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Eric (News Coulomb) does a nice job of addressing the top myths of the Bolt in this recent article
 

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"myths" 7, 8, and 9 are poorly addressed. He pretty much framed the answers in B.S.

** I do NOT think that "(#7) The Chevy Bolt EV is a City Car". It has a range of 200+ miles, and is just fine for trips of 300-400 miles, longer if you are planning on overnighting somewhere and will start the morning with a full charge. However, it is one of the last BEVs I would choose for a 1000+ mile, 2 day trip. (I would pick it before the LEAF2, however.) It does have one of the slowest fast-charge rates of 2019+ BEVs.

Also, using the EA network as "hey the charging network is just fine - look at all those dots on the map!" is ... well, being a bit of a Pollyanna. While there are lots and lots of sites installed, "hey, I drove up and had no problems - the first charger I tried to use worked just great" is far from the most common type of plugshare post concerning EA sites. I certainly hope that it will be "problem solved" in 6-9 months, but for now the experience seems to be "I tried a bunch of chargers, finally got one to work after calling EA and having them reboot the unit remotely". (Thankfully, in CA, there are so many other DCFCs available, overlapping zones, that EA charging sites are often not the "single point of failure" for a trip.)

8. Myth: The Chevy Bolt EV’s Charging Taper Is More Aggressive than In Other EVs

This is a "myth" chosen to make a point by the author. Nobody cares (well, nobody should care) what the "taper rate" is. What they care about is how quickly the battery can be refilled. The "myth" seems to have been chosen so he could write : " the Bolt EV’s first charging rate stepdown occurs at around 50% battery (from 55 kW down to about 38 kW), the Tesla Model 3 will still be charging faster. The problem is, the Tesla Model 3 was charging faster to begin with. So yes, while the Model 3 LR would still be charging at 90 kW when the Bolt EV first steps down to 38 kW, that 90 kW actually represents a larger drop off from the Model 3 LR’s peak charging rate of 250 kW. So in reality, the Tesla Model 3 actually has an even more significant charging rate taper than the Bolt EV." People don't care about the taper percentage. What they care about is that when the Bolt is chuffing to add 38 kW, the other cars (Tesla yes, but also eTron, iPace, Taycan ...) are shoving electrons in at a faster rate (just as they were BEFORE the taper). (Disclaimer: I do not now, nor have I ever, owned a Tesla.) The Tesla M3 (the car HE chose to bring up) fills up at well over twice the miles per half-hour at each and every 'equivalent' level of SoC (say, both at 45% SoC). Well, actually, I haven't really paid any attention to "over 85%", so maybe not EVERY SoC.

"How quickly can I get back on the road with an extra 150 miles in the tank" is the issue, not "what percentage slower is my car filling now than when the battery was almost empty".

There was a lot of self-serving Bolt "fan boy" in that "myth debunking".

Ditto : The Chevy Bolt EV Takes a Longer to Charge Than Other EVs

This time he uses "% of battery filled" hand-waving, comparing the Bolt to cars with much smaller battery packs, such as the SparkEV and Hyundai Ioniq Electric (which are NOT good EVs for road trips). More BS. The real question is "how long does it take me to add 150 miles" (or 125, or 175, ...) and the Bolt is slower than most. Fact.

And bringing up how long the battery will last has NOTHING to do with debunking the slower speed of charging "myth" (which isn't a myth - it's a fact). It does relate to WHY the Bolt charges more slowly - because Chevy did it on purpose to prolong battery life. Arguing that they did it on purpose, then arguing that it really isn't slower at all is just more "fan boy" rhetoric. (and completely lacking in logic.)

"Most modern electric vehicles, though, require about 30 to 40 minutes for their most productive charging sessions, and the Bolt EV falls right into that window." - yeah, but the Bolt's "most productive" is either 38 or 54 kW, while the model 3's "most productive" is over 90 kW - always. So, yes Dorothy, the Bolt does take significantly longer to charge enough to drive another 125 miles than some other BEVs (not all, by any means, but it is one of the slowest).

