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P.S. Don’t take it personal, I do like to tease you about Tesla
Sure. I don't mind. I'm used to having an opinion a little different than most here and I wind up looking like I have some extreme opposing view simply because I feel inclined to provide a vigorous defense.

But if you go back a year ago, I said then that I liked Tesla but didn't think it was worth the additional price for myself. Me, from a year ago would still feel that way. I've changed more than Tesla has. You might say I've looked at my mortality and changed my priorities.
 

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What do you consider to be a "road trip"? I've driven our Bolt from Portland (OR) to Vancouver (BC), and it was probably within 30 minutes or so of when I've driven in our ICE vehicle - or how I would do in a Tesla. That's keeping in mind that I will NOT drive straight thru under any circumstances - except maybe a zombie apocalypse or similar. I want and need breaks to stretch my legs, bathroom stops, food, etc...
Different folk travel differently.

Your Portland to Vancouver is 315 miles and 4 hours 47 minutes in the middle of the night when there's no traffic. For us, there would be one potty stop. During the day, one might never get to Vancouver.

A road trip we make once or twice a year is Spokane to Salt Lake City. It's 723 miles and in the summer, we've sometimes made it in less than ten hours. And yes, we've taken it slower, with one overnight stop and occasionally two overnight stops. We've found overnights chew up a lot of time and money. Each overnight adds $300 and then we could have flown for less cost.

In the summer, it's theoretically possible to do this trip in a Bolt in seventeen hours. In winter, with the Bolt's range being <150 miles, I wouldn't ever consider it, unless fleeing the zombie apocalypse. (But one SLC family member says that's ground zero.)

jack vines
 

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In winter, with the Bolt's range being <150 miles, I wouldn't ever consider it, unless fleeing the zombie apocalypse. (But one SLC family member says that's ground zero.)

jack vines
There is a reason no one did a 1000 km challenge during winter time. And I mean temperatures well bellow freezing point, not Florida winters. And yes, instead of doing a 1000 km trip on a car, I’d rather get a plane, no EV or ICE would be on my list for me.
 

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Different folk travel differently.

Your Portland to Vancouver is 315 miles and 4 hours 47 minutes in the middle of the night when there's no traffic. For us, there would be one potty stop. During the day, one might never get to Vancouver.

A road trip we make once or twice a year is Spokane to Salt Lake City. It's 723 miles and in the summer, we've sometimes made it in less than ten hours. And yes, we've taken it slower, with one overnight stop and occasionally two overnight stops. We've found overnights chew up a lot of time and money. Each overnight adds $300 and then we could have flown for less cost.

In the summer, it's theoretically possible to do this trip in a Bolt in seventeen hours. In winter, with the Bolt's range being <150 miles, I wouldn't ever consider it, unless fleeing the zombie apocalypse. (But one SLC family member says that's ground zero.)

jack vines
Your first line says it all.

The Portland to Vancouver trips are about as long as I'm typically willing to drive these days - but I still consider it a road trip. Getting thru Seattle can be a pain, but we've always made it. I'm NOT going to do it in the middle of the night. I'm NOT going to just make a single pit stop.

The only longer road trip I've done in the last 5 years is Sonoma to Portland - and that was only because I was in Sonoma at the beginning of October 2017 fires. The only reasonable way out for us was to take our rental car and drive it home.

I'm "done" intentionally doing drives as long as your Spokane to SLC drive. Doubly "done" driving any real distance in the west in the winter (other than Portland to Mount Hood or similar).

On the other hand, in this area, many (most?) 500 mile or less trips could be done with a Bolt without too much more pain than ICE or Tesla. Assuming you'd be planning on taking breaks from driving anyway...
 

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Not sure where you got that from. For any car, especially a luxury car, Tesla has one of the lowest maintenance costs. Tesla doesn't even adhere to a schedule rather than just address issues as they arise.

Maintenance Schedule (tesla.com)

Your vehicle should generally be serviced on an as-needed basis. However, Tesla recommends the following maintenance items and intervals, as applicable to your vehicle, to ensure continued reliability and efficiency of your Model 3.

  • Brake fluid health check every 2 years (replace if necessary).
  • A/C desiccant bag replacement every 6 years.
  • Cabin air filter replacement every 2 years.
  • Clean and lubricate brake calipers every year or 12,500 miles (20,000 km) if in an area where roads are salted during winter
  • Rotate tires every 6,250 miles (10,000 km) or if tread depth difference is 2/32 in (1.5 mm) or greater, whichever comes first
Your Battery coolant does not need to be replaced for the life of your vehicle under most circumstances. Brake fluid should be checked every 2 years, replacing if necessary.

