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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Are the windshield wipers that bad?

Toronto had its first snow storm today and the roads were ****. And here is my first gripe on this car. The wipers suck! Where do I start.

1) The way the wiper go to the outside with the 1" a pilar wall is a problem with ice/snow/slush damming
2) The freezing of ice on the glass under the cabin area where the wipers reside, making large ice ridges that makes the wiper streak.
3) The sheer noise that the wiper make chattering like crazy. especially at their bottom stroke

I have the heat on all the time. Did I miss something, Did I fail to read the manual?
 

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I've been thinking about this since this thread was started, the OP was heavily dismissed in that thread, I think perhaps prematurely. I haven't had an opportunity to deal with a winter storm yet, but I get the feeling owners will be fixing/band-aiding GM's mistake here. I've been pondering potential solutions, but nothing concrete yet. Let us know if you are able to brain storm anything to offset this design snafu.

edit: I was just thinking maybe try to wax at least the lower edge and the side pillar area as @ProfessorBolta mentioned in that thread referencing ChrisFix on YT, and perhaps a set of these heated wipers (or similar) would be a cool bling item! You could wax the whole thing, I'm not sure if there are any visibility side effects to waxing glass... Worth a try!
 

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We drove in moderate snow a couple days ago and had no trouble with the wipers...it was 'granular' snow and not at all sticky, though.
 

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My experience with a 60's car that had similar windshield wiper orientation was to not start driving until the windshield defroster had the windshield warm enough to melt the snow as soon as it hit the windshield. Then the "snow dam" on the outside windshield pillars would just slide off from the wind. However if the snow was really coming down hard there still was some side accumulation which caused issues.

Unfortunately, unlike an ICE, that heat is not free in a Bolt and it means chewing up several miles worth of battery while I am going nowhere. Lucky for me, unlike our peers up north, I don't expect to deal with this. As a rule I never drive in the snow here in Portland, mainly because the drivers here make Atlanta snow drivers look like Iditarod Professionals. Traffic comes to a complete standstill as soon as there is any accumulation. Way too many folks drive their non-snow tire equipped cars (usually with bald tires) until they get stuck, then just get out of their cars and leave them in the middle of the street and/or highway. That way streets can't be plowed until cars are towed. We had three such two day vacations last year. Yes not enough people learned from the first or second rounds to not drive in the snow, although the 3rd was only a one day shutdown, so there was some improvement.

If there is snow in the forecast I either don't drive to work or go home as soon as I see snow coming on the radar and make sure I have enough food for a couple of days at home.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here are the videos! :)

In this one you can see the problem already and you can see my wonderfull mileage :) You can see its -3C outside Who say a bolt cant get low!

https://youtu.be/fNfRKDpsClk

Ok later in the early evening you can hear the wonderful noise they make and the streaking is worse, definitely a SAFETY ISSUE

https://youtu.be/oje3N-DB5t0

And lastly a view from the outside, if you watch the jittery camera phone carefully you can see the vertical ice ridges under the wiper rest area! Chevy needs a heating strip here. You can all see the damming at the a pillars. Not good either.

https://youtu.be/n0VhGCufPqM
 

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38% climate control energy use, and it's not even that cold! Funny in a sad way... The lack of a heater strip or maybe that "invisible" heated windshield grid in nicer cars would have been a welcome addition for sure!

edit: I knew places like JC Whitney used to sell DIY rear defroster grid kits for cars that didn't come with them; it turns out there are companies that sell wiper parking area defrost grids as well. Interesting, and this seems of particular concern for heavy/slushy snow driving in electric cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
to be honest that was about 45 minutes of driving in silly traffic. but heater was on all the time. including in the first video when we were waiting 15 minutes for my sons bus. but interestingly was using 1kw only at 21C it was nice in the cabin. At that point i took it off auto and place it on defrost on medium fan to try to fix the windhield to no avail it just ended up getting work during the next hours driving of about 15-17 kms in traffic. Heat / defrast on all the time but still the problem. Video 2/3 was at home in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My experience with a 60's car that had similar windshield wiper orientation was to not start driving until the windshield defroster had the windshield warm enough to melt the snow as soon as it hit the windshield. Then the "snow dam" on the outside windshield pillars would just slide off from the wind. However if the snow was really coming down hard there still was some side accumulation which caused issues.

Unfortunately, unlike an ICE, that heat is not free in a Bolt and it means chewing up several miles worth of battery while I am going nowhere. Lucky for me, unlike our peers up north, I don't expect to deal with this. As a rule I never drive in the snow here in Portland, mainly because the drivers here make Atlanta snow drivers look like Iditarod Professionals. Traffic comes to a complete standstill as soon as there is any accumulation. Way too many folks drive their non-snow tire equipped cars (usually with bald tires) until they get stuck, then just get out of their cars and leave them in the middle of the street and/or highway. That way streets can't be plowed until cars are towed. We had three such two day vacations last year. Yes not enough people learned from the first or second rounds to not drive in the snow, although the 3rd was only a one day shutdown, so there was some improvement.

