Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
7/15/2021
Regarding charging stations and dealerships profits.

Just a few ideas to increase EV vehicle sales with a much quicker profit margin.

Considering that there is a great fear of buying an EV vehicles for several reasons:
The speed and location of the chargers, especially for the travelers.

How and where do you charge them if living in a rental, besides at home, and if I have to travel how do I find these fast charging station while taking a trip? (Without a GPS) Gas station don't need them.

Why are there not 24/7 fast charging stations at all EV (Chevy) vehicle dealerships - And even the one already installed (240v) being blocked. That is a definite negative to your sales growth. Just what do they think we are going to tell others about those inquiring minds about such things. And the word does get around. Ford dealership does the same thing. And I personally thing it is a very stupid idea, if you want to increase your sales.

Let me explain:
Owning an EV people want to get our opinions, and people who are curious about these EVs have many doubts - and when they ask us about filling up we either tell them it's a pain or try our best to give good advice. Their doubts usually end up canceling any thoughts of buying an EV.

Firstly I am not talking about the 240v chargers, The 240v charger are OK for the homes but what I am talking about the CCS, CHAdeMO, Testla, etc. fast chargers, and yes they cost a few more bucks but they are also like honey to the bee, with us EV owners. The 240v chargers are over town, but the fast chargers are much fewer.
If you think about it, the battle between the EV charging stations is growing and all the auto dealerships could completely take over and be helping their sales and customers, thus making a bigger name for themselves.
It would be a definite big boost to EV sales and the start of a new gas station replacement of the future.
The dealerships could even charge a small fee for charging similar to the way gas stations operate.
If some one was traveling from various towns they would only need to know where their (Chevy, Nissan, etc.) dealerships were located in the area that they were traveling to.

Also those not owning a home, such as those living in rental, apartments etc. Could always go to their nearest dealerships and get a complete charge in about 1/2 hour.
They might even have a small rest area inside while charging.

The first dealerships to do this will be on the top of the EV sales charts, and biggest EV dealerships around and in no time the word will get around that will be the big dog of EV sales.

Just a few ideas. Hope this has been a help.

Ray Harrilla
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
7/15/2021
Regarding charging stations and dealerships profits.

Just a few ideas to increase EV vehicle sales with a much quicker profit margin.

Considering that there is a great fear of buying an EV vehicles for several reasons:
The speed and location of the chargers, especially for the travelers.

How and where do you charge them if living in a rental, besides at home, and if I have to travel how do I find these fast charging station while taking a trip? (Without a GPS) Gas station don't need them.

Why are there not 24/7 fast charging stations at all EV (Chevy) vehicle dealerships - And even the one already installed (240v) being blocked. That is a definite negative to your sales growth. Just what do they think we are going to tell others about those inquiring minds about such things. And the word does get around. Ford dealership does the same thing. And I personally thing it is a very stupid idea, if you want to increase your sales.

Let me explain:
Owning an EV people want to get our opinions, and people who are curious about these EVs have many doubts - and when they ask us about filling up we either tell them it's a pain or try our best to give good advice. Their doubts usually end up canceling any thoughts of buying an EV.

Firstly I am not talking about the 240v chargers, The 240v charger are OK for the homes but what I am talking about the CCS, CHAdeMO, Testla, etc. fast chargers, and yes they cost a few more bucks but they are also like honey to the bee, with us EV owners. The 240v chargers are over town, but the fast chargers are much fewer.
If you think about it, the battle between the EV charging stations is growing and all the auto dealerships could completely take over and be helping their sales and customers, thus making a bigger name for themselves.
It would be a definite big boost to EV sales and the start of a new gas station replacement of the future.
The dealerships could even charge a small fee for charging similar to the way gas stations operate.
If some one was traveling from various towns they would only need to know where their (Chevy, Nissan, etc.) dealerships were located in the area that they were traveling to.

Also those not owning a home, such as those living in rental, apartments etc. Could always go to their nearest dealerships and get a complete charge in about 1/2 hour.
They might even have a small rest area inside while charging.

The first dealerships to do this will be on the top of the EV sales charts, and biggest EV dealerships around and in no time the word will get around that will be the big dog of EV sales.