Here's the Bolt's maintenance schedule. Pretty much the same.

Required Services Every 12 000 km/7,500 mi
• Rotate the tires, if recommended for the vehicle, and perform the following services. See Tire Rotation.
• Check vehicle coolant level.
• Check windshield washer fluid level. See Washer Fluid.
• Visually inspect windshield wiper blades for wear, cracking, or contamination. See Exterior Care. Replace worn or damaged wiper blades. See Wiper Blade Replacement.
• Check tire inflation pressures. See Tire Pressure.
• Inspect tire wear. See Tire Inspection.
• Visually check for fluid leaks.
• Inspect brake system. See Exterior Care.
• Visually inspect steering, suspension, and chassis components for damaged, loose, or missing parts or signs of wear. See Exterior Care.
• Check restraint system components. See Safety System Check.
• Lubricate body components. See Exterior Care.
• Check accelerator pedal for damage, high effort, or binding. Replace if needed.
• Visually inspect gas strut for signs of wear, cracks, or other damage. Check the hold open ability of the strut. See your dealer if service is required.
• Check tire sealant expiration date, if equipped. See Tire Sealant and Compressor Kit.


I doubt an ICEV is any less as none of these are related to the drivetrain.

And yes, I'm a Tesla fan that doesn't own a Bolt but I don't make up false criticism of a car I don't own.
Teslas do not have much maintenance (comparable to other EVs), though the price of such if you get it done by Tesla may be higher than Bolt maintenance would be at a Chevrolet dealer. But if you DIY the maintenance, the price mostly washes out.
 

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I think it's even worse with EA. The last time I computed the difference, breakeven cost would have been an ICE that got about 32MPG on the interstate. I previously got mid 50's with my Chevy Cruze on the same trip. That made it somewhat cheaper.

At home, it's quite cheap. It's less than 1/3 the cost of EA. I am also using the supplied L1 charger on 240V. Home charging covers me 100%
 

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Teslas do not have much maintenance (comparable to other EVs), though the price of such if you get it done by Tesla may be higher than Bolt maintenance would be at a Chevrolet dealer. But if you DIY the maintenance, the price mostly washes out.
I just got the periodic maintenance done for $19.95 at Chevy. That was a tire rotation and check everything.

I think some of the impressions of Tesla maintenance costs come from the early days where you had to spend something $650 a year with Tesla to keep the warranty in effect. I think they stopped that stuff.
 

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I just got the periodic maintenance done for $19.95 at Chevy. That was a tire rotation and check everything.

I think some of the impressions of Tesla maintenance costs come from the early days where you had to spend something $650 a year with Tesla to keep the warranty in effect. I think they stopped that stuff.
So if you followed their maintenance schedule linked above what would the actual cost be? Performed by Tesla.
I like that they 'clean and lube brake calipers' - "every 12.5k miles if you live in salt country".

That's the item that failed on one of my EV's. This should be an item on all car schedules.
And it's not a 'visual inspection'. The slider pins need to be disassembled and cleaned and lubed.
But I have not done this work on my Bolt, yet. It will have to wait for nicer weather.:confused:
Your brake pads can look like new, but if one of the sliders starts to get sticky/rusty one of the pads will wear quickly.
 

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The M3 is a very low slung sedan, with the plus of better handling.
I assume we're talking about the Model 3, not the BMW M3. ;)
I have a '21 SR+ 3 (I guess now officially RWD Model 3) and I remember one time I was coming towards a traffic signal where you had to turn left at. The light turned yellow in that "no man's land" zone, and I decided to keep going through the signal instead of slam on the brakes. When I turned the wheel left, the 3 dug into the turn like a hot knife cutting through a stick of butter. I was surprised by how well it dug into the turn. My Bolt would have been screeching its wheels while borderline sliding through the turn.

I CAN tell OP that the Tesla service experience is not anywhere near the driving experience. If driving a Tesla is a hot knife through butter, getting warranty work done on a Tesla is like trying to carve a 25 pound turkey with the cheapest bendy plastic knife ever made.
 

