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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone see a problem using this adapter with a Nema 10-30 250 volt 30amp dryer outlet to charge my Bolt in conjunction with the OEM charging unit (EVSE)?

Parkworld 886344 Dryer 10-30 Plug Male to Household 5-15 (Generator 5-20) Receptacle Female Adapter Cord (ONLY Output 250 Volt)
by Parkworld
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

| 6 answered questions



Price:$49.99 & FREE Returns


Get $125 off: Pay $0.00 upon approval for the Amazon Business Prime Card. Terms apply.

  • Dryer NEMA 10-30P 250V molding male plug, 30 AMP, right angle.
  • Household regular NEMA 5-15R, 15A(Generator 5-20R, 20A) 3-prong female receptacle output 250V.
  • Used 10 AWG*3C stranded copper inner wire, support max 30 Amp overload.
  • 100% copper conductor inside, Heavy-duty power adapter cord for generator.
  • Molding plug and connector, more safe than assembly type. Length : 18 inch. Color : Black
 

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Appears that it will work with the Bolt's OEM EVSE.

@JohnU Great find. Another source for the adapter. Other sources were either out of stock or no longer being offered.
 

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NEMA 10-30 is an non-grounded 120/240V device (hot, hot, neutral). The OEM EVSE is pretty picky about ground. Will it work using neutral as ground...electrical engineers?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for responses so far guys. This would be a nice fix for me at the right price.
 

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NEMA 10-30 is an non-grounded 120/240V device (hot, hot, neutral). The OEM EVSE is pretty picky about ground. Will it work using neutral as ground...electrical engineers?
The OEM EVSE isn't as nearly picky about ground as it could be. It could make sure there is no significant potential difference between the neutral pin of the NEMA 5-15 plug and the ground pin. It appears not to do that, because it allow you to plug it into a split-phase 240-volt supply.

If it allows the neutral and hot pins to both be hot, I can't see how it could easily tell the difference between ground and neutral.

The adapter I carry in my trunk came with my JuiceBox. It has a 10-30 plug to a 14-50 outlet, and presumably connects both neutral and ground of the 14-50 to neutral on the 10-30. The JuiceBox ran just fine plugged into my dryer outlet. I haven't ever tried the OEM EVSE on that outlet, only on the real 14-50.
 

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NEMA 10-30 is an non-grounded 120/240V device (hot, hot, neutral). The OEM EVSE is pretty picky about ground. Will it work using neutral as ground...electrical engineers?
I have the 10-30 dryer setup. By code Neutral and Ground are tied together at the main electrical box. The danger is losing the neutral in the wiring between the socket and the box and the fact that neutral is designed to carry current, while Ground is a safety ground that carries no current.

Given that, I've done a bit of testing with my two EVSEs, an OEM Fiat 500e EVSE and a Bosch 30A. Both work fine on the circuit though the Bosch is running a bit overloaded.

ga2500ev
 

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You can easily make one yourself for half that cost. Everything's available at your local big box home improvement store.
Curious to try my hand at making one... I'm in the exact same situation as the OP. Are there any instructions floating around on how to make the adapter?
 

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Does anyone see a problem using this adapter with a Nema 10-30 250 volt 30amp dryer outlet to charge my Bolt in conjunction with the OEM charging unit (EVSE)?

Parkworld 886344 Dryer 10-30 Plug Male to Household 5-15 (Generator 5-20) Receptacle Female Adapter Cord (ONLY Output 250 Volt)
by Parkworld
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

| 6 answered questions



Price:$49.99 & FREE Returns


Get $125 off: Pay $0.00 upon approval for the Amazon Business Prime Card. Terms apply.

  • Dryer NEMA 10-30P 250V molding male plug, 30 AMP, right angle.
  • Household regular NEMA 5-15R, 15A(Generator 5-20R, 20A) 3-prong female receptacle output 250V.
  • Used 10 AWG*3C stranded copper inner wire, support max 30 Amp overload.
  • 100% copper conductor inside, Heavy-duty power adapter cord for generator.
  • Molding plug and connector, more safe than assembly type. Length : 18 inch. Color : Black
I don't know about "problem" -- but that's exactly how I have mine wired, for the last five years, with two different chargers (first was Schneider Electric carried by Home Depot and seems to have dropped off the map -- currently using a Cripple Creek charger based on recommendations here - so far, so good). No issues of which I'm aware -- of course - caveat with don't know what I don't know.
 

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Curious to try my hand at making one... I'm in the exact same situation as the OP. Are there any instructions floating around on how to make the adapter?
While it is possible to screw it up, it is pretty straightforward, as the technology behind it was designed a century ago when workers had a far lower level of education than is normally found today. Coming from Alabama (we sure know how to play football) even I am able to do my own wiring with a little booklet I picked up at KMart many moons ago. Basically, the 1972 vintage dryer outlet we have is three prong, as someone else mentioned. I purchased a welding extension cord, and went to the local electric supply house and said, "I need to connect these two." They sold me the two complementary gender plug/receptacles I needed, and a short run of wire, and I soon had an adapter between the welder cord and my electric dryer outlet. On the other end, I cut off the receptacle from that end of the cord, as the charger was a bare wire arrangement. The wires, in my case, were all color-coded to standard (or at least a common standard) - so I connected green to green, black to black, red-to-red, and white to white. Of course, to do this, there is some common sense required (which Samuel Clemens was famously quoted as being in short supply), such as understanding what circuits go to which breakers in the breaker box -- being able to cut power -- being able to test circuits for live voltage, and so on. This has worked just fine for me for a long time.
More recently, we drove our Bolt over 700 miles to a place that hand a marine NEMA L5-30R and my portable charger also purchased thanks to recommendations here, has a NEMA 6P-20, so knowing that, went to the same electric house, got the requisite parts, and the trip (posted elsewhere on this site) was history.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wonderful. Thanks everyone! I'm forging ahead with the adapter and will report how it works when I get it. Paying the extra money is totally worth it as this kind of DIY project is not something I enjoy, but glad to know I could do it if I needed to.
 

