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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
One Big Smoldering Question:

What is happening to the 99.9% of these battery packs which are truly fine.

1. Are the batteries being ground up and poured into waste sites? Recycled?
2. Are the battery packs being repurposed into something else?
3. Are the batteries being resold?

As much as I want a new battery pack and the longer range, the impact of throwing away this much functional power storage and delivery is concerning, no matter the benefit to me as an owner.
If any can be determined "safe" (including with restrictions that still allow for reasonable use), then they could at least theoretically be used for other purposes like grid storage. Any that cannot be determined "safe" (including with restrictions that still allow for reasonable reuse) will likely be recycled to mine the materials from them.

The real problem is that LG and GM have not yet found a non-destructive way of determining which packs or modules are "safe" (or "safe" within the usage parameters of a car). If they did have such a method, they could avoid replacing the ones found to be "safe".
 

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Another thread here stated the procedure calls for 'Charging to full. Driving to 50% for testing. Charging to full again.' And that's IF it arrives at less than 50% SOC.
No. None of that is required. If you show up with the battery below 90% SoC, and last charge at least 24 hours previous, the battery can be pulled immediately. GM claims they can tell both of these requirements with their laptop plugged into the OBD II port. The new battery, once in the car, needs to be put on a charger to assure the charging system/BMS is functioning correctly. The procedure says charge to 100% for the customer, if possible, before they arrive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
No. None of that is required. If you show up with the battery below 90% SoC, and last charge at least 24 hours previous, the battery can be pulled immediately. GM claims they can tell both of these requirements with their laptop plugged into the OBD II port.
The revised service bulletin just say to ask the customer when the last charge was, since apparently the check through OBD-II / GDS2 sometimes gave false time since last charge.
 

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The revised service bulletin just say to ask the customer when the last charge was, since apparently the check through OBD-II / GDS2 sometimes gave false time since last charge.
Yeah, why am I not surprised? When GM showed charging history on the website, it was invariably all wrong. They solved that by dropping the information from the site. GM is promising to become a digital powerhouse. :ROFLMAO:
 

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The base hours for the recall are 4.5, and yes, that includes repackaging the old battery into the crate. As major component swaps go, this one isn't super complicated.

Whatever the time it is taking them to replace batteries ,I'll say it again that this recall has a few silver linings for GM and one of those is that it created a massive training education scenerio for it's techs as well as the entire service depts of GM dealers.

Weknow then next time your Bolt needs to be worked on the chances are our local dealer will have at least 1 person that knows how to work on them...

So it's a eduction/training investment GM is getting out of the way..and will make them a leader in that area
 

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Hi @boltage - sorry, late to the party. Here's the info for my car:

Status: "Not yet"

Model year: 2019
Build date 06/2019
Battery origin: KR (battery P/N 688380169)
High Risk Use: seldom (went down to 60 miles range maybe twice since guidance given, never over 90%)
Last checked status: 11 November (still "REMEDY NOT YET AVAILABLE"
 
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One Big Smoldering Question:

What is happening to the 99.9% of these battery packs which are truly fine.

1. Are the batteries being ground up and poured into waste sites? Recycled?
2. Are the battery packs being repurposed into something else?
3. Are the batteries being resold?

As much as I want a new battery pack and the longer range, the impact of throwing away this much functional power storage and delivery is concerning, no matter the benefit to me as an owner.
Not sure if I should post this, because it will probable lead to another round of "new" vs "refurbished" arguments, but as of May, GM claimed to have recycled all batteries they have taken back from customers.
 

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The Chevy tech that's responding on FB groups says that's unnecessary. IIRC, he says it only applies if installing a battery of unknown capacity. It looks like it's going to be tough to find it given how crappy FB's search is.