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I got it from an episode of Rich Rebuilds I believe or one of the sites that cover Tesla. Feel free to look for it. Are you a Tesla fan, or an owner of one for several years? Whatever the schedule states it is important for someone looking at an expensive car purchase to research possible real world issues if low maint. and possible reliability issues are a concern so I was mentioning that to the OP (not anyone else here) because that was the intent of the post. I'd say the same thing about the Bolt or any car I've owned if it has abnormal costs. I'll say our 2010 Mazda 5 had rear strut issues but I doubt it matters to the OP. Tesla fans can be fanatics so many of them might downplay problems.
I think the lesson here is to ignore advice from Rich Rebuilds. If i'm not mistaken, he has had several run-in's with Tesla over using the SuC network on a salvaged car. Not saying he's intentionally spreading FUD because of a butt hurt but it's a 2 minute Google search. He should have known better.
Now maybe he's referring to QC issues after warranty which would be a whole other matter. I think Consumer Reports is way out of line to categorize paint blemishes under reliability but from my experience and what I read, I would agree that Tesla overall is not at Lexus levels of QC.
I just got the periodic maintenance done for $19.95 at Chevy. That was a tire rotation and check everything.

I think some of the impressions of Tesla maintenance costs come from the early days where you had to spend something $650 a year with Tesla to keep the warranty in effect. I think they stopped that stuff.
They offered an Extended Service Agreement for a few years but it wasn't required to maintain the original warranty. You are correct, they dropped it around the time they discontinued scheduled maintenance.

Extended Service Agreement | Tesla
The Extended Service Agreement covers the repair or replacement necessary to correct defects in the materials or workmanship of most parts manufactured or supplied by Tesla during the coverage period, excluding the lithium-ion battery and drive unit, which have their own separate warranty. The Extended Service Agreement is not a Maintenance Plan. Coverage is based upon the purchased agreement option and takes effect on the date that your original New Vehicle Limited Warranty expires.

I recently had my first out of warranty experience and can share it as a single reference FWIW.
A brief history:
I have an early build Model 3 for almost 4 years, ~70k miles. It's my only car in a household of 1. I've had 3 service appointments while under warranty. Two were done in my office parking lot and counting the time to schedule in the app, total time on my end was less than 5 minutes each. Mobile tech texted when he was 30 minutes out, then again when he arrived so I could meet him to hand over the key card, then again when he was done so I could sign the work order. They were simple QC repairs of a sticky glove box latch and the magnet on the charge port door fell out.
I had one major repair about 2 years in to replace the AC compressor. Scheduled via app, they texted when the part arrived about a week or so later, (AC still worked, but not as well) dropped the car off and picked up a Model X as a loaner. Swapped back to my car next morning. About as simple and painless as should be. Probably no different that a typical ICEV warranty claim.

About a month ago, heard some squeaking coming from the front while driving slow on rough pavement. Happened to be in the area of the SvC and popped in to ask if something like that would be still under warranty and the service advisor looked up the car and said it was not, however, it sounded like the control arm bushing which is a known problem. This is where the QC of Tesla is lacking as this is either a flaw in design/spec/QC, take your pick. It certainly wasn't a safety or reliability issue unless you write for CR or Seeking Alpha so it wouldn't fall under a recall. Not the news I was hoping for but not totally unexpected either. She also offered that as it's a known "issue", Tesla will do the repair at a reasonable cost to me. I asked her what her definition of reasonable was and she said about $200. I then asked each? Yes, was her response and that it probably made sense to do both. I thanked her and said I will probably wait till after the first of the new year at which point she said they are fairly busy so take that into consideration.

So last week of the year, I scheduled the service via the app which asks for a description. I only wrote "squeak in front end". About a day later they sent the estimate for approval which was around $360. I approved it and was scheduled for 1/3/22. I ended up pushing it back to 1/10/22 as my galpals B'day is that day and we had plans. All still done via the app.
So yesterday, at 10:30 I drop off the car and they give me an almost new (1200 miles) Model 3 as a loaner. I confirmed that the estimate was for both control arms and he didn't believe it was. This is a known Tesla weakness. Communication. It could just be Covid related but it's been this way since the beginning so I think it's more to do with explosive growth, maybe turnover at that level. We agreed to inspect the other side that was not squeaking and we can determine if it too should be replaced. About an hour later I get a call that the tech inspected it and felt that it should also be replaced as it was of the same crappy parts, (my words, not his). I asked the cost and he fumbled with "well it should be less than double since we're doing both and expects it to be around $360. Tesla ineptness again. So the original quote was for both but the service advisor had no idea. Not good but no surprises on the price so again I approved the repair.

