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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When ordering my Bolt, even though it was not explicitly mentioned in sales materials, I was assuming it would have an adaptive cruise control. Given the presence of features like collision detection and line assist, this sounds like a feature to expect. By "adaptive" I mean the cruise control which can slow down if a car in front of me slows down.

However, it looks this feature is not present. Any thoughts on why? Any chances of us getting it in the future via software update?
 

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That's really the only feature I miss on mine. My Outback has the "Eyesight" Adaptive Cruise and I use it all the time...except I only use the Outback on long trips : ( , where the Bolt is still ahead of the infrastructure curve here in Montana....
 

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Been debated here many times, but no explanation for the lack of this feature; many less expensive cars have had it for some years now. When most of the sensors seem to be in place on the Bolt, the lack is inexplicable.

jack vines
Basically, the necessary sensors are not in place. Cost savings and a reason to buy an upcoming GM product. Those are the reasons why.
 

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I still dont understand why the car will let you know the following distance if you cant program the cruise control to keep said distance.

Maybe they are thinking of a way to add it. But doubt it.
 

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Doubt it as well. They won't even update old Bolts to add separate heat/cooling buttons.

I'd say it was just an add-on with no additional cost to Chevy since the computer was already handling time and distance measurements for the auto-braking/alert light.
 

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I still dont understand why the car will let you know the following distance if you cant program the cruise control to keep said distance.
There's a pretty huge difference between using a camera to report an estimate and using it to apply power to drive the car and it's passengers forward at speed based on that estimate. GM is obviously not willing to take that chance - their cruise control systems all use a forward-looking radar to ensure that the car isn't being driven into something that the camera doesn't recognize as an obstacle.

There's a little "car" icon on the dash that indicates that the camera system has detected the car ahead. If you pay attention to it you'll find that it often disappears when the road takes a corner or goes over the crest of a hill. What's the cruise control supposed to do in a case like that? The only "safe" thing to do would be to have it stop the car - but that brings the risk of being hit from behind by people who aren't expecting you to stop for no obvious reason.

GM's been burnt pretty badly on safety issues before and they've vowed to clean up their act. So don't expect them to stick their neck out on this.
 

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I'm still waiting for the pony that wasn't explicitly stated in the sales materials.

Why would you assume a feature like that is included? Are you stating that the sales staff at the dealership mislead you? If so, that's something you need to take up with the dealership and possibly escalate to corporate.
 

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My personal theory is that the Bolt EV does not include a full-fledged ASCC due to the collision alert / avoidance function being reliant on the windshield-mounted camera and no other sensors. Ultrasonic sensors used for parking are only good up to around 2.5m (8 feet), so they can't be used in high-speed situations.

The Bolt EV catalog specifically mentions the camera use:
https://www.chevrolet.com/content/d...log/02-pdf/2018-chevrolet-bolt-ev-catalog.pdf
FRONT PEDESTRIAN BRAKING. At speeds up to 50 mph,
this available system uses a forward-looking camera to
survey the road ahead, flashing a warning signal and
a series of eight beeps when the vehicle is approaching
a pedestrian ahead too fast. If necessary, the system
will even automatically apply last-second braking when
traveling at low speeds.

LOW SPEED FORWARD AUTOMATIC BRAKING. Available
on Bolt EV, camera-based Low Speed Forward Automatic
Braking helps mitigate collisions with detected vehicles.
The system may even help avoid a collision at very low
speeds. The system works at speeds below 50 mph.
As described, the camera is used for automated emergency braking to to 50 mph (80km/h). Meanwhle, the cruise control can be engaged from 24 mph (39km/h) and upwards. That means Bolt EV could have had some sort of ASCC in the 24 - 50 mph range. But since cruise control is generally used for speeds exceeding 50 mph, it was too limiting.
 

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Regarding sensors, what is different from VOLT gen 2 with ACC? Does BOLT have the same front radar and camera as VOLT? As far as I remember, VOLT gen 2 ACC worked well, except if the car in front was already stopped before detected, or around sharp curves.

VOLT gen 1 had the same (or very similar) following distance indication, that we have now on BOLT, but also no ACC. ACC on VOLT gen 2 was a big deal, even though practically a standard option by then in other lines (e.g. HONDA).
 

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My personal theory is that the Bolt EV does not include a full-fledged ASCC due to the collision alert / avoidance function being reliant on the windshield-mounted camera and no other sensors. Ultrasonic sensors used for parking are only good up to around 2.5m (8 feet), so they can't be used in high-speed situations.

The Bolt EV catalog specifically mentions the camera use:
https://www.chevrolet.com/content/d...log/02-pdf/2018-chevrolet-bolt-ev-catalog.pdf

As described, the camera is used for automated emergency braking to to 50 mph (80km/h). Meanwhle, the cruise control can be engaged from 24 mph (39km/h) and upwards. That means Bolt EV could have had some sort of ASCC in the 24 - 50 mph range. But since cruise control is generally used for speeds exceeding 50 mph, it was too limiting.
But there is also:

FORWARD COLLISION ALERT. This available feature continually monitors how close your vehicle is to the vehicle in front of you. If the system determines that a front-end collision with a detected vehicle is imminent, it alerts the driver to a potential crash.

