn't like heat as much as ABS).
Thank you! TIL (Today I learned) that you can download 3D plans and them have them printed by someone else! I don't have a 3D printer so I thought I was out of luck. Also, Kudos to whomever drafted the 3D plans!
 

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Found this today you can download the 3D model here and print it online or with your own printer…

Download the file here (there are 2 files, the 3d model is printed in two pieces which you glue them together when they arrive - very easy to do, this is how it is because it is much cheaper and easier to ship):


and you can print it from https://craftcloud3d.com/ which is recommended to you at the end of the purchase process.

Cost w/ ABS material + Shipping: ~$30 (PLA material is cheaper but doesn't like heat as much as ABS).


Just a heads up for those considering this option: I purchased the 3D model and had it printed in ABS. The thickness of the lip on the tray is such that you have to press down on the console lid to get it to close. It obviously is putting a strain on the lid hinge, and I am not sure I am going to use in in our EUV.
 

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Bummer. Seems a shame to waste the money on the part. 3D prints typically have some percentage of infill so it is most probably not solid throughout. Common infill patterns are a grid. If you don't mind exposing the grid you could try sanding it down by laying sandpaper (wet sanding would be best). Lay the paper down on a flat surface and do it in figure 8s. You will need to balance the thickness of the part with its strength. If you find a thickness that works, you can fill in the spaces in the infill with epoxy.
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier - Silver
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Bummer. Seems a shame to waste the money on the part. 3D prints typically have some percentage of infill so it is most probably not solid throughout. Common infill patterns are a grid. If you don't mind exposing the grid you could try sanding it down by laying sandpaper (wet sanding would be best). Lay the paper down on a flat surface and do it in figure 8s. You will need to balance the thickness of the part with its strength. If you find a thickness that works, you can fill in the spaces in the infill with epoxy.
Or you could just by a macaroni salad at Aldi's. :ROFLMAO:
 
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