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To the OP: Please be aware that some people on this forum have NO IDEA what you mean when you confuse kW and kWh. Most of us can figure it out from context, but some people just really can't figure it out, no matter how obvious it is. For those people's sake, let's try to get those units right. EVs are new to many of us (well, pretty much all of us), but we are expected to get these things right no matter what... so that we don't confuse those who have trouble figuring these things out from context. I'm sure these people are not trying to make you feel stupid, because that would make them bad people... and I'm sure they are not bad people. They are just really bad at picking up on context in a conversation. So, on that note, let me just say this:

Kilowatts are a measure of power, while kilowatt hour is a measure of energy. An easier way to think of this is like water flowing into a glass. Kilowatt is like the rate at which the water is flowing, whereas kilowatt hour is the amount of water in the glass. So, power flows into your batter in kilowatts, but your battery holds kilowatt hours of energy. Now we can get on to your real question, and the answer you are looking for.

  • 11kW is the rate at which you can charge at home on 240v power. There are also public charging stations that use 240v power, and these are often called level 2 or L2 stations or "destination chargers."

  • 55kW is the rate that the Bolt can charge on a DC fast charger. These are the ~400 volt DC (direct current) chargers that send juice straight to the battery using those extra connectors that are beneath the orange cover in the charger door of your Bolt. These are the ones you typically find out on the highways, but also around town.

NOTE: DC fast chargers are honest to goodness chargers, whereas your home "charger" is really just a somewhat smart cord that sends power to the [actual] charger that is onboard your car -- much like the little USB block you plug into the wall to charge your phone is not really a charger... is is just a power supply that feeds the charging circuit inside of your phone. However, as more ordinary (non-EV geeks) drive EVs, level 2 equipment will just start to become popularly known as "chargers." But, if you don't want to anger the easily confused EV geeks, you can call them EVSEs (electric vehicle service equipment).
 

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There is no actual Level 3 charge standard-compliant equipment out in the wild...

This mistake is so common now, that I'm getting tired of fighting it, and will probably just give up doing so.
Yes... that's probably best. DCFC is going to be known as "level 3" just as EVSEs are going to be commonly known as "chargers." Fighting this is a losing battle that just makes EV fans look like geeky snobs.
 

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I'm not a huge fan of the "level x" system, anyway. I mean, L1 just means 120v and L2 means 208/240v. It doesn't technically mean one os faster than the other. L1 at 16 amps is faster than L2 at 6 amps. Yes, I know the Bolt won't charge at 16 amps on 120, but other EVs do. And yes, there are L2 EVSEs out there that will go down to 6 amps... I happen to have one that will. L1 has a pretty small range of amperage, whereas L2 has a pretty big range, which even overlaps L1 in terms of power. These really should have just been combined into "Level 1" and then described as being 120v or 208/240v at a certain amperage.

It's not likely we will see true SAE L3 AC charging here int he US... at least not on light duty vehicles. L3 AC is 3-phase. They do use this on some light vehicles in Europe, but that's because 3-phase power is a little more common over there in non-industrial applications. A lot of public L2 charging in the US is fed from two phases of a 3-phase line, which is where you get 208v. Not the same as an actual 3-phase EVSE. It is pretty cool in Europe that there are cars that can charge on 22kW 3-phase EVSEs that are no bigger or more complicated than an 11kW unit here.
 

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Also, according to SAE, L1 is up to 1.92kW at 120V and L2 starts at 5kW at 208V... so apparently there are no 16 amp L2 EVSEs. That's weird, because I have 6 of them in my trunk right now. Not kidding.

EDIT: I just realized that 16 amp 240V charging must be Level 1.5! Or is that Level 1B?
 
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