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I also carry the AeroVironment TurboCord (small footprint) which allows for both 120v/240v charging and some 240v adapters so that I can charge at any 240v outlet that I encounter.

This comes in handy where only 120v is available (albeit slow) or any type of 240v outlet is available such as a dryer or RV outlet.

Any port in a storm!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Just to make absolutely clear, a Tesla Destination Charger is still just a 240 VAC Level 2, not anything faster. Currently there is no way to connect a CCS equipped car like a Chevy Bolt to a Tesla Super Charger, but that is supposed to be coming someday. With the existing CCS DC fast charge networks your trip looks very doable. According to ABetterRoutePlanner.com you can make this trip in about twenty-one hours driving and seven and half hours charging, 12 stops, most about 40 minutes. It looks like mostly ElectrifyAmerica, EVGO, and ChargePoint. Unless you are planning an overnight stop at a hotel with a Tesla Destination Charger I don’t see much utility in the adapter.
BTW, I had to open A Better Route Planner in Microsoft Edge, I couldn’t get it to work in Chrome, but it used to.
I plan to make three nightly stops at hotels with charging stations. It is the Lunch Stops I have to plan carefully.
 

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I plan to make three nightly stops at hotels with charging stations. It is the Lunch Stops I have to plan carefully.
Check with the hotels (or Hotels.com) to see if they have EV charging. Even if you're sure they don't, call and ask. The more they hear requests for it, the more likely they are to install charge points in the near future.
 

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I had a conversation with a Tesla owner a couple of weeks ago, and she mentioned she has never used the SuperCharger network or even any public charging at all. She only charges at home. She had some questions about using the SuperCharger network and about a Tesla adapter to access J-1772 Level 2s, which I only know a little about, but did show interest in trying some longer trips. I suggested she simply make a little day trip to a location with a SuperCharger, charge and return just as practice. Go a short enough distance that in the event of a problem she would have enough range to get home again without charging. I would suggest the same to any EV owner contemplating their first road trip. Try it when it isn’t a challenge and see what it is actually like. Get comfortable with it, then go from there.
 

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I plan to make three nightly stops at hotels with charging stations. It is the Lunch Stops I have to plan carefully.
If it's not too much info, where are you planning our nightly stops? Again it's critical that hotel stops have available charging infrastructure such that you can recharge to 100% when you leave out. Ideally, it would be an L2 station on the hotel property. But in our last trip last month, my wife and I ended up spending a shade over an hour charging at a nearby 62.5 kW DCFC station to get the needed recharge as none of the local hotels had an available charging station.

My suggestion is that if you are planning charging around lunch and stopping overnight, it may be smarter to plan for longer midday charging sessions charging to higher states of charge.

In the end abetterroutplanner.com can still help you. Simply put in your hotel stops at waypoints, indicate you are leaving waypoints at 100% charge and see the route that it chooses for you.

I do want to warn you to pack your patience at charging stations. It's far from flawless technology at this point. I've dealt almost exclusively with Electrify America. While I've always been able to get the needed charge when I've stopped, it can be a process that has hiccups. Here are my tips:

1. The 150kW dispensers seem to be more reliable. There are 2 of them at each 4 dispenser station and one of them typically shares a cable with the Chademo cable. As such, I almost always start with dispenser #4, which is 150kW and only CCS cables.

2. Be aware that even though each dispenser has 2 cables, only one can be in operation at a time. So, if you see either cable of a dispenser plugged in to a vehicle, that dispenser is unavailable for use.

3. Go ahead and set up an account with a Pass+ membership before you leave. No point in trying to fiddle with getting an app and credit info setup while standing in the hot sun or rain at the dispenser. You'll get back your $4 for the membership with your discount on the first charge. You can cancel the Pass+ when you finish your trip.

4. If a dispenser doesn't ramp up above 30kW within a minute or so, it's likely that the dispenser is having a cooling problem with the cable. In that case switch to a different dispenser.

5. Use the app to select the charge on the station. And as an added precaution, I always press the "Continue" button on the dispenser once it starts charging.

