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And bulkier. The standard range Model 3 in China, and now Europe, is LiFePO. It is the same size and weight as the long range battery, but only two thirds the capacity.
I remember reading the LiFePo battery (CATL??) is around 250 w/kg. I don't know the wh/l compares on the two battery chemistries. The w/kg is comparable to Tesla's Panasonic batteries. While LiFePo was less energy dense in the past CATL continued to work on it and improve it. I believe it is actually cheaper, safer, and longer lasting than regular li-ion batteries. And the battery doesn't care if you charge it to 100% every night.

What I am unaware of is why it is not more widely used.
 

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I believe it is actually cheaper, safer, and longer lasting than regular li-ion batteries.

What I am unaware of is why it is not more widely used.
This has always been true.

It is still bulkier than the alternatives, as proven by the Model 3 example.
 

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This has always been true.

It is still bulkier than the alternatives, as proven by the Model 3 example.
With more charging sites now and more every month, slightly lower range is not an issue.
 

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https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2020/RCSB-20V701-5306.pdf lists P0BBD as being a new one. Above it, it also says "Revise existing Hybrid/EV Battery Circuit Performance DTCs P0B3C, P0B41, etc. " Unfortunately, the bulletin doesn't have the complete list and what they revised in those. I'd imagine those would be in an updated service manual.
Bolt EV Battery Cell Inspection – TechLink explains the new DTC.
The new calibration installed during reprogramming includes two new diagnostics:
  • Sustained cell delta voltage monitor
  • Intermittent cell delta voltage monitor
Existing DTCs are being repurposed for the sustained cell delta voltage monitor, with one DTC for each of the 96 cell groups. A new DTC, P0BBD, is being added to the Bolt EV for the intermittent cell delta voltage monitor. These diagnostics run in the HPCM2 module. If either of these two new diagnostics set, the vehicle will stop charging and not be allowed to start on the next key cycle. Refer to the appropriate Service Information for details on how to diagnose these new DTCs.

The new module calibrations also allow for the use of a mixture of N2.1 and N2.2 cell chemistry battery sections in 2017-2019 Bolt EVs. With this change, a new N2.2 battery section (row) may now be used to service these older vehicles. The EV range will not increase with the use of the newer chemistry. Range is limited by the lowest capacity cell in the pack.
 

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Any update on May 1 fire? Chevy so far refusing my buyback, but if this story pans out they may change their position
 

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Nah. That is what the update is for. Now if they have one burn after the final update, we may all be getting a buyback.
Yeah, if this update doesn't work, should follow path of Hyundai.
 

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Nah. That is what the update is for. Now if they have one burn after the final update, we may all be getting a buyback.
If the horn beeps before it burns, would that hurt buyback chances? <g> They could say "We warned you it was about to burn."
 

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A few rumors about that some cars are warning/bricking and needing to be towed to a dealer and finding there is a battery issue with module(s) needing replacing. So the software appears to be working to at least mitigate the fire risk.
 

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A few rumors about that some cars are warning/bricking and needing to be towed to a dealer and finding there is a battery issue with module(s) needing replacing. So the software appears to be working to at least mitigate the fire risk.
My theory of the root cause is tied to the shift of battery production from Korea to MI in mid 2019. Most of the reported fires appear to be 2019 or late 2018 model year Bolts. You can imagine to morale at the Korean plant when the workers were told their jobs would be discontinued in a few months.

What I have witnessed is my EVSE began reporting 4 hours of charging following the update, but kWh nearly matching what I had used the previous day(s) which should have only required 30 minutes or less to recover. I use HT Reserve, so not charging to 100%. On a couple of colder nights, the charger reported 15-30 minute sessions, but on warmer nights, 4 hours, almost consistently. That tells me that in addition to the diagnostics in the update, BMS is doing more conditioning following charging where heat builds up. The analysis of the fires seems to suggest charging in the hours before the fires broke out may have started the runaway thermal conditions, so cooling the packs following charging would presumably treat that condition before it becomes a runaway problem.

I am reasonably confident GM won't see a repeat of the Hyundai fiasco.
 

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4 hours, almost consistently. That tells me that in addition to the diagnostics in the update, BMS is doing more conditioning following charging where heat builds up.
Did you look at this "conditioning" with Torque Pro? Every single charge to hilltop, since the final update has had our EVSE on for four hours. The only thing going on during that time has been trickle charging of the 12 volt battery.

 

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Discussion Starter · #214 ·
What I have witnessed is my EVSE began reporting 4 hours of charging following the update, but kWh nearly matching what I had used the previous day(s) which should have only required 30 minutes or less to recover. I use HT Reserve, so not charging to 100%. On a couple of colder nights, the charger reported 15-30 minute sessions, but on warmer nights, 4 hours, almost consistently. That tells me that in addition to the diagnostics in the update, BMS is doing more conditioning following charging where heat builds up. The analysis of the fires seems to suggest charging in the hours before the fires broke out may have started the runaway thermal conditions, so cooling the packs following charging would presumably treat that condition before it becomes a runaway problem.
If it was conditioning, you'd see kWh go up. That's an energy-intensive thing to do.

We know that the computers will continue to monitor the battery for "up to 12 hours" after charging is complete, with power being provided by the APM via the L2 OBCM. That's why you see your EVSE still active after charging complete. It's not conditioning.
 

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Newbie here (our 2021 is only 2 weeks old)....
Apologies if digressing here to something probably covered elsewhere in the forum :
Not to minimize the seriousness , but is my understanding that this risk is eliminated complely as far as anyone knows for Bolts of the 2020 model year and newer correct?

Alex
Not entirely there are 2020 get on fire
 
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