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We just took possession of our second Bolt. Electric Blue, and it's a beaut. When were taking possession at the dealer, I checked the projected mileage - it read 209, substantially below the expected 234 or so. :eek: The dealer assured me that it was fully charged, and I mentioned my concern that it should have been higher. I didn't feel like I had enough evidence to back out of the deal without looking like a complete jerk. So we took it home, and over the next few days drove it around the neighborhood for errands, etc. Each time we returned home, I would put it on the charger to see what I could get for a "full charge" reading. It did rise to 214, which was encouraging. Finally, we took it to the mountains in the area for a good battery work-out. Upon returning, another full charge, and a reading of 247 ! It looks like it had conditioned itself through a deep discharge / recharge.

This sequence of events was completely different from our first Bolt, which was acquired during winter months, and indicated 234 miles off the bat. I'm not sure why the low readings initially occurred this time, and am wondering if any of you had such an experience? My concern was that the new Bolt was sitting on their lot for a few months in 90 and sometimes 100 degree temps without being plugged in, and subsequently damaging the battery. Doesn't look like that occurred, thankfully. Must be a pretty tough battery...
 

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the estimated range is based on recent driving history - it's easily lead astray by statically insignificant variations in driving efficiency - the _ONLY_ way it's remotely accurate if after driving in a calm and consistent manner on a flat surface...

I personally never pay attention to it - because it's at best a SWAG (Scientific Wild Ass Guess) at your range. A much more accurate reading of the battery is the actual percentage of charge.

the range number is called the guess-o-meter and that's the best name I'ver ever seen for it.

the range was probably low when you picked it up due to test drives which I'm sure were heavy on the acceleration and limited regeneration because non-EV drivers don't know how to avoid using the brakes.
 

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"My concern was that the new Bolt was sitting on their lot for a few months in 90 and sometimes 100 degree temps without being plugged in, and subsequently damaging the battery."

That history is still of concern. I agree one hundred percent with daveo4bolt. You were probably set up with the initial guess-o-meter reading by those short test drives and the salesman encouraging show off speeds. But the history that you gave, if it was true that months went by without a balancing charge, indicates that you should still watch for expected potential. You need to see that you finally use and see put back in, over 56KWH. That, and when hill top is turned off, all bars on the left are lit up and claimed by the guess-o-meter. See that, and an indication of 100% SOC every month or so, and I will feel better. The I-Miev is much more simple, with less protection, and the old fashioned PO4 batteries. But, I do know that sales people, leaving the car in hot lots for months, and rarely, if ever, charging, were the cause of a major battery failure. Luckily, even as a used car, the drive battery warranty got me a new one at the time that I picked it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's interesting that you mentioned the Miev, which was our first car. After a year of use, the battery degraded down to about 50% capacity. It was a real knock-down, drag-out fight with them to replace it, which they ultimately did. When I saw the initial "guess-o-meter" reading of 209 miles on this Bolt, I almost had a PTSD moment. We'll see how this battery works out. And I do know how to battle with the dealer/manufacturer if necessary. BTW, the new Bolt had only 11 miles on it when we took possession.
 

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You have a lot to learn about the Bolt. You can't base battery condition, life or anything else
for that matter, on the range estimation gauge. It only gives you an estimated range based on the last use from the last charge. It has nothing to do with battery health or condition, as stated above.

You surely would have looked like a jerk had you backed out of the car for this reason.
Read as much as you can and ask lots of questions before making unfounded and incorrect assumptions.
 
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You surely would have looked like a jerk had you backed out of the car for this reason.
Or is it making statements like this that makes somebody sound like a jerk? ;)

I think the range predictions are not so bad. Give me two fully charged Bolts and allow me to drive both of them back and forth to work twice and I will tell you which has the better battery. IMHO, the only thing TS did 'wrong' was not take into account the possible impact of possible test drives.
 

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the estimated range is based on recent driving history - it's easily lead astray by statically insignificant variations in driving efficiency - the _ONLY_ way it's remotely accurate if after driving in a calm and consistent manner on a flat surface...

the range number is called the guess-o-meter and that's the best name I've ever seen for it.
You are absolutely correct. The manufacturers of EVs should include an option enabling the driver to change the range display so that it shows kiloWatt-hours remaining rather than miles remaining.

If I had a "fuel gauge" in my Bolt showing 30 kW-hrs remaining then I would think of it as having half a tank left -- much like I know I have 15 gallons of diesel fuel remaining when my truck fuel gauge shows half a tank...
 

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If I had a "fuel gauge" in my Bolt showing 30 kW-hrs remaining then I would think of it as having half a tank left -- much like I know I have 15 gallons of diesel fuel remaining when my truck fuel gauge shows half a tank...
And in what way does knowing that you have 15 gallons left help you? The number is quite meaningless unless you know what milage you will get in the near future. And this milage depends on the exact same factors as the range gauge does. And by all means, don't we have a gauge that tells you how full your battery is (percentage wise)?