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Some good instructions for making your own adapters can be found here:
Make your own Bolt/Volt Adapters

I just followed those instructions to make an adapter for my wife's 2019 Bolt. I followed the instructions to make an adapter for a NEMA 14-30 and 14-50 adapter (If you remove the neutral plug - which is unused in this application, one pigtail will fit in either a 14-30 or a 14-50 outlet. If you wan tthis dual outlet capability, look for a 240V plug designed to do either style. THey come with two different neutral lugs. If you don't instll either lug, it will work in both outlets.)

I made another adapter to fit the NEMA 10-30 outlet I have in my garage for my welder.

In both cases, I started with this 120V L5-20P to 5-20R Generator Adapter. It cost about $16. I just cut off the twist-loc plug on one end, and replaced it with the desired 240V plug, following the directions in the link above. I chose this particular adapter, rather than some of the less expensive adapters with 5-15R 100 volt plugs. The 5-20R will accept either a 5-20P plug, or the common household 5-15P 120V plug. However, this adapter uses heavier-duty cord: the conductors are 10 ga. (overkill for the 12 amps drawn by the Bolts level 1 charger). The cable itself and the female plug I retained are very heavy duty, and will take more physical abuse than some of the other, less expensive adapters out there. The 10 gauge wires are a better match for the connectors on most 240V plugs, and the outer diameter of the cable fits nicely in the strain relief clamps of these plugs as well.

The original 120v end is lit when it is powered. I'm not sure how long the light will last running at 240V rather than 120V, but it's not a necessity anyway.

The adapter shown is for the NEMA 14-50 outlets common at campgrounds for the 50 amp service for larger RVs. Since the neutral pin has been removed, it will also fit into a NEMA 14-30 outlet.

27148
 

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The original 120v end is lit when it is powered. I'm not sure how long the light will last running at 240V rather than 120V, but it's not a necessity anyway.
I'd shy away from a lighted 120V connector. I installed a lighted 5-20R on my adapter and it tripped my 40A breaker when it gave up the ghost after several weeks.
 

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I'd shy away from a lighted 120V connector. I installed a lighted 5-20R on my adapter and it tripped my 40A breaker when it gave up the ghost after several weeks.
Thanks for the heads up. I'll see what happens with this one. I've got some old 120V lighted extension cords where the light is burnt out, and they still work just fine, no breakers tripping when used on 120V. If I have to replace that part of the adapter, I will.

I liked that adapter because the 10 gauge wires fit the 240v male plugs better than 12 or 14 ga wire does. If the lit end causes a problem, and I have to switch, I'll start with this adapter instead: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Cable-Generator-Adapter-L5-20P/dp/B00004SQGJ/
It's 12 ga, rather than 10 - still plenty for a Bolt charger adapter. No lighted end.
 

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That Coleman cable is what I used for mine. Works great...only slight downside is my adapter is pretty short, but I also used a bigger 14-50 end...

27151


27152
 

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Looking at it, though, seems I would be worried if it got wet.
Yeah, I was not happy with the fit of the 14-30/50 plug on the end. Back when we used to have a little pop-up camper, we'd see some of the bigger RVs using the 14-50 outlets would have a garbage bag thrown over the power outlet pedestal. When I asked why, they showed me their plug, which looked similar: not a water-tight connection around the cable. I may look for something with a better fit.

The plug I used for my 10-30P adapter looks much better. It is probably not water-tight either, but I'd bet it's "splash proof". I may throw a bit of some sort of sealant around the cable entry anyway, just to improve it a bit. The gap is really too big on my 14-30/50 adapter to just throw some sealant in (though maybe it would work - I'll have to think about that a bit.

I wonder if anyone bothers to seal the gap where the neutral pin was removed on any of these plugs?
 

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Yeah, I was not happy with the fit of the 14-30/50 plug on the end. Back when we used to have a little pop-up camper, we'd see some of the bigger RVs using the 14-50 outlets would have a garbage bag thrown over the power outlet pedestal. When I asked why, they showed me their plug, which looked similar: not a water-tight connection around the cable. I may look for something with a better fit.

The plug I used for my 10-30P adapter looks much better. It is probably not water-tight either, but I'd bet it's "splash proof". I may throw a bit of some sort of sealant around the cable entry anyway, just to improve it a bit. The gap is really too big on my 14-30/50 adapter to just throw some sealant in (though maybe it would work - I'll have to think about that a bit.

I wonder if anyone bothers to seal the gap where the neutral pin was removed on any of these plugs?
You could use this product to seal the cable entry:
 

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I wonder if anyone bothers to seal the gap where the neutral pin was removed on any of these plugs?
I put a piece of black electrical tape over the opening on ours. Ours was used in the garage, but I wanted to prevent mud dauber wasps from filling it up while sitting unused.
 
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