Update: Found it at
Code:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/chevyboltevowners/posts/2988233918154881?comment_id=2988504171461189&reply_comment_id=2988551264789813
. It's from Jaryd. He said:
No it is not part of the procedure specifically for the recall. The capacity relearn USED to set the initial capacity learn setpoint at 134.25Ah, 138.75Ah, or 143.25 Ah depending on the battery chemistry and then the charge/drive charge procedure would learn the correct initial capacity. It would then fine tune the capacity over the next few dozen charge/discharge cycles. Any repairs that required a capacity learn we would either need to do this ourselves or provide these directions to the customer. This is needed when servicing various age batteries that the capacity is unknown. Since this recall is using all new batteries with the same capacity GM changed the initial capacity learn to 194.31Ah so the initial value doesn't need to be learned with the charge/drive/charge cycle. All we have to do is perform the reset and then deliver the car as thr fine tuning is all that needs to happen. I actually am glad to see a tech providing these instructions because it shows he is normally doing things properly, he probably just missed that the capacity learn is slightly different for this recall specifically.
 

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Another thread here stated the procedure calls for 'Charging to full. Driving to 50% for testing. Charging to full again.' And that's IF it arrives at less than 50% SOC.

Somehow, If it is done quicker than the 'Book Hours' for this procedure, shortcuts are being taken.
Somewhere here. I can't find it now.
Maybe that is wrong info.

What are the procedures and hours allotted to the battery swap?
I remember the post also talked about the hours it takes to get the old pack in the shipping box.
It's at Canadians: any progress with the recall? and apparently not needed. My reply is at Battery replacement recall remedy tracking summary (above), quoting the Chevy tech that's been posting and relying on Bolt FB groups.
 

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(Charging to 100% and discharging to 50% after installing the new battery pack.)

Thanks buddy, so I'm not making things up! ;)

Only who is the authority saying this official procedure is 'not needed'?
That's an easy answer... Corporate gm, and the procedure is outlined in the NHTSA documents. That's the remedy to the recall, and the process that should be followed based on that being the submitted resolution to the issue.
 

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(Charging to 100% and discharging to 50% after installing the new battery pack.)

Thanks buddy, so I'm not making things up! ;)

Only who is the authority saying this official procedure is 'not needed'?
The image in that Canada thread is an extract of an internal gm document ID shown at the top the instructions of which are mentioned in the learn area of the NHTSA documents. It's kinda outta context. They're bullet points that appear under a step.
I talk about it here. There is no requirement to charge up or do anything after the swap. Do the learn, hand over the fob. All of which can be done in the allotted time of 4-5 hours if not actually less for the customer. However long it takes to re-package the old battery is not required to keep the car for.
 

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... It's kinda outta context. They're bullet points that appear under a step.
...There is no requirement to charge up or do anything after the swap.
Do the learn, hand over the fob. All of which can be done in the allotted time of 4-5 hours if not actually less for the customer....
But they are bullet points.
Where is it written to ignore them?

Don't get me wrong. I'd love to get my car back in '4-5 hrs', but if the dealership is getting paid to do these steps...
Plus, I'd rather they didn't rack up ~100 miles of driving my car to relearn the GOM.
I can do that. Just make it official.
Hopefully we can find the wording in the procedure that says to do it the way you describe.

Oh well, I'm way down the waiting list. No hurry sorting this issue out,, for me. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Summary so far:
  • Still looks like mostly 2019 cars getting moved to remedy-eligible.
  • Looks like initial group moved to remedy-eligible October 8-22, 2021. Then a smaller group moved to remedy-eligible November 5-6, 2021.
  • Speed of getting work done is quite variable, depending on dealer willingness and knowledge of the remedy procedure.
  • Other year cars appear to be still those stuck at dealers waiting for module replacements due to "bad battery" codes and such (e.g. P0BBD).
  • However, Facebook A.H. recently had a replacement in a 2018 car with 185k miles and mostly charging to 100% and frequent deep discharges. No mention of being stuck at the dealer waiting for a module replacement. (I am not adding most Facebook reports now, but I added this one because it is interesting.)
 
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