BTW: Former Roswell, GA inhabitant here ;)
 

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there is a "fuel gauge" in that each of the green bar's on the left of the screen represent 5% of battery charge rather than range - it represents actually battery charger - I find it helpful for knowing where I'm at in consumption - it's the closest to a fuel gauge I'm afraid we are going to get - I doubt we'll ever see a "kWh" gauge as this changes over time and with temperature and would cause too much customer feedback for people nagging over the loss of 1 kWh…
 

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And in what way does knowing that you have 15 gallons left help you? The number is quite meaningless unless you know what milage you will get in the near future.
That's the whole point. I know that if I'm cruising empty at a steady 55 mph on flat terrain, then 15 gallons will carry me about 300 miles. On the other hand, if I'm towing my tractor in hilly terrain at 65 mph, them my remaining miles will be roughly half that amount.

The 15 gallon metric is quite accurate -- while the number of miles remaining in the battery of my Bolt is contingent on a wide range of factors that the range-o-meter cannot possibly know. A gauge showing me the kW-hrs remaining in my battery would enable me to do the mental math and therefore be quite useful. But the range-o-meter is doing the math for me -- based on recent driving history rather than on upcoming driving needs. My diesel fuel gauge is therefore far more useful to me than the range-o-meter. And when auto manufacturers begin making pickup truck EVs (which may be used for heavy hauling and towing), the flaws in this ridiculous range-o-meter will become even more obvious...


BTW: Former Roswell, GA inhabitant here ;)
How do you like living in Holland? A bit cooler in the summer than Georgia?
 

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I actually drive a car that already does better in both places than Chevy - I have an estimate of how much battery I'm going to use while driving…based on distance, speed and terrain…software can do amazing things - we should all expect more from Chevy not a rehash of 80 year old technology…see the screen shot below that clearly shows me I'll have 30% battery left at the end of my 150+++ mile drive…
 

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Or is it making statements like this that makes somebody sound like a jerk? ;)

I think the range predictions are not so bad. Give me two fully charged Bolts and allow me to drive both of them back and forth to work twice and I will tell you which has the better battery. IMHO, the only thing TS did 'wrong' was not take into account the possible impact of possible test drives.
Well............ If you had taken the time to actually read what I did, before, I posted.
You might have seen this and you could have avoided being a fool with your little
unsolicited statement about my reply. Please stop trying to be the political police without
knowing the facts. Thanks for your cooperation!


We just took possession of our second Bolt. Electric Blue, and it's a beaut. When were taking possession at the dealer, I checked the projected mileage - it read 209, substantially below the expected 234 or so. :eek: The dealer assured me that it was fully charged, and I mentioned my concern that it should have been higher. I didn't feel like I had enough evidence to back out of the deal without looking like a complete jerk. So we took it home, and over the next few days drove it around the neighborhood for errands, etc. Each time we returned home, I would put it on the charger to see what I could get for a "full charge" reading. It did rise to 214, which was encouraging. Finally, we took it to the mountains in the area for a good battery work-out. Upon returning, another full charge, and a reading of 247 ! It looks like it had conditioned itself through a deep discharge / recharge.

This sequence of events was completely different from our first Bolt, which was acquired during winter months, and indicated 234 miles off the bat. I'm not sure why the low readings initially occurred this time, and am wondering if any of you had such an experience? My concern was that the new Bolt was sitting on their lot for a few months in 90 and sometimes 100 degree temps without being plugged in, and subsequently damaging the battery. Doesn't look like that occurred, thankfully. Must be a pretty tough battery...
 

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james1 said:
If I had a "fuel gauge" in my Bolt showing 30 kW-hrs remaining then I would think of it as having half a tank left -- much like I know I have 15 gallons of diesel fuel remaining when my truck fuel gauge shows half a tank...
You do have a "fuel gauge"; the green bar graph on the left side of the display.
Am I missing something?
It's got better resolution than the LCD "gauge" in a Nissan that I rented last month.
 

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..., the flaws in this ridiculous range-o-meter will become even more obvious...
My driving style must be very consistent / boring, as the GOM serves me very well. More so with my other car, which is an Outlander PHEV. People where bitching about the Outlander GOM as well. But to me, it allowed me to adjust my driving style halfway my daily commute (40 km one-way) in such way that I would reach my destination on the very last electrons. Day in, day out.

It seems I am the only one haopy about the GOM, both in the Bolt and in the Outlander. Then again, as others also said, in the Bolt we have both: indication of percentage full (more granular then in many other cars) + indication of estimated range. How can that be bad?

How do you like living in Holland? A bit cooler in the summer than Georgia?
As before ;). As a matter of fact, I am 100% Dutch. Lived in the Netherlands all my life, except for 11 months back in 1991 / 1992, which I spent in Roswell to write my thesis, sponsored by a Roswell based company (Computone Products).
 

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Please stop trying to be the political police without knowing the facts. Thanks for your cooperation!
Honestly, I find this somewhat funny. You just assumed I didn't read the opening post in full, but I did. And I did see he was more or less asking for it. So, it was you who didn't have the facts straight. I wonder, have you now made a fool out of yourself? :nerd:.

Either way, I still don't agree with you. I don't think he would have made a jerk out of himself if he had backed out of his deal and even if he would have, I don't think there was a need to confirm this.

Read as much as you can and ask lots of questions before making unfounded and incorrect assumptions.
Now, who is being the policeman here? Well, at least my response to you was meant in a humorous way. Cheers.
 
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