Just a few ideas. Hope this has been a help.

Ray Harrilla
A few thoughts on this
1) Most EV dealers do have a DCFC, but they were installed somewhere that access to it could be controlled. These fast chargers cost anywhere from $15k-80k, depending on exactly what you get. So dealerships wanted to make sure they couldn't easily be vandalized or damaged (not forward thinking, I agree).
2) Right now, with the chip shortage, many dealers are struggling financially. Given the cost of these chargers, it is not an appealing time to add.
3) EVs are still a very small part of the market. Even with anticipated market growth, many dealers will not see significant sales in EVs.

I fully suspect that what you are suggesting will come to pass in the near future. Dealers will start adding in publicly available DCFC chargers, but just like the rest of the EV infrastructure, it will take time.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
When was the last time you went to a dealer for a gas fill up?

Charging is (generally) not a money maker. While one could make money with a large enough network of DCFC, a single unit will likely be break even at best if you charge for use, or a loser if you give it away. Same holds for L2 chargers. Unless you happen to live within walking distance, daily use of charging at a dealer is more often than not, inconvenient. I won't say there is never a good case for dealers to offer charging, in some unique cases it might make sense, but most are simply not ideal locations.

Most dealers interest in EV stops when you sign the paperwork and they make a little money on the sale. The biggest case for charging at dealers is in the service bay when you have work performed, or to keep inventory charged on the lot.

Dealers strategically located near long distance travel corridors with few choices might make a little money on DCFC. But, there are more traveler friendly locations for charging, as soon as those open, business is gone.

Most dealers see EVs as a business threat, their service departments see few EVs as the maintenance requirements are minimal. It is the manufacturers who are interested in selling EVs, not dealers who are independently owned businesses.

Would it be nice if dealers offered charging? Maybe. Is it essential or in their best interests financially? Not likely.

The most likely scenario for DCFC at dealers would be a tie up with a network operator. Manufacturers would work with network operators to put units on dealer lots, dealers would provide the space and keep the units available, the network operators would own the units and charge for use. The dealer may get an account with favorable pricing to use for inventory or service charging, and maybe to demonstrate how to use DCFC to new EV buyers. That is as close to win\win as you may get.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I imagine that with instant greed there is an error in thinking.

When you are talking about $10k to 80k to install the fast chargers, it does sound like quite a bit of money but then when you think of the cost of advertising your cars, it becomes pennies on the dollar.

Advertising done by happy EV customers is just one part of the gain in sales and opening a new door to new age EV stations.

I don't see any of the other EV fast chargers being vandalized, there just is very little to cause such a problem.

I have two EVs, one is the Chevy Bolt and the other is a Nissan Leaf - At the Nissan dealership that is 2.4 miles from my house they have a Chademo (Asian fast Charger) available 24/7. It is free and I have even saw other car manufacturers using it.

It was a selling point to me in buying my Leaf.

I am just trying to get Chevy dealerships to add this free advertising to their list of sales techniques to the benefit of their sales and their customers.

It is always scary to go out on a limb to try new things. Some times we fail and sometimes we gain.

Now I can't uses my Chevy Bolt at the Nissan charging station because we use the CCS system - so the plug-ins don't match.

I can not tell you how many times that I have used their Charger at all hours of the day and night. And while charging it, had free coffee and snacks and talked to curious people about the advantage of having such a fast charger there. Some of them were mentally debating whether to buy a ice or an EV.

Now I may be wrong - but Tesla sales were really started by having many more fast chargers everywhere. After all what is the good of having a EV if you can't recharge it? An ICE is useless with out gas or diesel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
On a completely hard capitalistic note, the dealers are missing a chance to draw customers back, have them occasionally see the new models, get approached by a salesman if the old customer does come in to "see" while the car is being charged. Small but significant captive audience. Incentives, new trade in deals - ALL - would intensify at a lower cost than TV, radio, even net ads. Like on so many topics, GM is not thinking ahead. They actually need to make each dealer a charge hub, and especially tell their old customers.

Well worth 4 to 8 DCFC at every dealer site...to get those customers from all brands into the lot.

