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Discussion Starter #1
I know there won't be oil to check but are there any other fluids I may need to look at in the Bolt?
 

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The service advisor at my dealership said, at my age, I shouldn't bother opening the hood. Waste of time. The display will tell me everything I need to know.
 

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There is cabin coolant fluid, but the manual says don't even worry about it unless you have issues with heating. The other fluid is brake fluid which needs to be replaced every 5 years. They want you to check levels and for leaks every 7500 miles. That is really about it.
 

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The service advisor at my dealership said, at my age, I shouldn't bother opening the hood. Waste of time. The display will tell me everything I need to know.
But you have to open the hood to show all the curious inquirers the "insides". You should know the washer fluid container from the coolant reservoirS, even if you only put fluid in one of them. (And don't (as I did once) point out the rectifier and call it "the electric motor"!)
 

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Doesn't the battery have fluid for temperature control?

I probably only change brake fluid and other fluids every 10 years. I'm not racing my vehicles, so no danger of boiling the water that accumulates.
The battery temperature regulation system does use a fluid coolant. However it is a sealed system and is on the maintenance schedule to be changed at 150,000 miles. So really the only thing to look for out with that system is leaks.
 

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The battery temperature regulation system does use a fluid coolant. However it is a sealed system and is on the maintenance schedule to be changed at 150,000 miles. So really the only thing to look for out with that system is leaks.
There are 3 separate coolant loops, all with reservoirs that are easily visible under the hood and coolant is easy to add if needed. They are not sealed systems.

You can see two at the front and the third in the back left near the firewall. They have an orange/red fluid in them. The washer fluid reservoir is on the left and the fluid (from the factory) is blue.

Heating cooling (qt / L): Heating loop 1.8L
Battery pack cooling (qt / L): 6.9L (RESS cooling loop total coolant volume)
Power electronics cooling (qt / L): 3.9L (PE & DU cooling loop total coolant volume)
 

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There are 3 separate coolant loops, all with reservoirs that are easily visible under the hood and coolant is easy to add if needed. They are not sealed systems.

You can see two at the front and the third in the back left near the firewall. They have an orange/red fluid in them. The washer fluid reservoir is on the left and the fluid (from the factory) is blue.

Heating cooling (qt / L): Heating loop 1.8L
Battery pack cooling (qt / L): 6.9L (RESS cooling loop total coolant volume)
Power electronics cooling (qt / L): 3.9L (PE & DU cooling loop total coolant volume)
Well I wasn't trying to imply you couldn't see or get to the fluid. By sealed I meant to imply no need to add or remove fluids until the normal maintenance cycle, assuming a leak never develops. The coolant level should never change in those systems short of an issue/leak. So sealed wasn't the best word to use without adding an explanation.
 

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Also you mentioning firewall just made me wonder if it really is a firewall there. I mean there really isn't that much in the front of the car to generate heat, at least in comparison to an ICE car. So the firewall wouldn't need to protect from that heat. A fire could start in the engine area, but there really isn't much to burn there. No oils, fuel or other flammable fluids. I have to assume all the insulation around the wires is of the fire retardant type.

So I wonder if they skimped on the firewall to save weight or if they are even legally allowed to? I don't know if there are any regulations requiring a firewall for safety concerns.
 

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Also you mentioning firewall just made me wonder if it really is a firewall there. I mean there really isn't that much in the front of the car to generate heat, at least in comparison to an ICE car. So the firewall wouldn't need to protect from that heat. A fire could start in the engine area, but there really isn't much to burn there. No oils, fuel or other flammable fluids. I have to assume all the insulation around the wires is of the fire retardant type.

So I wonder if they skimped on the firewall to save weight or if they are even legally allowed to? I don't know if there are any regulations requiring a firewall for safety concerns.
"Firewall" is likely more of a part name like fender, hood, quarterpanel, etc.
I suspect its biggest role is in crash test safety as a structural component (both ICE and EV).
 

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Also you mentioning firewall just made me wonder if it really is a firewall there.
As Duc says, firewall is just what you call the thing separating the passenger compartment from the engine compartment. It's thin gauge sheet metal in normal cars, so not much you can do to skimp there.
 

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As Duc says, firewall is just what you call the thing separating the passenger compartment from the engine compartment. It's thin gauge sheet metal in normal cars, so not much you can do to skimp there.
Ah, I always assumed from the name there was actual insulation or fire retardant material there to keep a fire in the engine compartment from getting to the passenger compartment to quickly.
 

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Ah, I always assumed from the name there was actual insulation or fire retardant material there to keep a fire in the engine compartment from getting to the passenger compartment to quickly.
There's usually insulation there but it's more for sound deadening and a bit of thermal separation between the cabin and the engine bay. IME with ICE cars that insulation is going to do very little as a fire barrier.
 

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Be aware that those coolant reservoirs use only a 50/50 premix that's made from distilled water to prevent isolation failure. Minerals can cause conductivity within the systems with tap water :nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
meanwhile

Don't forget about your blinker fluid ;). My wife is always complaining that I use mine too sparingly.
Meanwhile my uncle will complain that if you use the blinker too much you'll wear it out.

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Hmm, I had a fluid question. The traction motor has transmission fluid in it. Anyone know the lifespan of that? I imagine it's "life of the vehicle" if it's not on the schedule, and I realize there's probably not a lot going on that would wear it out. Just curious.
 
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