----> Now, I think the Bolt is a great car overall, and since I rarely drive more than 400 miles in a day (****, I drive 200+ miles in a day fewer than 10 days out of the year), the Bolt fits my lifestyle just fine. But I don't have to pretend that the Bolt is capable of handling every usage situation, or the best choice for every type of driver. My personal belief is that the Bolt is not the best choice for someone who is often driving 350-400+ miles a day. A much better choice for a person driving SF-San Diego twice a month would be an EV that will recharge the battery at 150+ kW, so that 150-ish miles can be added in 15-20 minutes (instead of the Bolt's 90 miles in 30 minutes).

Edit: (very late edit) : Of course, in order to get a car which charges at 150+ kW, you are probably going to spend a LOT more money than you would if you bought a Bolt ...
 

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I appreciate your attempt at objectivity SparkE, as always. Your criticism of Eric is the sort I'm often engaged with him about, along with my point that misrepresenting something as being better suited than it might actually be does a disservice to potential customers. As we all know, it's better to under promise and over deliver, because it's expectation that frames our experience. A drawback isn't so bad when we anticipate it, and finding that a drawback wasn't as bad as we anticipated results in a positive experience.

Eric intends well and often brings up good points, but doesn't hold objectivity as most important, but instead holds it at a slightly lower level than cause.
 

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Wow, SparkE's comment brought back shivers of when he used to try and pull that BS here. I can't say I'm surprised, just disappointed that he's still distorting the data for his own confirmation bias agenda. I'll stop now before I get my third strike.
 

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I actually never heard most of those myths before. I think the article is more entertainment than useful. The range of the Bolt goes down to 150 in my climate and at high speeds the efficiency turns to pure crap. I still love the car, but you can't dismiss what 75mph or 80 does to your range or what a 15 degree day with using the heater does. That will change your outlook on the question about driving it long distances where there is no good infrastructure. I'm still learning, I'm going to always be thankful at what the car has taught me as I evolve and the industry does as well.
 

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Cold regions really need heat pumps (reverse A/C)... That was one reason I hesitated on the Bolt. Still glad I got it, though. :)
If I knew then, what I know now about how the Bolt's range is impacted in the winter in WI. And that my state is horrible in charging infrastructure .... I'd have bought a Tesla. Not because it's a better car. We all have our own opinions. But that darn Super Charger network is pretty awesome here in WI. I have NO idea what it's like elsewhere. I am very happy with my Bolt. I will miss it when I park it in the inner city in a couple years, set ablaze and reported stolen.
 

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I will miss it when I park it in the inner city in a couple years, set ablaze and reported stolen.
Now, now... Can’t you just drive it into a lake or something thereabouts? Lest a “Bolt fire” suddenly becomes a thing...
 

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If I knew then, what I know now about how the Bolt's range is impacted in the winter in WI. And that my state is horrible in charging infrastructure .... I'd have bought a Tesla. Not because it's a better car. We all have our own opinions. But that darn Super Charger network is pretty awesome here in WI. I have NO idea what it's like elsewhere. I am very happy with my Bolt. I will miss it when I park it in the inner city in a couple years, set ablaze and reported stolen.
X2 - but everything depends on individual needs and wants and use. We don't road trip our Bolt, so range is moot. However, when we do road trip with a family member who has a Tesla M3, the supercharger infrastructure and the rapid charge makes Tesla the only feasible option.

Having said that, for our daily urban use, I wouldn't trade straight across our $43,000 Bolt for his $50,000 M3. The Bolt is the far better errand running and urban assault vehicle.

jack vines
 

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I am very happy with my Bolt. I will miss it when I park it in the inner city in a couple years, set ablaze and reported stolen.
Back in the bad old 1970's before NYC became a safe tourist destination, if you were looking to lose a car... you just drove it to the Bronx and got out (and quickly in to your buddy's waiting car) . Within an hour that car was stripped down to the bare frame!



27566
 

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X2 - but everything depends on individual needs and wants and use. We don't road trip our Bolt, so range is moot. However, when we do road trip with a family member who has a Tesla M3, the supercharger infrastructure and the rapid charge makes Tesla the only feasible option.