If there is snow in the forecast I either don't drive to work or go home as soon as I see snow coming on the radar and make sure I have enough food for a couple of days at home.
driving for almost 40 years up here I dont disagree, I had defrost on and even preconditioned cabin before I started my journey. When the snow comes down hard and you are not going very fast this usually becomes an issue but never with the 20 or so vehicles I have owned have I ever seen it to such a degree, in this case its a SAFETY ISSUE if the system cannot cope (running with heather systems on) with weather. at time it was difficult to see.

The defrost on was melting the snow and would wipe the water both to the side and bottom. At the bottom, where there is 6 inches of glass not exposed to the cabin heat from the defrost is where the water would freeze. I even tried using winshield washer fluid to mitigate icing to no avail. I might mix up 50/50 methanol and water and try it, or perhaps straigh methanol ;) methanol mixed with water creates an exothermic reaction too.
 

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How about a little cowling to place over the defrost outlets to point the airflow lower on the window.

OR, speaking of heavier methanol mixes, one of those little battery powered grille igniters mounted out by the wipers, with the pushbutton mounted inside - once you get enough methanol in the washer fluid, you should be ICE FREE FOR SURE upon activation! :D
 

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Give Rain-X a try. I've found it to work well with snow and in icy conditions.

Rain-X
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How about a little cowling to place over the defrost outlets to point the airflow lower on the window.

OR, speaking of heavier methanol mixes, one of those little battery powered grille igniters mounted out by the wipers, with the pushbutton mounted inside - once you get enough methanol in the washer fluid, you should be ICE FREE FOR SURE upon activation! :D
I like it ! >:)
 

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I am the OP in that other thread that got poo poo'd.
Thank you for being another person that hates this. It is a safety issue for sure.

I know it was suggested to WAX the windsheid but unless someone else in this kind of climate can tell me how it works, no thanks. I am thinking of streaking worse and not even sure what kind of wax.
I will also be washing my car every other day so not sure how well that will stay on.

With there being a ridge at the side and bottom of windshield there is no where for the snow to go. Can't fly off is what I am getting at.

Make sure to let us know what you do as I have not done anything yet. I have yet to drive in snow snow.
 

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I have similar issues in my '15 Jetta, with wet snow getting compacted at the side of the window between the wiper and the A-pillar. Also getting jammed up beneath the cowl where the wipers tuck out of sight like the Bolt. I just had to make sure both areas were clear before I set off and then it was not so bad, unless moving very slowly in heavy wet snowfall where it would accumulate again. We'll see this winter how the Bolt does when we eventually get some snow in BC but I'm expecting the same problems.
 

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Rain-X reduces ice/snow build up. I think the newer formulations doesn't result in much windshield streakiness or haze.
 

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I've had cars with the same raised A-pillars as the Bolt, and snow did build up there... and it turns into hard pack ice after a while.
Of course on an ICE vehicle, blasting the defroster on 85+deg for 45min cleared it out.

I would hate to see the power drain that would result if you tried that in the Bolt.

Overall, seems like a poor, short sighted windshield design.
 

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I have similar issues in my '15 Jetta, with wet snow getting compacted at the side of the window between the wiper and the A-pillar. Also getting jammed up beneath the cowl where the wipers tuck out of sight like the Bolt. I just had to make sure both areas were clear before I set off and then it was not so bad, unless moving very slowly in heavy wet snowfall where it would accumulate again. We'll see this winter how the Bolt does when we eventually get some snow in BC but I'm expecting the same problems.
Yeah, here in Vancouver snow almost always falls at temperatures very near freezing, which means it can melt and refreeze in inconvenient places. It's why the smart drivers all carry ice scrapers...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah, here in Vancouver snow almost always falls at temperatures very near freezing, which means it can melt and refreeze in inconvenient places. It's why the smart drivers all carry ice scrapers...
Sean, are you freaking kidding? Your defending an issue that should have been engineered properly? And blaming the driver? Yeah let me just stop and deal with it off to the side of the highway during a snow storm :( I should not have to stop at all and scrape my car off again and again to clean frozen ice and ice damming off the windshield while i am driving it. A simple resistive heater near those places in the windshield would have solved the issue, nothing new and nothing other vehicle manufacturers have not done.
 

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I experienced the same problem as the OP last night in Southern Ontario. The weather was cold with light snow. I began my journey with a clean windshield and a warm preconditioned cabin straight from the garage. Within a few minutes of driving the melting snow was freezing at the base of the windshield where the defrost blast can't reach. The ice clung to the wipers causing lots of streaking, which made it difficult to see where I was going. Running the defrost at maximum power had no effect because the ice was continuously forming at the base of the windshield.

This is a serious design flaw. It's not practical to stop the car every 5 minutes to scrape the base of the windshield. It's also not even possible to do this on the highway. This is a safety hazard that should be addressed in a recall before somebody gets hurt or killed. What good is a car in northern climates if it can't be driven in the snow? For my second trip of the night I chose to leave my Bolt in the garage and instead had to drive my gas guzzling SUV.
 
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