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Discussion Starter #1
Reading this article on reportlinker.com, they're saying that from a test they conducted, 81% of Americans say that they are not ready yet to buy an EV although 52% think it's a good return on investment.

Majority of people are just looking for more fuel efficient ICE vehicles.

They find the key problem in this is the lack of awareness and education on EVs. Stating exactly that "the most immediate barrier may be consumer knowledge"

While Americans aren’t inclined to buy an EV today, more than a third of Americans believe mass adoption will happen by 2035, and 29% say it will happen as early as 2025, the ReportLinker data show.

However, Millennials are more skeptical about mass adoption than the rest of the population: 66% believe it won’t happen until 2030 or later, compared to 54% of other generations, according to the ReportLinker survey.
Full article : http://www.reportlinker.com/insight/is-adoption-of-the-electric-vehicle-at-a-tipping-point.html?utm_medium=CP&utm_source=insight_EV&utm_campaign=sept2016&utm_content=survey
 

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I think anyone can be ready to buy an EV, it just depends on the cost to buy one, infrastructure, where and how long someone commutes, etc.

So someone commuting in a big city will find value in it since charging is not something to be worried about and often they have higher incomes.
 

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I think that the inability to charge an EV is the biggest obstacle to those that could use them the most, e.g., appartment/condo owners. Seems that for the near future the only one's willing to consider an EV are those that can plug in at home.
Yes there are some companies that are building a charging infrastructure, but it's still very limited and probably exceeds the cost of just using gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That does make sense. A lot of people are worried about not being able to find charge as well I find. They're unaware of where these charging stations will be and all of that stuff.
 

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Seems like a lot of the hesitation comes from ignorance and lack of information with almost half of the people not knowing what the range of an EV is. I assume once the Bolt and Model 3 are out, the hype will motivate people to seek out answers.
 

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It's going to be down to how Chevy markets the Bolt and how well the dealerships market it to potential buyers. Even if they are hesitant because of a lack of information, that can be remedied. Millennials may be more open to electric cars but it's never too late for those a bit older, heck we have Oldguy71 on the forum. Great guy who's ready for the Bolt EV.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A very small percentage of the population is really willing to learn on their own. The dealerships will have to market these by provided specific information that entices people. Range, Price, and how "easy" it will be to have it charged. Remove the fears from people and force the information in, and they should be good
 

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Well it really starts at the top, GM needs to do things on their level of the company. But what happens on a dealership level should complement those efforts higher up to educate potential owners and owners. But often that't not how it works, we have to do the digging and start conversations much like what's going on here... thankfully we have social media.
 

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Well it really starts at the top, GM needs to do things on their level of the company. But what happens on a dealership level should complement those efforts higher up to educate potential owners and owners. But often that't not how it works, we have to do the digging and start conversations much like what's going on here... thankfully we have social media.
Unfortunately, GM (or any manufacturer) has limited control over what happens at the dealership level. They can allocate (or withhold) funds based on dealer performance or other factors, but an individual dealer will make their own choice.

A perfect example:
I organize a National Drive Electric Week Event and Nissan is the "exclusive automotive sponsor". Nissan corporate made some funds available to promote my event, but my local dealer was not interested (even though they have 21 on their lot). He would have $0 out of pocket to promote the LEAF and his dealership - but no sale. He said he didn't want to sell the LEAF because he was losing money on them. I'll be spreading the word and helping prevent him from losing money by referring people to other dealers. Nissan's franchise agreement prevents any another dealer from participation in the event due to geographical territories.

Relying on dealers to promote EV's is hit and miss. Some embrace it and are very successful. Others not so much. There have been several studies done on dealers and EV's (Consumer Reports & UC Davis come to mind). The most recent I've run across is from the Sierra Club:
https://www.sierraclub.org/sites/www.sierraclub.org/files/uploads-wysiwig/1371%20Rev%20Up%20EVs%20Report_09_web%20FINAL.pdf
Not really a big enough sample to be statistically significant, but highlights some of the issues.
 
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