Two hours later, I get a call that the car is ready. I drive over to pick it up and he can't seem to get the work order to finalize the billing since they had sent two more messages via the app on the cost to repair which of course I never opened since the work was already approved. They were each for a different amount than the original estimate. Fortunately, it ended up being cheaper than the estimate so I was happy but still not a good look for Tesla. I've attached the final billing so those interested to see what they do on a routine matter now know.
In the end, Tesla did not charge for labor since this is something they feel somewhat responsible for its premature demise. It should also be noted that the SvC is not intended to be a profit center so if true, they should be fair in their pricing and so far in my opinion, they are with my example of one.
Rectangle Font Parallel Number Pattern
Font Parallel Rectangle Number Document


A clarification update, the final bill was actually $189 as they charged twice for the same FR UPR CTRL ARM ASSY.
 

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It should also be noted that the SvC is not intended to be a profit center so if true, they should be fair in their pricing and so far in my opinion, they are with my example of one.
That's a shame to have something like this happen.

Chevy dealers are definitely standalone companies that need to make a profit. They do a free "multipoint inspect" just about every time you bring a car in for anything. Is it bad? I don't think so. They do want to find things to repair but on the other hand if something is in need of repair it's good that they found it. This does make service visits take longer than they might otherwise.

I think the $19.95 Tire Rotation and Inspection is part of that sort of logic. Of course, they also don't want something to fail after they have serviced the car and then be sued for missing something.
 

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P.S. Ventilated seats are finally coming to 3's.
It never ceases to amaze me what they can do with OTA updates. :D

Actually I did read that all Teslas are built with heated seats, and if one didn’t pay for them initially, they can be "added" later OTA. I suppose they could do the same with ventilated seats. They can activate the fans OTA. The owner just has to poke the seats full of tiny holes.

The Bolt EUV has an available opening sunroof. Now if Tesla can do that OTA, call me impressed!

All in fun. Remember, I own Tesla stock.

I really do miss the little guy holding the wrench.
 

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Isn't this an icon of Fallout?
He's the "mascot" for the Vault-Tec company that built the fallout shelter vaults in the game. Also, you can find various bobble heads in the game that boost your abilities. The wrench one boosts your repair ability. I've loved all the fallout games I've played, which is every one except the 76.
 

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He's the "mascot" for the Vault-Tec company that built the fallout shelter vaults in the game. Also, you can find various bobble heads in the game that boost your abilities. The wrench one boosts your repair ability. I've loved all the fallout games I've played, which is every one except the 76.
Clearly I haven't been playing enough video games, as I had no idea the origin. I did read the Wiki link you posted, so now I'm up to speed a little bit.

Vault Boy was one of the more interesting Avatars on this forum. Your replacement not so much. Not that my Avatar is anything to write home about, or my screen name for that matter.

I just had the new Diablo Dare sandwich from Arby's though, so I'm trying to live up to my name. It was quite good, and spicy. Soon I'll find out if it burns in both directions.🔥
 

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Two years ago, at the start of covid, I had to move out from an apartment I rented back to the house I had. Because there were no moving crew available and I didn’t want to just send the furniture into a cube and store it 240 km from home, I decided to use my Bolt EV to do it. And guess what ? It did it like a pro ! The whole one bedroom apartment furniture I transported it in 3 round trips. A full twin size bed with underneath storage I was able to transport in my Bolt EV without having the hatch open. Yes, I disassembled it but it fit ! With a Tesla I would never have been able to do this.
And by the way, I am not sure why the fanboys mention the seats of the Bolt EV and forget to mention the lack of heated steering wheal on Tesla ? That’s a no go for XXI century
I hate the fanboys as much as you, but a Tesla Y could have moved you just fine just like the Bolt, and my 2021 Y has a heated steering wheel. Since the OP's question was about a model 3, yes it is not as suitable for moving as a Bolt.

Keith
 

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I CAN tell OP that the Tesla service experience is not anywhere near the driving experience. If driving a Tesla is a hot knife through butter, getting warranty work done on a Tesla is like trying to carve a 25 pound turkey with the cheapest bendy plastic knife ever made.
Depends on where you live. I have had my homelink unit installed, and one exterior trim piece that popped loose replaced and both were painless... the same exterior trim piece has popped loose again, making it look like it is not that easy of a fix... so it may get worse on trying to repair it if the actual fender needs replaced due to bad fastener attachment points rather than the trim piece being replaced for bad fasteners.

Keith
 
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