*Well, unless they have nothing that competes with the ongoing market, and would rather charge seekers not see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I don't see any of the other EV fast chargers being vandalized, there just is very little to cause such a problem.
Vandalization on dealership lots is quite common. Of course, it will vary significantly by area, but many dealers have gates, fences, and expensive security systems to cut down on that. It is generally not publicized unless the vandalism is really bad.

I don't disagree with your desire for more dealers to offer DCFC charging on their lots, but the reality for most dealers is that they won't see the benefit. Not yet at least.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Well worth 4 to 8 DCFC at every dealer site...to get those customers from all brands into the lot.
EVERY? No way. On the coasts, where EV adoption is higher, perhaps. But given how small the market share is for EVs, I cannot imagine a cost analysis that would have be in favor of this for any small market location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I agree Terry, the benefits are a plus all around, for the customers and the dealers. That becomes hard to beat.

That is what happens at Nissan while charging. I have seen it happening, and even now, I sometimes go there to charge and get a free cup of coffee and snacks, look at the latest models, watch TV and the people there are really curious about the EVs. it is like we are a sub salesman for their electrics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Vandalization on dealership lots is quite common. Of course, it will vary significantly by area, but many dealers have gates, fences, and expensive security systems to cut down on that. It is generally not publicized unless the vandalism is really bad.

I don't disagree with your desire for more dealers to offer DCFC charging on their lots, but the reality for most dealers is that they won't see the benefit. Not yet at least.
Hi EV fan, The main reason for the gates, etc. is to prevent the stealing and damages to the vehicles. Nissan and probably other dealerships have great surveillance cameras to prevent such things - but I haven't heard of any problems with their chargers.

If you go into any new towns, etc, and if you knew that all your dealerships has fast chargers, there would be little need of a GPS/navigational system to deal with in recharging. GM itself might even pay for the chargers with their advertising money.

These are just ideas and all input is greatly appreciated. We do learn from each other.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
On a completely hard capitalistic note, the dealers are missing a chance to draw customers back, have them occasionally see the new models, get approached by a salesman if the old customer does come in to "see" while the car is being charged. Small but significant captive audience. Incentives, new trade in deals - ALL - would intensify at a lower cost than TV, radio, even net ads. Like on so many topics, GM is not thinking ahead. They actually need to make each dealer a charge hub, and especially tell their old customers.

Well worth 4 to 8 DCFC at every dealer site...to get those customers from all brands into the lot.

*Well, unless they have nothing that competes with the ongoing market, and would rather charge seekers not see.
In many areas, dealerships tend to congregate. Each having several DCFC would seem to be overkill, but pooling resources to put several DCFC units in to a centralized charging hub would make more sense. In normal times, dealer lots are filled with inventory, so charging may be a less profitable use of their real estate. But often there are less profitable businesses occupying spaces in the area that might make good candidates for DCFC hubs.

Profits are the incentive that will drive new ideas. There are no one-size fits all solutions, but as markets change, opportunities arise and innovative ideas will spring up. We are still early in the adoption phase, innovative ideas will start in places where EV adoption is father ahead.

An idea that works in one location won't necessarily make sense in all locations. For instance, Walmart and Target are sometimes located near dealers. If they already have EVGo or EA at their sites, dealers adding DCFC hubs probably wouldn't be useful. Dealers congregated a distance from travel corridors may make little sense to invest much in DCFC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,039 Posts
It's GM, not the dealers. Dealers do what GM tells them to and what GM incentivizes. Major investments in dealerships are usually mandated or encouraged by financial compensation and/or cheap financing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
I wonder if the GM partnership with EVgo might see an opportunity here. They seem focused on urban charging anyway so it could be a way to get the GM dealers access to and provide for DCFC for little more than a level 2 might cost if GM/EVgo subsidizes it. The only requirement would be that it has to be always on and accessible 24/7. No fencing, no ICEing. The dealer would "donate" the parking spots and be reimbursed for the juice until the utilization rate shows it covers the hard/soft costs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In many areas, dealerships tend to congregate. Each having several DCFC would seem to be overkill, but pooling resources to put several DCFC units in to a centralized charging hub would make more sense. In normal times, dealer lots are filled with inventory, so charging may be a less profitable use of their real estate. But often there are less profitable businesses occupying spaces in the area that might make good candidates for DCFC hubs.

