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The only common items between the Tesla Model 3 and the Chevy Bolt EV is that they have four wheels and use electricity. They are designed for different purposes. Same as when the Chevy Volt was compared with the Nissan Leaf.

Now if GM made a new BEV in the Cruze body, then there may be a better comparison since both are compact sedans. The Bolt EV is a small CUV and rides taller, making it better for older adults and seniors, who have more money and more buying power.
 

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The only common items between the Tesla Model 3 and the Chevy Bolt EV is that they have four wheels and use electricity. They are designed for different purposes. Same as when the Chevy Volt was compared with the Nissan Leaf.

Now if GM made a new BEV in the Cruze body, then there may be a better comparison since both are compact sedans. The Bolt EV is a small CUV and rides taller, making it better for older adults and seniors, who have more money and more buying power.
Disagree, the comparison is natural as they are the first two BEVs with a >200 mile range priced in the same zip code (maybe area code) as vehicles of the same size with the same features. In essence they are the first "usable" EVs that "regular" car buyers can aspire to.

I doubt that many Bolt buyers wouldn't have cross shopped against a Model 3 if you could just walk into a Tesla store and buy one as easily as you can a Bolt.
 

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The only common items between the Tesla Model 3 and the Chevy Bolt EV is that they have four wheels and use electricity.
The Model 3 and the Bolt share the two most important EV characteristics of all: they both have a similar range and they both have a similar perceived price ("perceived" because it's still impossible to get a base Model 3).
 

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The Model 3 was certainly my first choice. I had a reservation in for a Model 3 since April 5 2016, then about a month ago I drove one and liked it. But, being in Alabama {not a Tesla hotspot} and not willing to pony up the extra money to buy the "First Available" Model 3 put the expected delivery point well past the expectation of the $7500 tax credit. Maybe 1/2 or 1/4 credit by the time I could buy standard range. I very much like Tesla's Mission Statement aka Master Plan and wanted to support them, but in the end, a deep discount on a left-over 2017 Bolt plus the $7500 tax credit overrode my desire to buy the Model 3.

Maybe next time.
 

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Disagree, the comparison is natural as they are the first two BEVs with a >200 mile range priced in the same zip code (maybe area code) as vehicles of the same size with the same features. In essence they are the first "usable" EVs that "regular" car buyers can aspire to.

I doubt that many Bolt buyers wouldn't have cross shopped against a Model 3 if you could just walk into a Tesla store and buy one as easily as you can a Bolt.
I think this is a good observation. If one looks at the buying trends for the past three years, the sports sedan market has fallen flat on it's face. The BMW-3 Series, C-Class Benz, Audi A4, and the Cadillac ATS sales have nearly dropped in half; all are excellent cars. The brand new (to the US) Alfa Giulia barely even sells. While at the same time the sales of CUVs and small SUVs are nearly double. The Bolt being a CUV is in the market at the right time with the right vehicle format regardless of its architecture. From a market perspective the Bolt is positioned nearly perfectly, and this wasn't by accident. Tesla's Model 3 has a cult following because (a) its owner is active on social media - I'd bet 3/4 of Bolt owners do not know who Mary Berra is, nor her relationship with General Motors, nor her involvement with the creation of the Volt, (b) its owner is good at hype - 400,000 crowd-funding pre-orders, (c) Tesla has no 100+ year quality history to overcome (like GM does) so Tesla being error prone is overlooked. Had GM rolled out the Bolt in the fashion that Tesla has, it would have been laughed right out of the industry. Had GM blamed its supplier of production-line robotic assembly cells, good Lord, what such an amateur move was that! One flaw I see with the Bolt is GM relied too much on a Korean design influence because the Bolt's front seats are not what you find in a typical GM product.
 

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IMO the two significant advantages the Model 3 has over the Bolt are access to the Supercharger network and Autopilot. Either or both will no doubt be compelling to some (but not all) buyers.
Again, I see the supercharger network as more hype. It still is no substitute for the refueling convenience that ICE has over any EV regardless of range. It still limits Teslas to predetermined routes.
 

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Again, I see the supercharger network as more hype. It still is no substitute for the refueling convenience that ICE has over any EV regardless of range. It still limits Teslas to predetermined routes.
Agree. On the I-95 corridor, there are plenty of CCS DCFCs to cover most of my roadtrip needs.

