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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
You have no doubt been exposed to the constant discussion of D vs L. :eek:

I decided to contact News Coulomb. That is a constant YouTube venture into looking at all the maximums of the Bolt. The owner operator shares many distance and daily records, while doing his daily blog on the Bolt. He has more daily videos on Bolt performance than anyone else on Earth.

So??? I asked him about the D or L controversy. I asked him what he used, when going on those long highway hauls, and when trying for record distances. And his answer was:

"Regardless, I drive in L 99.9% of the time. Freeway, city traffic, etc. I will occasionally use D if there's a grade I can roll down or a red stop light 500+ feet ahead. Other than that, I almost never drive in D."

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJqgqWqKmdkIuBZa7JK5KSw
 

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Where I find D useful is on the freeway while using cruise control. When cruise control is disengaged, the amount of braking you get when in D, I find to be just about ideal. Using L with cruise control I find too jerky.

That's the only time I use it though. Improvements for the future I'd like to see is, user configurable preferences for D vs. L to be the default as well as sport mode on or off so that when you first start your car, it's already the way prefer to drive. In addition, I wish reverse was also one pedal driving, basically going backwards in L.
 

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Where I find D useful is on the freeway while using cruise control. When cruise control is disengaged, the amount of braking you get when in D, I find to be just about ideal. Using L with cruise control I find too jerky.
I use cruise control quite a lot (sometimes at low speeds away from freeways where I want to maintain a constant speed on quiet roads). My trick for regaining control is before I disengage, I put my foot back on the throttle at the right position. Done right, the disengaging the cruise control then causes no noticeable difference other than transferring control back to my foot.
 

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I use cruise control quite a lot (sometimes at low speeds away from freeways where I want to maintain a constant speed on quiet roads). My trick for regaining control is before I disengage, I put my foot back on the throttle at the right position. Done right, the disengaging the cruise control then causes no noticeable difference other than transferring control back to my foot.
This true and I've done that too. I just find it easier to just slap it into D and then back out again once I'm off the freeway, or highway.
 

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The more you drive the less you will use "D" mode. I use to tap back to "D" on the highway all the time, however now I am a full time "L" driver. I have driven my Bolt 34,000 plus miles and I think the News Coulomb guy is pushing 60,000 miles. Once you drive the car that much, you get used to modulating the speed in "L" mode a lot more effectively. Taking your foot of the "gas" pedal is how we drive ICE cars on the highway or higher speeds. Once you learn to drive in "L" mode you will use the "D" much less.
 

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I am 99.9% L and .1% Neutral. If I am on the highway and I see the signs that I am entering a construction zone in a half a mile, I slap the shifter into neutral and coast my way from 70 mph down to 45 mph. Any time I am going from one speed zone down to a slower speed zone (45 to 35, etc) I slap it into neutral and then (in the 45 to 35 example) at 36 pop it into D and hit the "set" button on the cruise control... it usually drops 1 mph between entering D and accepting my input on the cruise control leaving me set at the speed limit.

I really wish that there was an "eco" setting on the cruise control. As is, if I am going from a 35 zone up to 55 I either bump the cruise up 1 mph at a time with a pause between bumps (keeping kw usage below 22) or slowly accelerate with the pedal and set the cruise when I get to the new higher speed limit. In testing I have done (just me in the car, level road) going from 25 mph up to 55 mph by just hitting the resume button on the cruise results in (most I have seen) 65 KW of power usage. I think with a heavily loaded car, or a higher initial setting on the cruise control it would spike power usage even higher.

Later,

Keith

PS: Had to reply because I never see anyone talk about coasting in neutral.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, as long as it is understood that the initial example given does none of that.
News Coulomb now has hundreds of videos, just on Bolt performance and management.
And yes, he has had several contract Bolts, and has over 60,000 just on his most recent.
The first post in this thread was a direct quote from the man who investigated all the ups
and downs of mountains, long highway miles, all the various chargers and the TLC of a Bolt.

"...I drive in L 99.9% of the time..."

Like that source, and many others, I feel that the long term delicate skill of feathering the one
pedal is the skill to develop. Besides whatever professions that I have had during my life, I
have been a drummer for many decades. The single pedal control seems very natural to me,
and is amplified in intensity by the flipper. When one gets good enough, driving a Bolt is very
similar to playing a musical instrument, which is a great analogy. When you get good at all that
you are smoothly going from forward momentum to a felt neutral, to a negative slight regen to
heavy regen...and then just as smoothly back to forward...with all nuances between. I admire
the engineers who have allowed us to play this machine to the max.
 

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I am 99.9% L and .1% Neutral. [...] Had to reply because I never see anyone talk about coasting in neutral.
Although shifting to neutral is certainly an option the car provides, I think it's mostly poor choice in almost any car.