Having said that, for our daily urban use, I wouldn't trade straight across our $43,000 Bolt for his $50,000 M3. The Bolt is the far better errand running and urban assault vehicle.

jack vines
Well said. I only really use the Bolt as a commuter car because I think that's what it is. You could drive it cross country, but that's not what I would do but enjoy reading about those that do here. It's entertaining. When I bought the car, I was naive. I didn't understand the impact of cold weather. I didn't realize that doing freeway speeds would exponentially kill range and I took the range at face value. I didn't do the normal research I usually do. I can't imagine, and quite frankly might end my life at the prospect of taking a 600 mile trip in a Bolt, but I would like to make a near 200 mile trek up north (one way) with it over the winter holidays. In my climate, the Bolt can't do it well, and to make things even worse .... my geographical area has horrible DCFC coverage. Going north of me by 30 miles, only 1 DCFC for those that do .... and it is free which is awesome .... but it's 24kW which is nice, but just shy of awesome. I want to destination charge. So I don't DCFC and if I did, I am not going to sit there for 40 minutes to get an 80% or whatever it is that one gets on that. The price of the M3 for me, with all the tech, bells and whistles and auto drive $43K on the phone and $45K online (no tax credit). I'm the minority on this site and value the tech fairly high and I'll pay for it. My only complaint is the same as many; Range. But not the summer range ..... it's the winter range that got me. Take that issue away, and the Bolt is amazing. And yes, I know, weather impacts all EV's .... it's the battery not the car. But when I bought the Bolt, I also 'bought' the infrastructure the community has built and I naively assumed that it was as robust as Tesla's. I didn't do my homework.
 

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In 5 years, the Tesla supercharger network might be looking a bit restrictive, given the new CCS L3 chargers coming online. Currently, a Tesla certainly is usually easier to road-trip in many areas, but that will change. As for the heater, at the time the Bolt was designed, auto heat-pumps didn't work very well in cold weather. Just ask Leaf owners about that. Chevy wanted the Bolt to be useable in cold climates, so they went with the resistive heating. On a recent trip at 34 degrees and with the climate control set on auto at 68 degrees, I still got 3.9 miles/kwh. I know that Minnesota can get much colder, but mileage is greatly affected by how a car is driven. Cold weather will also affect gas cars. My 4x4 pickup will get 21 mpg on a trip in the summer. In winter around town, it probably gets 12, maybe. Of course, I don't drive it much now that I have my Bolt. I do road trip my Bolt, some. Did 285 miles to the coast and back, without charging. Did about a 330 mile trip to Eastern Oregon (had to sit at an L2 charger for 5 hours! :mad:) and plan to take some 1-2000 mile trips in the coming year.
 

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"In 5 years, the Tesla supercharger network might be looking a bit restrictive..."

I doubt it - Tesla constantly improves the network and has about a 5 year head start.
 

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"In 5 years, the Tesla supercharger network might be looking a bit restrictive..."

I doubt it - Tesla constantly improves the network and has about a 5 year head start.
Yeah, Eric is known to talk about how CCS is going to surpass Tesla (now he predicted). Not only does Tesla have a head start, but they have the proper motivation to keep improving their network. It's integral to their business model and nobody else claims ownership of it. EA on the other hand is the result of fulfilling punitive punishment to VW. They don't have the same motivation or imperative for the network to be good. VW doesn't want to be in the charger business because it isn't profitable.

What indication do we have that CCS is going to surpass Tesla's network all things considered?
 

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How the CCS charging network will compare with the Tesla supercharger network in the future is all speculation. It just seems to me that with many more car manufacturers creating more BEV models, many more than Tesla can hope to match, the need for a greatly expanded charging network to support those new models will compel either independent companies or auto manufacturers to build out the charging network at an increasing rate, independent of any punitive funding efforts. But, it's all speculation on everyone's part. It just seems reasonable to me. Tesla really can't fight the entire world.
 

