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Discussion Starter #1
Stumbled upon an article published 1/30/2018 in, of all places, a Middle East Automotive, Tires & Parts News source.

I had posted some time ago trying to validate a rumor regarding the 2019 Bolt and perhaps it having a larger (80kW) battery. Since that time it really seems like the 2019 Bolt will likely retain the 60kW battery (but perhaps the software may be tweaked to squeeze out another 20 Miles or so)

...Then I read this:
General Motors Middle East recently conducted a road trip that covered 1,750 kilometers to showcase the versatility and the 500 km plus range of the 2019 Chevrolet Bolt.
Just to confirm my math, google says: 500 kilometres = 310.686 Miles

Another section of the article says:
The vehicle stopped for recharging and then went on the nearly 400km run to Sohar in Oman, tackling both city driving and long stretches on the highway with equal eases.
(400km = 248.548 miles)

The article does suggest this was accomplished with a "60kWh battery pack". The story ends with this statement again:
Range anxiety need no longer be a concern with the Bolt EV’s 500km-plus driving range.
here is the article: Long Road Trip by Chevrolet Bolt EV Showcases its Range
 

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I believe this is just a difference in how the EU measures range compared to the EPA.

The Ampera-E is the same as the Bolt but it's rated at 520km by the NEDC.
 

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I believe this is just a difference in how the EU measures range compared to the EPA.

The Ampera-E is the same as the Bolt but it's rated at 520km by the NEDC.
That makes sense. But aren't there some laws of physics being broken? :|
Does converting km to miles not mean the same thing there?
 

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That makes sense. But aren't there some laws of physics being broken? :|
Does converting km to miles not mean the same thing there?
The range of a vehicle (ICE or EV) depends on a variety of factors - outside temperature, heating/AC use, terrain, driving style, etc. In southern California I can easily get >280 miles on a full charge right now; I see people in Canada getting <150 miles/charge. So what is the actual range of the Bolt?

The EPA has a set of tests that define specific speeds, acceleration, HVAC settings, distances, and timelines for difference scenarios and combines them into a single number - 238 miles.

The EU has a different set of test parameters and they get 520km. Obviously this is unrealistic, which is why there's a new test standard, WLTP, under development. But NEDC is still the standard so manufactures will continue to advertise those ridiculous numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hummm... So the article is conflating two specifications;

1.) The NEDC estimated range. Where they state the "500 km plus range of the 2019 Chevrolet Bolt"

2.) The actual observed range. " 400km (249 miles) run to Sohar" in Oman" on a single charge - where depending on conditions, any Bolt can make that run.

Got it.
Which seems to indicate the 2019 Bolt will retain the same battery and range.
 

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Does converting km to miles not mean the same thing there?
Here in Canada the official estimated range of the Bolt is 383 km, which is the same as the 238 mile rating issued by the EPA.

The difference in Europe is due to a claim. It means you have to take any EV news out of Europe that mentions ranges with a huge grain of salt.
 

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Have there not been many in the USA, some reporting here in the CBF, who have gotten 300 miles on a single charge (5 miles per kWh) in the 2017 Bolt? I do not know how long in miles the standard testing is, but depending on how much of that distance is allowed to be done at, or under, 30 mph, you can spend more time getting 5mi/kWh. I once went the 7 miles to work at >5mi/kWh, but usefulness and range are intersecting slopes.
 

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Several comments on this forum and some other places suggest the 2019 Bolt will have a battery upgrade, increasing the range. Some said the energy capacity would increase from 60 kWh to 75 kWh. At least one web article suggested this would be achieved by improvements in the batteries, not simply adding more batteries.

This web article suggests increased range will be achieved through an 'upgraded powertrain'. This could be improvements in the motor, a change in the speed reduction or something else.

http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/chevrolet/chevrolet-bolt-ev/2019-chevrolet-bolt-ev/

In any case, the release of the 2019 Bolt is a long way off: the earliest likely date is the summer of 2019, or about 17 months. The Bolt is built in low volumes by Detroit standards: just 3,000 cars a month. Also, over half of the value of the components in the car aren't made by Chevy (sole sourced from LG), so it's difficult for them to leverage profits. It's not cost-effective for Chevy to pump a bunch of time or money into developing it.
 

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Several comments on this forum and some other places suggest the 2019 Bolt will have a battery upgrade, increasing the range. Some said the energy capacity would increase from 60 kWh to 75 kWh. At least one web article suggested this would be achieved by improvements in the batteries, not simply adding more batteries.

This web article suggests increased range will be achieved through an 'upgraded powertrain'. This could be improvements in the motor, a change in the speed reduction or something else.

http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/chevrolet/chevrolet-bolt-ev/2019-chevrolet-bolt-ev/

In any case, the release of the 2019 Bolt is a long way off: the earliest likely date is the summer of 2019, or about 17 months. The Bolt is built in low volumes by Detroit standards: just 3,000 cars a month. Also, over half of the value of the components in the car aren't made by Chevy (sole sourced from LG), so it's difficult for them to leverage profits. It's not cost-effective for Chevy to pump a bunch of time or money into developing it.
The 2019 Bolt will go into production this summer.
 

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The 2019 Bolt will go into production this summer.
Yeah. That is bizarre. There are 2017's, sitting on lots in Virginia, that were built in late 2016, and by mid-summer they will be three marketing years old. At this rate, they will be talking about the "second generation" Bolt before the first handful built are sold.
 

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Yeah. That is bizarre. There are 2017's, sitting on lots in Virginia, that were built in late 2016, and by mid-summer they will be three marketing years old. At this rate, they will be talking about the "second generation" Bolt before the first handful built are sold.
Are you sure those 2016 builds are actually on the dealer lots? Could be they were just not updated in the dealer's inventory system and they are long gone.

Even if they are still there, I'm sure GM will eventually provide enough incentives to get those Bolts off the lot. Odds are they don't have DCFC and are LT trim I bet.

Once the 2019 Bolt is released, it will be "on schedule" as far as MY changeovers. Typically, GM does the changeover in the summer. The Bolt was released in December, so we had an extra-long 2017 MY.
 

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Are you sure those 2016 builds are actually on the dealer lots?
Yes. Still there. The twin to ours is an LT, DC fast charge port and heated seats and wheel, just like ours. They have been slowly whittled away at the pile they started with. I suspect they sold a few that were ordered to customer specs.
 

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I believe this is just a difference in how the EU measures range compared to the EPA.

The Ampera-E is the same as the Bolt but it's rated at 520km by the NEDC.
I believe this is the case. Their method always seems to predict much better efficiency.
On ICE cars at least, the European cycle is quite a bit slower in both speed and acceleration/deceleration.
 

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Several comments on this forum and some other places suggest the 2019 Bolt will have a battery upgrade, increasing the range. Some said the energy capacity would increase from 60 kWh to 75 kWh.
Something tells me that these rumours stem from the above-mentioned report that refers to the European NDEC range, which is highly overinflated compared to the EPA range. And then wild speculation as to how this supposed "increase" in range might have been achieved.
 
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