Profits are the incentive that will drive new ideas. There are no one-size fits all solutions, but as markets change, opportunities arise and innovative ideas will spring up. We are still early in the adoption phase, innovative ideas will start in places where EV adoption is father ahead.

An idea that works in one location won't necessarily make sense in all locations. For instance, Walmart and Target are sometimes located near dealers. If they already have EVGo or EA at their sites, dealers adding DCFC hubs probably wouldn't be useful. Dealers congregated a distance from travel corridors may make little sense to invest much in DCFC.
You may be right ARob, but most charging station at places like Walmart are usually Type 2 (240v). They make their money by having EV ers shopping or dinning there.
Even if just one Chevy dealership in each town, might work but as the market grows with more EVs, so will the charger demand. The dealership can always charge for their use, but should be able to undercut most EV stations like EVgo, Electrify America, etc.
But if they want the free advertising they will need to bribe us owners to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
In many areas, dealerships tend to congregate. Each having several DCFC would seem to be overkill, but pooling resources to put several DCFC units in to a centralized charging hub would make more sense. In normal times, dealer lots are filled with inventory, so charging may be a less profitable use of their real estate. But often there are less profitable businesses occupying spaces in the area that might make good candidates for DCFC hubs.

Profits are the incentive that will drive new ideas. There are no one-size fits all solutions, but as markets change, opportunities arise and innovative ideas will spring up. We are still early in the adoption phase, innovative ideas will start in places where EV adoption is father ahead.

An idea that works in one location won't necessarily make sense in all locations. For instance, Walmart and Target are sometimes located near dealers. If they already have EVGo or EA at their sites, dealers adding DCFC hubs probably wouldn't be useful. Dealers congregated a distance from travel corridors may make little sense to invest much in DCFC.
I don't mind that they overlap coverage like a starbucks especially since the business model of most public stations is fewer chargers but more frequent locations than what Tesla does. Once the database of public infrastructure becomes live, in car, people should be able to know that the Walmart is full but Wahlberg Chevrolet has 2 vacant spots and it's 1/2 mile away. So in the same 1/2 mile radius circle at the main crossroads of town, there might be 20 stalls to choose from at 6 locations rather than 20 stalls at one location. Not a big deal IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's GM, not the dealers. Dealers do what GM tells them to and what GM incentivizes. Major investments in dealerships are usually mandated or encouraged by financial compensation and/or cheap financing.
I am only referring to Chevy but yes GM is the big cheese, that needs to get the message. They could could become the next Shell, Arco of the EV industry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,039 Posts
I am only referring to Chevy but yes GM is the big cheese, that needs to get the message.
I'm unclear on the whole GM/Chevy thing. Kinda like VW/Audi? It seems like most here refer to GM for just about everything so I go with the flow. But something like mandating/incentivizing expensive charging stations at "independent" dealerships would be a big deal that would have to come from the mothership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I don't mind that they overlap coverage like a starbucks especially since the business model of most public stations is fewer chargers but more frequent locations than what Tesla does. Once the database of public infrastructure becomes live, in car, people should be able to know that the Walmart is full but Wahlberg Chevrolet has 2 vacant spots and it's 1/2 mile away. So in the same 1/2 mile radius circle at the main crossroads of town, there might be 20 stalls to choose from at 6 locations rather than 20 stalls at one location. Not a big deal IMO.
Tesla didn't become so popular because of their cars, but because people saw the availability of where their cars could go.
Cars without fuel/juice aren't too much in demand. It's that easy.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
You may be right ARob, but most charging station at places like Walmart are usually Type 2 (240v)...
Most charging stations I see at Walmarts are Electrify America DCFC stations. I don't think I've ever seen a Level 2 (240 V) charging station at a Walmart.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
You may be right ARob, but most charging station at places like Walmart are usually Type 2 (240v).
I have yet to see a Walmart with L2 only. If they have charging, it is most often EA or EVGo DCFC, and sometimes J1772 in addition.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top