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I just installed a new JuiceBox pro40 and I’m confused on the car setting for either 8amp or 12 amp charging. Why would I pick one or the other
 

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When your JuiceBox Pro40 is connected to your Bolt, the 8 amp or 12 amp settings are ignored. Adjust the charging rate in your juicebox app under device settings. You can confirm the amperage while it's charging in the details section of the app.

I really like how easy it is to adjust the charging rate on the fly. Usually I keep my maximum amperage lower to charge slow, but if I know I need to charge faster, I can easily crank it up.
 

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Usually I keep my maximum amperage lower to charge slow, but if I know I need to charge faster, I can easily crank it up.
Why?
Do you have the perception that it is better for the battery? More efficient? Kinder to the grid and power company?
 

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I figure less strain on the battery and wires from a thermal perspective. Maybe the difference between 10 amps vs 32 amps is insignificant, but if I have the time, why not take it slow. Are there negative effects of charging slower?
 

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I figure less strain on the battery and wires from a thermal perspective. Maybe the difference between 10 amps vs 32 amps is insignificant, but if I have the time, why not take it slow. Are there negative effects of charging slower?
Yes, it takes more energy by forcing the battery conditioning to operate for a longer period of time. Since it's less efficient (somewhere between 5-10% when going from 7 to 1kW) this uses more electricity for the same battery charge, which also costs you more money.

At 7kW, the ~66kWh battery is barely feeling a tickle (0.1C).
 

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I figure less strain on the battery and wires from a thermal perspective. Maybe the difference between 10 amps vs 32 amps is insignificant, but if I have the time, why not take it slow. Are there negative effects of charging slower?
Yes, it takes more energy by forcing the battery conditioning to operate for a longer period of time. Since it's less efficient (somewhere between 5-10% when going from 7 to 1kW) this uses more electricity for the same battery charge, which also costs you more money.

At 7kW, the ~66kWh battery is barely feeling a tickle (0.1C).

I wonder what the optimal charge amperage is taking into account battery conditioning versus battery life.

https://electrek.co/2018/05/04/are-you-killing-your-lithium-batteries/
 

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Yes, it takes more energy by forcing the battery conditioning to operate for a longer period of time. Since it's less efficient (somewhere between 5-10% when going from 7 to 1kW) this uses more electricity for the same battery charge, which also costs you more money.

At 7kW, the ~66kWh battery is barely feeling a tickle (0.1C).
Battery conditioning = cooling (or warming) the battery to keep it within a reasonable operating temperature.

As you point out, 0.1C is barely feeling a tickle and won't contribute that much warmth, so battery conditioning mostly won't happen. A slower rate of charge is less heat over a longer period, so even less chance of battery conditioning.

(There will however be some overheads from just having the car's systems operating, so a lower charge rate should be less efficient.)
 

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For the first 3 months I had the car I had to rely on opportunity charging at public L2 chargers and the crappy L1 charger that came with the car. Worse yet was that when I used the L1 charger I had to use a 30 ft extension cord.

When I first set it up I tested it at 8 amps and 12 amps and checked to make sure that the extension cord didn't get hot or anything. Even over a period of several hours at 12 amps it didn't but I still used 8 amps most of the time for general principle.

The last time I charged with the L1 charger I needed to use 12 amps to get to my desired charge state before the morning so I set it like that overnight. In the morning when I went to unhook everything I found that while the extension cord wasn't hot the end of the extension cord (where the L1 charger plugs in) was quite warm and worse where the extension cord plugged into the outlet there were some scorch marks around the plug.

I went and bought a beefy heavy duty 14 gauge extension cord but I did not need to charge at home for the last 3 weeks before I finally got my Juicebox operational so I haven't needed to use it.

In general I think if you are charging at L1 and using the charger plugged directly into the wall and your house wiring is pretty new you are fine with 12 amps but if you need to use an extension cord make sure it's a very good one (minimum 14 gauge). I bought mine in a store but this one on Amazon seems better because it's 12 gauge. Also make sure your house (or wherever) wiring is all good.
 

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As a system tune-up I would replace the wall outlet with one rated 20 amps if I were going to use the included charger. Using the GFI version would be a good idea too. But don't put a larger breaker in the box!


I started looking for the cause of intermittent power in an old barn. I found half the outlets had been added to the simple original lighting circuit 50+ years ago and were so corroded that I replaced every one that looked bad. Apparently outlets, like switches, have a limited useful life. Especially when exposed to outdoor air.

While a 14 gauge cord is rated for 15 amps I think a 12 gauge one would be better if you are buying it for frequent use.
 

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I concur. I'm in the process of replacing a friend's electrical outlets in a condo they recently purchased. All of them. Switches, too. It's my housewarming gift to them. The outlets were original, 40 years old, and barely held any plug that was plugged into them. I shudder to think of the heat rise at the outlet that would result from a 12A connection that would barely hold the plug in the socket. If you're using the EVSE that comes with the Bolt, replace the receptacle that you will use. I'd recommend 20A (as also recommended above), and commercial grade.
 

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For the first 3 months I had the car I had to rely on opportunity charging at public L2 chargers and the crappy L1 charger that came with the car.
I've been using the GM-supplied EVSE since I bought the car 6 months ago and I've abandoned my plans to install a higher capacity unit because I've found that it charges plenty fast enough for home use when I adapt it to use a 240V outlet.
 

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I've been using the GM-supplied EVSE since I bought the car 6 months ago and I've abandoned my plans to install a higher capacity unit because I've found that it charges plenty fast enough for home use when I adapt it to use a 240V outlet.
With my charging needs I easily could have got away with the GM supplied L1 charger indefinitely but I have to tell you it was a PITA to set that thing up every time I wanted to use it and tear it down to put in the trunk every time I was done.