The one true challenge with on the road charging right now is trying to figure out food. Eventually roadside restaurants will have charging stations in their parking lots as it's a natural combination. But for now, many roadside charging stations are in parking lots of Walmarts and Target stores. There may or may not be sit down dining nearby. I've personally taken to getting fast food before heading to the charging station and simply eating in the car once the charge starts. Then take a walk through the adjoining Target or Walmart for the restroom, snacks, drinks, and the like.
Also most charging stations do not have trash cans. So, there's almost always a walk to a trash can to clean out the car.

I've found most folks get frustrated because charging doesn't work like they expect it to, But if one follows the flow of the system as it is, it can be a not terribly unpleasant experience.

ga2500ev
 

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I plan to make three nightly stops at hotels with charging stations. It is the Lunch Stops I have to plan carefully.
Do not plan on using Tesla Destination Chargers to fill up while you eat lunch on a long trip. You will be there for hours adding enough kWh to make it to your next stop. Instead, find a DCFC charging station. Even if there's not a lunch option nearby, you will save time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
If it's not too much info, where are you planning our nightly stops? Again it's critical that hotel stops have available charging infrastructure such that you can recharge to 100% when you leave out. Ideally, it would be an L2 station on the hotel property. But in our last trip last month, my wife and I ended up spending a shade over an hour charging at a nearby 62.5 kW DCFC station to get the needed recharge as none of the local hotels had an available charging station.

My suggestion is that if you are planning charging around lunch and stopping overnight, it may be smarter to plan for longer midday charging sessions charging to higher states of charge.

In the end abetterroutplanner.com can still help you. Simply put in your hotel stops at waypoints, indicate you are leaving waypoints at 100% charge and see the route that it chooses for you.

I do want to warn you to pack your patience at charging stations. It's far from flawless technology at this point. I've dealt almost exclusively with Electrify America. While I've always been able to get the needed charge when I've stopped, it can be a process that has hiccups. Here are my tips:

1. The 150kW dispensers seem to be more reliable. There are 2 of them at each 4 dispenser station and one of them typically shares a cable with the Chademo cable. As such, I almost always start with dispenser #4, which is 150kW and only CCS cables.

2. Be aware that even though each dispenser has 2 cables, only one can be in operation at a time. So, if you see either cable of a dispenser plugged in to a vehicle, that dispenser is unavailable for use.

3. Go ahead and set up an account with a Pass+ membership before you leave. No point in trying to fiddle with getting an app and credit info setup while standing in the hot sun or rain at the dispenser. You'll get back your $4 for the membership with your discount on the first charge. You can cancel the Pass+ when you finish your trip.

4. If a dispenser doesn't ramp up above 30kW within a minute or so, it's likely that the dispenser is having a cooling problem with the cable. In that case switch to a different dispenser.

5. Use the app to select the charge on the station. And as an added precaution, I always press the "Continue" button on the dispenser once it starts charging.

The one true challenge with on the road charging right now is trying to figure out food. Eventually roadside restaurants will have charging stations in their parking lots as it's a natural combination. But for now, many roadside charging stations are in parking lots of Walmarts and Target stores. There may or may not be sit down dining nearby. I've personally taken to getting fast food before heading to the charging station and simply eating in the car once the charge starts. Then take a walk through the adjoining Target or Walmart for the restroom, snacks, drinks, and the like.
Also most charging stations do not have trash cans. So, there's almost always a walk to a trash can to clean out the car.

I've found most folks get frustrated because charging doesn't work like they expect it to, But if one follows the flow of the system as it is, it can be a not terribly unpleasant experience.

ga2500ev
So Far This is the three stops overnight, not going until february so time to adjust schedule.
Metropolis Ill
Cartersvilla Ga
Jennings Florida
 

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Do not plan on using Tesla Destination Chargers to fill up while you eat lunch on a long trip. You will be there for hours adding enough kWh to make it to your next stop. Instead, find a DCFC charging station. Even if there's not a lunch option nearby, you will save time.
That is absolutely on the mark. The midday charge must only be DCFC stations at 100 kW or higher power.

plugshare.com has a power filter for this. After getting an initial route from abetterrouteplanner.com, I typically will pull up the route on plugshare, set the filters to CCS only and power above 120kW, then verify that the stations on ABRP meet the criteria. One can disqualify a station on ABRP by selecting it and excluding it. ABRP will recalculate the route.