And I am not interested in AP at all. ;)
 

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Raitchison posted: "...I doubt that many Bolt buyers wouldn't have cross shopped against a Model 3 if you could just walk into a Tesla store and buy one as easily as you can a Bolt..."

Actually my wife had a chance back in January to take my Model 3 reservation (after I purchased a used S), but opted instead for a Bolt. She transitioned from a Honda Fit and wanted a similar body style for her EV. She had many other reasons for not wanting a Tesla, most of them having to do with the high tech nature of the 3's interior - hates display screens, wants knobs for cabin controls, hates the fingerprints on display screens, not fond of sedans, really hates display screens (including the one on the Bolt).

Efthrreoh posted: "...I see the supercharger network as more hype. It still is no substitute for the refueling convenience that ICE has over any EV regardless of range. It still limits Teslas to predetermined routes..."

Yes, if you don't mind constantly having to pull into a gas station at (usually) inconvenient times to put more fuel in your auto. The amount of time I save every month by having a full "tank" every morning more than offsets the time I might occasionally spend at a Supercharger when I'm on an occasional weekend trip.
 

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A pretty sketchy review - and yet another lame comparison of two dissimilar cars. At least they spent more ink on the Bolt than on the pricey Tesla. Look to the car mags for better/ more in-depth analysis, once the Tesla Model 3 Standard becomes available this summer (hopefully). In particular, it appears they never drove the cars in the rain. The problematic windshield wiper controls on the Tesla Model 3 is of concern to me. Apparently the driver has to fiddle with the giant central display to turn on the wipers, and to switch between intermittent, slow and fast wiper speeds. Easy use of wiper controls is something every driver needs. Perhaps it's possible to program one of the steering wheel controls for this function, but I don't think I have seen much on this subject in any of the Tesla Model 3 reviews.
 

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A pretty sketchy review - and yet another lame comparison of two dissimilar cars. At least they spent more ink on the Bolt than on the pricey Tesla. Look to the car mags for better/ more in-depth analysis, once the Tesla Model 3 Standard becomes available this summer (hopefully). In particular, it appears they never drove the cars in the rain. The problematic windshield wiper controls on the Tesla Model 3 is of concern to me. Apparently the driver has to fiddle with the giant central display to turn on the wipers, and to switch between intermittent, slow and fast wiper speeds. Easy use of wiper controls is something every driver needs. Perhaps it's possible to program one of the steering wheel controls for this function, but I don't think I have seen much on this subject in any of the Tesla Model 3 reviews.
Standard Model 3 was pushed back to later this year. As to the wipers, they did on OTA upgrade to the auto-wiper function back in January I think. You can hit the button on the stalk though if you need to override. Over time this will become more and more refined as will the voice command which is how the majority of menu buried features will be accessed.
 

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Standard Model 3 was pushed back to later this year. As to the wipers, they did on OTA upgrade to the auto-wiper function back in January I think. You can hit the button on the stalk though if you need to override. Over time this will become more and more refined as will the voice command which is how the majority of menu buried features will be accessed.
Standard Model 3 will, I predict, not appear for as long as people are willing to drop $44K min on the long-range version.
 

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A recent model 3 review by Car & Driver. Not complimentary. C&D had to borrow the car as Tesla wouldn't give them one.
https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2018-tesla-model-3-test-review

Road & Track's model 3 review in January. Tesla gave R&T an M3 as well as a ludicrous S. Article is full of B.S. about the M3's skeuomorphisms.
https://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/first-drives/a15070866/tesla-model-3-test-drive-review/

Guess which mag got paid off by Tesla. And which one didn't. Funny, years ago I thought Road & Track was legitimate.
 

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Disagree, the comparison is natural
I agree there. They are aimed at different markets, but there is a lot of overlap in those markets.
as they are the first two BEVs with a >200 mile range priced in the same zip code (maybe area code)
Disagree there..
It's still currently comparing a $35k car (some paid less than that for their Bolts; I did) to a $50k car.
At least for now...

as vehicles of the same size with the same features.
Not sure I agree there either.
They are both small, but I personally see them as different in size and features...
In essence they are the first "usable" EVs that "regular" car buyers can aspire to.
Yep!!!
I doubt that many Bolt buyers wouldn't have cross shopped against a Model 3 if you could just walk into a Tesla store and buy one as easily as you can a Bolt.
Agree!!
I am sure there are car buyers who walked into dealerships looking for a compact and walked out with an SUV.
There is reason to cross shop both..

desiv
 
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