Now if I had a 110v outlet close to where I parked (and I had one installed when I had my 220v outlet installed) that would have been a fair amount easier cause I wouldn't have had to mess with an extension cord every time. And it would have been MUCH less expensive to install just that 110v outlet rather than have to run all new electrical wires from my main panel and install a sub panel in my detached garage. Probably in the $200 range instead of the ~$1500 I ended up paying for all the electrical work I had done.

And I could have bought a second L1 charger and more or less permanently mounted it to the side of my garage which would have made the convenience factor similar to what I've got now with my JuiceBox. The cheapest EVSEs I can find on Amazon are in the $200 range for a 16A L1/L2 charger.

Of course if I did that I wouldn't have the option to charge at 7.2kW if I really needed to. And having a "smart" EVSE gives me lot's of neat data about my charging.

And while I was having the electrical re-done in my garage I went ahead and installed a 220v outlet inside the garage which I can use if I ever start parking in the garage or my wife gets a BEV or PHEV. I also installed several more 110v outlets inside and outside the garage to make my life easier in general.

Also my electrical feed to my garage is a lot less janky than it was before. When my house was built in 1957 there was no power to the garage, at some point a previous homeowner tapped into an existing circuit inside the house, ran wire (in EMT conduit buried just a couple inches below the back yard) and installed a couple outlets inside the garage. When I bought the house in 2000 the conduit had become exposed was rusting and broken in places so you could see the wire so I ripped all that out and replaced it with proper underground (buried 24" deep) conduit and new wire (the electrician said I did a good job and he was able to re-use the conduit I laid for the new 60A circuit). Now I have a dedicated circuit for the garage, a sub panel with separate breakers for the outlets and I've got more that twice as many outlets as before.
 

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With my charging needs I easily could have got away with the GM supplied L1 charger indefinitely but I have to tell you it was a PITA to set that thing up every time I wanted to use it and tear it down to put in the trunk every time I was done.

Now if I had a 110v outlet close to where I parked (and I had one installed when I had my 220v outlet installed) that would have been a fair amount easier cause I wouldn't have had to mess with an extension cord every time. And it would have been MUCH less expensive to install just that 110v outlet rather than have to run all new electrical wires from my main panel and install a sub panel in my detached garage. Probably in the $200 range instead of the ~$1500 I ended up paying for all the electrical work I had done.

And I could have bought a second L1 charger and more or less permanently mounted it to the side of my garage which would have made the convenience factor similar to what I've got now with my JuiceBox. The cheapest EVSEs I can find on Amazon are in the $200 range for a 16A L1/L2 charger.

Of course if I did that I wouldn't have the option to charge at 7.2kW if I really needed to. And having a "smart" EVSE gives me lot's of neat data about my charging.

And while I was having the electrical re-done in my garage I went ahead and installed a 220v outlet inside the garage which I can use if I ever start parking in the garage or my wife gets a BEV or PHEV. I also installed several more 110v outlets inside and outside the garage to make my life easier in general.

Also my electrical feed to my garage is a lot less janky than it was before. When my house was built in 1957 there was no power to the garage, at some point a previous homeowner tapped into an existing circuit inside the house, ran wire (in EMT conduit buried just a couple inches below the back yard) and installed a couple outlets inside the garage. When I bought the house in 2000 the conduit had become exposed was rusting and broken in places so you could see the wire so I ripped all that out and replaced it with proper underground (buried 24" deep) conduit and new wire (the electrician said I did a good job and he was able to re-use the conduit I laid for the new 60A circuit). Now I have a dedicated circuit for the garage, a sub panel with separate breakers for the outlets and I've got more that twice as many outlets as before.
Sounds like you did something similar to what I did during a remodel in my current house, with an attached garage. We already had two EVs, and the 100A main simply wasn't adequate. I upgraded the main to 200A (lucky the feed supported it), and put a 100A sub in the garage. We have two NEMA 14-50Rs in the garage, along with eight new 5-20Rs. we charge to Bolt with a Versacharge plugged into one 14-50R, and our Volt gets the (modified) 120V EVSE that came with the Bolt.

The other 14-50R stares at me, forlorn.
 

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I concur. I'm in the process of replacing a friend's electrical outlets in a condo they recently purchased. All of them. Switches, too. It's my housewarming gift to them. The outlets were original, 40 years old, and barely held any plug that was plugged into them. I shudder to think of the heat rise at the outlet that would result from a 12A connection that would barely hold the plug in the socket. If you're using the EVSE that comes with the Bolt, replace the receptacle that you will use. I'd recommend 20A (as also recommended above), and commercial grade.
It's not just old houses. My house is about 20yr old and I've replaced ever receptacle and switch in it. The stuff the contractor used was literally falling apart, as in the plastic crumbling. Since it was wired with push-in connections rather than screwed down, the broken down plastic, which should have held the clips tight, didn't. I had multiple receptacles shoot out flame and one literal fell out of the box when my wife tried to plug in the vacuum. Be careful out there.

Ron
 

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With my charging needs I easily could have got away with the GM supplied L1 charger indefinitely but I have to tell you it was a PITA to set that thing up every time I wanted to use it and tear it down to put in the trunk every time I was done.
Ah, that's why I bought a Tesla UMC. The EVSE that came with the Bolt is mounted on screws on my garage wall and the Tesla UMC is in the car in case I ever need to charge from an AC outlet on the road. The beauty of the Tesla UMC is it's interchangeable AC pigtails that let me take advantage of a 120V/15A, 240V/30A or 240V/50A outlet.
 
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