Your charges on the road are about charging efficiently, not about stopping and eating. Here's a copy of the Wall Street Journal Article of a miserable road trip due to ignorance of the charging process:


So, please focus your midday stop around the most efficient charge, and nothing else.

ga2500ev
 

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I had a conversation with a Tesla owner a couple of weeks ago, and she mentioned she has never used the SuperCharger network or even any public charging at all. She only charges at home. She had some questions about using the SuperCharger network and about a Tesla adapter to access J-1772 Level 2s, which I only know a little about...
I just rented a Tesla 3 for one week while my Bolt EV was getting its new battery rebuild.

The rental Tesla came with a small J1772 to Tesla adapter that snapped on to the end of my Clipper Creek L2 home charger and allowed me to use home charging overnight for the Tesla.

I did Supercharge once, the night of the first rental day, since it came with only 52% charged and I used it for Uber driving down to 20% and then Supercharged it up to 74% before I ended the night with more driving and charged it at home.
 

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What is the current formula for fast charging efficiency with a Bolt? I seem to recall it is something like start each day at 100% charge, drive to 30 percent then fast charge to no more than 80 percent then hit the road again. That would suggest first stop at about 150-175 miles, charge to about 80 percent then go about 115-125 miles on subsequent legs. Is that too conservative or too optimistic?
 

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Try to get a few rfid cards before you go. I've found them to maybe be the most reliable way to start a charge. If you are not in a hurry you can always consider slower roads in the direction of your travel. I take a slower road rather than risk a long no charger interstate. I've entered the final city of electron fumes. Thank goodness some new DC chargers installed at Mercedes and Hyundai.
 

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I also carry the AeroVironment TurboCord (small footprint) which allows for both 120v/240v charging and some 240v adapters so that I can charge at any 240v outlet that I encounter.

This comes in handy where only 120v is available (albeit slow) or any type of 240v outlet is available such as a dryer or RV outlet.

Any port in a storm!
I also have a portable level 2 with both plug adapters. It’s made by Shell. It’s seems pretty robust and is rated at 40 amps. I also carry a Tesla to J1772 adapter rated for 60amps for destination charging. Just to be prepared for whatever.
 

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"fast charging efficiency with a Bolt"

If possible I'd start at 100% then according to another members metrics drive faster instead of slower. Then one could go to 10-20%. I say that only if you KNOW a working charger is at that point. It might start to charge a bit slowly but quickly return to 50+. Then at some point between 50 and 80 resume.
The problem now is that many people can't plan a route to lower numbers. They have to assume trouble and charge early and charge higher. If you have time at some stop I guess you could dc charge up to 70-80 and the L2 it back to 100.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Try to get a few rfid cards before you go. I've found them to maybe be the most reliable way to start a charge. If you are not in a hurry you can always consider slower roads in the direction of your travel. I take a slower road rather than risk a long no charger interstate. I've entered the final city of electron fumes. Thank goodness some new DC chargers installed at Mercedes and Hyundai.
I all most bought a Hyundai Thinks for the info on Chargers at Mercedes and Hyundai Dealers, We have Walmart, Kohl Department Stores and Jewel Grocery stores with standard level 2 stations available. 50 miles north-west of Chicago
 

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The JDapter was the original. That is what we bought back in 2018 to work with our Tesla Gen II EVSE, at home, and on the road. It is a bit bulky, but it works fine.


This is the company that originally made parts for QG Charge, but went off on their own.


There are several more now making much more compact molded units.


Thanks Warren. I haven't seen all those in one place. I have the original J-stub and carry it all the time. I just got the Lectron to test it out for friends. I was not impressed with their technical support. They either didn't know what they were talking about or were misleading. QC Power in contrast knows their stuff.

Paul
 

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But if you have a Tesla destination charger on the route that adapter will cost $159. Hardly a good return on investment.
Most hotels that offer EV charging are often either just or mostly Tesla destination chargers.

The ROI on not having to search out an overnight charge after a long drive is the first time you use it AFAIC.

I have a Teslatap mini and a J1772 extension cable for just such occasions. The first time I stayed at the Peppermill in Reno, I found an available Tesla charger out of 4 available, and one occupied and one DNW J1772 chargers.
 

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Here is a EVSE that comes with 8 adapters

Only 700$ ?? Wow only.

Click bait

How can you need 8? It did take me 30 minutes to find the adapter I needed for a trip.


 
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