In an ICE vehicle, it's usually a terrible choice because it wastes fuel keeping the the engine turning over. If you coast, the engine turns over because of the motion of the car but no fuel is used.

In the Bolt, putting the car in neutral does not disengage the motor from the wheels, because the gearing is permanent. So you get the drag from spinning the motor around, but don't gain any energy from it. In addition, the cars systems still draw power, so like an ICE vehicle, you're potentially wasting energy. Look at the power usage; it'll probably display 1 kW being used when you're in neutral.

If you want to play “coast efficiently” games, it's better to shoot for 0 kW on the display, which means you're getting just enough regen to not need the power from the battery but not enough to charge the battery (which will incur charging losses). That is something you won't be able to get in “N”.

Finally, there are safety issues related to putting the car in neutral. It means in a situation where you suddenly need power you won't have it.
 

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100% L here
Been doing that since I had my i-MiEV from 2015


When alone in the car i don't feather anything. then when my DD is in the car I have to try because she hates L. No I don't do it hard when she is in the car, she is just s typical teenager
 

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For some of us, anything on YouTube is by definition a suspect source. That's like having your daughter watch The Batchelor/Batchelorette for relationship advice.

That he hedged at only 99.9% L without giving the best reason for the .1% other. It has been discussed and proven here on dozens of threads, there's no energy saving from using D or N and trying to coast. Learn to use L to best advantage and it's seamless.

About that .1%; a downhill blind curve on an icy road, coast is a good idea. Come around that blind curve and need to slow, back off the accelerator suddenly, ICE compression/EV regen slows the front wheels before the back, that's where a FWD can spin out. When coasting in N, all four brakes can be applied evenly. Learned that long ago with our first FWD.

jack vines
 

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That he hedged at only 99.9% L without giving the best reason for the .1% other. It has been discussed and proven here on dozens of threads, there's no energy saving from using D or N and trying to coast. Learn to use L to best advantage and it's seamless.
The reason for .1% is purely convenience. You can "learn" to use L to its best advantage, but that doesn't replace the fact that it is one-pedal driving. The reason I occasionally use D is because it is zero pedal driving (i.e., I get to give my foot a rest for a few seconds without having to modulate a pedal).

Also, my statement was never meant to be authoritative. It is simply my preference. You do you. The difference between energy efficiency and energy recovery in D versus L would be negligible at best. An efficient driver using D will be more efficient than an inefficient driver using L, and vice versa.
 

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In an ICE vehicle, it's usually a terrible choice because it wastes fuel keeping the the engine turning over. If you coast, the engine turns over because of the motion of the car but no fuel is used.

In the Bolt, putting the car in neutral does not disengage the motor from the wheels, because the gearing is permanent. So you get the drag from spinning the motor around, but don't gain any energy from it. In addition, the cars systems still draw power, so like an ICE vehicle, you're potentially wasting energy.
Only a bad choice when keeping it 'in gear' means you don't have to use friction brakes that you otherwise would have used. Or when it allows you to use the friction brakes less. If you were not going to use friction brakes anyways, it doesn't matter that much. There are simply no free rides.

If you were not going to use the friction brakes, then using the cars energy to spin the engine or motor means you are slowing down the car more that you needed to, and you will have to burn fuel or electrons later to regain the lost speed.
 

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Only a bad choice when keeping it 'in gear' means you don't have to use friction brakes that you otherwise would have used. Or when it allows you to use the friction brakes less. If you were not going to use friction brakes anyways, it doesn't matter that much. There are simply no free rides.

If you were not going to use the friction brakes, then using the cars energy to spin the engine or motor means you are slowing down the car more that you needed to, and you will have to burn fuel or electrons later to regain the lost speed.
It's true that there are no free rides. If you have a standard ICE car, when the car is on the engine is spinning and the energy to spin the engine has to come from somewhere. The engine is at its least efficient when it is idling, so putting the car in neutral and having it idle isn't very good.

If the car is in a high gear, the wheels will turn the engine over at moderate speed and only cause modest drag. In a traditional automatic, it can also use the torque converter to allow the engine to have a loose connection to the wheels, minimizing engine drag while still keeping it turning over at a reasonable speed.

Coasting on a downgrade in neutral is illegal in many states, Alabama (§ 32-5A-57), Arizona (§ 28-895), Arkansas (§ 27-51-1404), California (§ 21710), Colorado (§ 42-4-1009), Delaware (§ 4187), Georgia (§ 40-6-246), Illinois (§ 11-1410), Michigan, Montana, Nebraska (§ 60-6,182), Nevada (§ 484B.123), New Jersey (§ 39:4-55), New York (§ 1216), Tennessee (§ 55-8-167), Texas (§ 7-545-406), Virginia (§ 46.2-811), Washington (§ 46.61.630).

There are numerous articles that tell you coasting in neutral is foolish. Here's an article from Popular Mechanics.

It's just not a good idea.
 
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