It also warns the driver if their Bolt EV is following a detected vehicle much too closely.


From personal experience, this does work at high speed.

Overall though, I think that the camera just wasn't quite reliable enough for the GM engineers to let it control the car. I have a suspicion that they actually wanted it to be good enough for adaptive cruise control, but couldn't get it reliable enough and in the end gave up on it.
 

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Regarding sensors, what is different from VOLT gen 2 with ACC? Does BOLT have the same front radar and camera as VOLT?
No, the Bolt does not have the forward-facing radar unit, and that's why Bolt owners dreaming about a software upgrade that will enable ACC are doomed to disappointment. It's the radar unit that provides positive confirmation that the car isn't going to blindly drive into some obstacle that the camera fails to identify.
 

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But there is also:

FORWARD COLLISION ALERT. This available feature continually monitors how close your vehicle is to the vehicle in front of you. If the system determines that a front-end collision with a detected vehicle is imminent, it alerts the driver to a potential crash.

It also warns the driver if their Bolt EV is following a detected vehicle much too closely.


From personal experience, this does work at high speed.

Overall though, I think that the camera just wasn't quite reliable enough for the GM engineers to let it control the car. I have a suspicion that they actually wanted it to be good enough for adaptive cruise control, but couldn't get it reliable enough and in the end gave up on it.
I agree. There's a difference between being able to issue a warning (FCA) and actually acting upon it (FAB) since the latter requires the system to be much more confident of the said action. GM has decided that this threshold for the camera-only system is 80km/h.

To note, Volt uses both camera and radar sensors to enable ACC, as per the manual:
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1138730/Chevrolet-Volt-2017.html?page=197
Adaptive Cruise Control
If equipped with Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), it allows you to select the cruise control set speed and following gap. Read this entire section before using this system. The following gap is the following time between your vehicle and a vehicle detected directly ahead in your path moving in the same direction. If no vehicle is detected in your path, ACC works like regular cruise control. ACC uses camera and radar sensors. See Radio Frequency Statement 0 351.
The missing radar sensors were perhaps a casualty of a cost-cutting measure and ultimately cost Bolt the ACC feature as the engineers couldn't come up with a satisfactory camera-only solution.
 

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Josh Tavel, Chief Engineer

"Adaptive cruise control 鈥 no, you would need the blended brakes to do that and we didn鈥檛 want to do that with this car."

And some learning for myself - one pedal it! The Bolt is not a Volt.

Bolt EV brake pedal operates hydraulic brakes and does not have a blended braking system.

And why no blended braking?

There has been complaints about what a Volt does when one front tire hits a slick surface, or you go into ABS mode. The regen shuts off completely and gives the illusion of a brake failure, which isn't what is happening.
 

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Josh Tavel, Chief Engineer

"Adaptive cruise control 鈥 no, you would need the blended brakes to do that and we didn鈥檛 want to do that with this car."

And some learning for myself - one pedal it! The Bolt is not a Volt.

Bolt EV brake pedal operates hydraulic brakes and does not have a blended braking system.

And why no blended braking?

There has been complaints about what a Volt does when one front tire hits a slick surface, or you go into ABS mode. The regen shuts off completely and gives the illusion of a brake failure, which isn't what is happening.
Way back when the discussion of the missing ACC in Bolt started many months ago, the "lack of blended braking" as the reason for the omission did come up when the quote first appeared. Not to discount the claim, as it is basically an official rationale, but it seemed strange in a way.

Now, blended braking is mixing both regenerative braking and physical braking at the same time. You reclaim as much energy as possible with regenerative braking, while the physical brakes augment the deceleration force. Manually controlled, I remember Bolt EV being able to do blended braking - try coming to a quick stop by using both the regen paddle and the brake pedal and and I think the the power level still goes into regen, meaning both are at work.

What about the autonomous control? Bolt's ability to both make use of regenerative braking to keep speed constant in the cruise mode and execute emergency braking via physical brakes show that both types of brakes are autonomously controllable. It's then a matter of whether the system is willing to apply both at the same time as needed. What I see from the quotes is that this is not the case.

But I'm still unsure as to whether the such operation is truly crucial to make "adaptive" speed control possible. Wouldn't it still be possible with "either/or" mode (i.e. non-blended braking) anyway? Then it's more of a matter of having reliable awareness of the surroundings to make the right braking decision. And since Bolt has less sensors to work with than Volt, it's reasonable to suspect that the final decision swung to not including the ACC, to err on the side of safety.
 

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Again, this discussion is picking the technical flyshit out of the BEV pepper. There's only one reason such a common feature on ICEs costing $10,000 less isn't included - cost-cutting to maintain the desired MSRP.

Same reason the Bolt didn't get power memory seats and mirrors and several other small bells and whistles; the MSRPs were hard targets and the expensive battery ate all the small bits.

I've never owned a perfect car, but the Bolt comes closest.

jack vines
 
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