Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
2021 Bolt LT
Joined
·
270 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My mother-in-law has an old RV parking space at her house which has a 30 amp 120v outlet. It's an odd plug (TT-30P). I got an adapter on Amazon and it works to charge the car at 12 amps. But, the outlet is rated at 30 amps (has a 30 amp breaker too), so I should be able to pull 24 amps out of it. But the Bolt won't do it.

Does anyone know of a way to use this outlet more effectively? Is there perhaps a different EVSE that would charge faster?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
Nope, the onboard electronics control it. 8 or 12A on 120V only.
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
199 Posts
It's very likely that it's a dedicated circuit. If so, it is possible to convert a 120v dedicated circuit to a 240v circuit and use a L2 charger. I did this. It is to code.
It’s true, the only requirement is the white wire be marked by wrapping in black or red tape at the panel and receptacle.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt LT Cayenne Orange Metallic
Joined
·
390 Posts
Not being very knowledgeable, I used to think 4 wires were required for 240 volts. That's because I saw 4 wires for our electric range. Turns out that was because the range uses 240 AND 120.

No neutral is needed for 240. Just two 120's and the ground. I discovered this 4 years ago when wiring up my Clipper Creek EVSE. I wasn't too old to learn new tricks after all. I even used the red tape too at each end.😎
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
Just no 120VAC 24A EVSE's out there.
Instead of getting an adapter I might have like suggested convert it to 240VAC if there are 4 wires there. No current code would allow 3 wires to that outdoor plug. Might have to install a GFCI breaker to make local code of you mess with it.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt LT Cayenne Orange Metallic
Joined
·
390 Posts
Just no 120VAC 24A EVSE's out there.
Instead of getting an adapter I might have like suggested convert it to 240VAC if there are 4 wires there. No current code would allow 3 wires to that outdoor plug. Might have to install a GFCI breaker to make local code of you mess with it.
So even though a Level 2 EVSE only has 3 wires, including a ground wire, 4 wires are needed? What does the 4th wire connect to?

And at least the Clipper Creek Level 2 that I bought, has GFCI built in. It's not outdoors though, it's in the garage and hard wired.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
So even though a Level 2 EVSE only has 3 wires, including a ground wire, 4 wires are needed? What does the 4th wire connect to?
A fourth wire is not required. L2 EVSEs typically need only ground and the two hot phases. This is the case for my Grizzl-E, the neutral prong of the 14-50 connector isn't connected to anything inside the box.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt LT
Joined
·
270 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Rewiring was one of my first thoughts. But it's not too practical. It's my mother-in-laws house, she would let me do it. But she would have to empty her closet for me to get the front off the box. For the small number of days we are there each year, it would be a lot to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
Easy to get a permit and have a contractor install something and get the permit cleared.

Might be easier to get some dc charge nearby and just top off your car at 120VAC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,353 Posts
^^^ I'd never get a permit for something like this. Nobody would ever know about it, and it's to code.

I went the opposite direction, converting a 240v 20 amp circuit to 120v 20 amp. Just took a different breaker and outlet. Quick, easy, and cheap. Going 120v to 240v is the same process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
It's very likely that it's a dedicated circuit. If so, it is possible to convert a 120v dedicated circuit to a 240v circuit and use a L2 charger. I did this. It is to code.
Yes, do this. It will still be a 30 amp circuit, but will have two hot 120v lines instead of one hot and one neutral. If your EVSE is hard-wired, all you'll need is a 30 amp breaker. If you have a plug-in EVSE, you'll also need a 30 amp 240 volt receptacle and probably an adapter (most EVSEs have 50 amp plugs). Make sure your EVSE is a 24 amp unit, or one that can be limited to 24 amps.

I have a TT30 receptacle on the side of the house. When we get a second EV, this is exactly what I'm going to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
A guy at work asked me about Bob.
Bob who's Bob? He said, you know Bob in the safety videos that does all the goofy things with the wiring. The guy it seems to mean well but in the end it's a disaster.
 

·
Registered
2020 Bolt EV LT
Joined
·
212 Posts
Is there perhaps a different EVSE that would charge faster?
Clipper Creek offers a 20 amp Level 1 EVSE - the ACS-25, ($469!) You would still need to add a plug and even then, the Bolt may not accept more than 12 amps at Level 1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
The four wires in 220v circuit are
red=hot
black=hot
white=neutral
bare/green=ground
netural and ground are somewhat interchangeable
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
A guy at work asked me about Bob.
Bob who's Bob? He said, you know Bob in the safety videos that does all the goofy things with the wiring. The guy it seems to mean well but in the end it's a disaster.
Not sure who you are referring to… but changing a 30 amp 120v line to a 30 amp 240v breaker is fine. Nothing sketchy about it as long as the receptacle gets changed to a 30 amp 240v unit. The wiring is the same. 30 amps is 30 amps. That’s how electricity works.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt LT Cayenne Orange Metallic
Joined
·
390 Posts
The four wires in 220v circuit are
red=hot
black=hot
white=neutral
bare/green=ground
netural and ground are somewhat interchangeable
That sounds right although the neutral is only needed for something like a range that uses 120 volts for the controls, and 240 for the elements. So a 120/240 circuit. Otherwise no neutral is needed.

From my meager understanding, the two hots, being 180° out of phase with each other, take turns being the neutral. Westinghouse won, and it's AC to our homes, not DC, so we can do this.

I had 20 amp cable running out to my detached garage that was not in use. So, I used it for my CC LCS-20 Level 2 EVSE. The white wire served as the 2nd hot, and I put red electrical tape on both ends to identify it as so. Otherwise it was just standard NM cable as used for a 120 v circuit.

In the house, I connected it to a sub panel that had formerly been used when we had an electric dryer. And that too only used three wires. Don't worry, I swapped out the 30 amp breaker for a 20 amp breaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
The four wires in 220v circuit are
red=hot
black=hot
white=neutral
bare/green=ground
netural and ground are somewhat interchangeable
Um, I guess I can't speak to your jurisdiction, but a) neutral and ground are not interchangeable as far as building code goes. While they both do physically ground to the panel, the reason the ground is uncoated is so that if the wire sheathing is ever pierced by metal, there is a far greater chance of it shorting and tripping the breaker. B) Neutral is not needed for a 220 / 240v circuit. If you are wiring a new outlet, I'd absolutely use 3 conductor wire (ground is not counted as a conductor) in case you want to use it for something else down the road, but in the example given of using an existing wire, it is perfectly okay to just have +120 and -120 hot lines (plus the ground) supplied to the box, and 240v plug. Can't plug a stove into that outlet, as it's 120v circuits won't work, but if you're trying to wire up a stove in your driveway, you may have larger issues. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
That sounds right although the neutral is only needed for something like a range that uses 120 volts for the controls, and 240 for the elements. So a 120/240 circuit. Otherwise no neutral is needed.

From my meager understanding, the two hots, being 180° out of phase with each other, take turns being the neutral. Westinghouse won, and it's AC to our homes, not DC, so we can do this.
Correct, with the slight exception that technically the hots are never "neutral" (meaning it would measure 0v to ground). But fundamentally correct that the circuit is just using the difference betwenn +120 and -120 to get it's 240v potential
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
Plug will require GFCI now.
Hardware uses GFCI in EVSE.
Yes, 3 wire plus ground and bonding will have to be correct.
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top