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How the CCS charging network will compare with the Tesla supercharger network in the future is all speculation. It just seems to me that with many more car manufacturers creating more BEV models, many more than Tesla can hope to match, the need for a greatly expanded charging network to support those new models will compel either independent companies or auto manufacturers to build out the charging network at an increasing rate, independent of any punitive funding efforts. But, it's all speculation on everyone's part. It just seems reasonable to me. Tesla really can't fight the entire world.
Yes, all speculation but fun to ponder at least.

It seems reasonable to think other manufacturers combined EV sales will surpass Tesla's, but that remains to be seen. So far this year, Tesla has 135,700 US sales to the entire rest of the industries 100,300. Some of those cars use the 3rd charging protocol, Chademo. You've got 2 open protocols battling it out in a smaller market segment, meanwhile Tesla controls its own charging destiny.

There is no money in charging infrastructure, so who is going to build it once VW has completed their obligation? Charging infrastructure requires 8hr use for each and every charger, each and every day to simply break even. Manufacturers won't touch it, and the existing players are struggling. The government would have to fund such an infrastructure buildout, but they wouldn't do so at the expense of Tesla, or other charging protocols. It isn't their job to decide which plug works with your cell phone, so why should they be concerned with EVs?

I find it reasonably likely that CCS will disappear, possibly with Tesla becoming the industry standard, Chademo, or some other protocol not yet known to me. I don't see 3 standards existing long term (maybe 2), and I don't see Tesla going anywhere.
 

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How the CCS charging network will compare with the Tesla supercharger network in the future is all speculation. It just seems to me that with many more car manufacturers creating more BEV models, many more than Tesla can hope to match {...}

Tesla really can't fight the entire world.
Well, Tesla is currently selling way more BEVs than the total of EVERY OTHER manufacturer added together. Until car companies start producing reasonably low-cost BEVs in quantity (priced like the Bolt or the LEAF, but with at least 3 times the sales) Tesla will continue to outsell everybody else. The number of eTrons, iPaces, i3s, and other Taycans is not going to be huge. Models like the Ioniq, Soul, Niro, Kona are going to have to be sold en masse for the ratio to change. At the moment, the 4 cars I mentioned appear to be limited to CARB states only, and in small quantity. Frankly, I think that VW is going to be the one to ramp up affordable BEV U.S. sales before any of the other "traditional" vendors. Their ID.3 (not to be sold in the US, but started production this month for European sales, I hear) and the ID.4 (which will be sold in the US starting in 2020, supposedly in quantity) are their make-or-break EV models. They are really talking them up. 10 years from now, they will be looking at that very scary 'cliff', that point where they won't be able to sell any more ICE vehicles in most of Europe.

BTW, I will not be surprised if the ONE MONTH Sep 2019 U.S. sales of the model 3 are larger than the annual sales of any other BEV sold in the U.S. in 2019. At the moment, only the Bolt looks like it might catch up (for 2019).

2ndly, Tesla isn't fighting anyone. Tesla fan boys are creating a stink, as are Bolt fan-boys in the other direction.
 

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It isn't their job to decide which plug works with your cell phone, so why should they be concerned with EVs?
(( Ha! We posted within a minute of one another! ))
Concerning your "plug for cell phone" comment ...

Amusingly, the EU did pretty much that several years ago (cell phones). They pushed out the equivalent of "an executive order" (it wasn't that at all, but it would have become law) for cell phone companies that was basically: "this 'everybody with their own charging protocol and plug' is pure B.S. You all come to an agreement about the SINGLE plug/standard for charging cell phones or WE will do it for you. You know how crappy it will be if a committee designs it, so ... you have 18 months to fix it on your own, then we do it."

Not surprisingly, all the the cell phone companies came to an agreement on charging. They picked micro-USB. (Apple met the letter of the law by shipping a small "plug in converter" with each phone where one end had an Apple plug to go in the phone, and the other end was a micro-USB socket.)
 

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Cold regions really need heat pumps (reverse A/C)... That was one reason I hesitated on the Bolt. Still glad I got it, though. :)
Heat pumps don't work at all well when the temperature is below freezing, and not at all below zero. That's why every home that heats with a heat-pump also has a "second-stage" hot-wire heater, to cover for when the heat-pump can't do the job. A heat-pump is efficient when it can be used, but that does not really include Cold weather.
 
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