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Ah yes, I've read about those batteries and they claim it'll increase electric car range and charging capacity. NHot sure if that was referring to their solid-state battery of that new graphene ball of theirs. Could prove to be interesting if they can scale up and secure a contract with a car manufacturer.
 

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Looks like three different battery innovations with the graphene ball being one of them:

In introducing its low height battery cells, Samsung explained that this new product basically pertains to a battery cell whose height has been reduced by more than 20 percent. The Galaxy S9 maker claims that because this type of battery is shorter than the ones already available in the market, automakers can use it for cars that they intend to equip with bigger interior space.*
Samsung SDI has said that it will also introduce its new battery technology called “graphene ball” at the Detroit Motor Show this week. According to the company, this innovative technology allows a 45 percent capacity increase and five times charging speeds than standard lithium-ion batteries and solid-state batteries. Samsung also confirmed that it is exhibiting a new technology that improves the capacity and safety of solid-state batteries at the event.*
 

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Looks like three different battery innovations with the graphene ball being one of them...
I hope the fact that they're actually showing this at an industry conference means that these ideas are ready to move out of the lab. It's great seeing these advances - it's exactly what's needed to move the price/performance curve into the range of more car buyers.
 

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Do we have any battery experts that can comment on a company's ability (down the road) to take a newer battery technology to the next level and create aftermarket replacements for just about any car without a need to change charging tech that goes into it? In other words, will a day come that perhaps an aftermarket solid state battery could be manufactured to go into a Bolt's footprint and still utilize the existing charge / discharge circuitry?
 

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Do we have any battery experts that can comment on a company's ability (down the road) to take a newer battery technology to the next level and create aftermarket replacements for just about any car without a need to change charging tech that goes into it? In other words, will a day come that perhaps an aftermarket solid state battery could be manufactured to go into a Bolt's footprint and still utilize the existing charge / discharge circuitry?
Certainly it could be done. Does it make economic sense? Probably not. Just as ICE cars are now converted to EVs for more than the cost of a slightly used OEM EV, someone might do it for nostalgic reasons to preserve an early EV example.

What percentage of Tesla roadster owners took up Elon's offer?

https://electrek.co/2016/07/08/tesla-roadster-3-0-battery-upgrade-r80/
 

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Yeah. I suppose such a breakthrough would only be cost effective if engineering of new vehicles simplified battery swaps. But we have seen how the phone industry has intentionally avoided that very thing just to force full device purchases. SAD.
 

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Reading a May 21-June 3, 18 AviationLeak about Uber and their vision for electric aerial urban transportation.

The article mentioned a partnership with ChargePoint to prototype a DC liquid cooled system delivering 2 megawatts!

Four 500 amp circuits where the vehicles have separate battery packs. This allows the vehicle to be charged in 5 minutes between flights.

Probably be a couple decades before this tech trickles down to affordable automobiles, but is fun to see where this might go.
 

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Well, fuel costs are their biggest expense so they have a vested interest in battery advancement.


The only good thing about liquid fuel is the fact that it's weight gets subtracted from the gross weight of the aircraft as it consumes the fuel and you can adjust fuel fill based on load and distance required. A battery powered aircraft would weigh the same no matter if it's at the beginning or end of the flight.


On hot/humid days in NYC, we used to only fill the fuel tanks to 50% in order to be able to load the full compliment of passengers for helicopter sightseeing trips (15min or shorter hops) around Manhattan.. couldn't do that with battery power- so less passengers per trip on hot/humid days.
 

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"...secured nearly $22 million that will take the battery pack to a commercial plant next year with delivery of batteries available in 2020."



That promise, and $5, will get you a cup of coffee at Starbuck's.
Yes, it seems like a new and better battery design is announced weekly. Still, with the hundreds of billions at stake in the battery market, it’s logical to assume that some of these new battery designs will actually come to market.

I don’t doubt that the EV batteries we’ll see in the coming decade will be far superior to the battery currently in the Bolt, with much greater energy densities and much faster charge times, with a lower cost. Estimates as to when the typical EV will be at price parity with a comparable ICE vehicle are all over the map, but many point to the middle of the next decade, around 2025.

We’ll see.
 
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Here's an article with quite a bit of provocative teasing in it:

Toyota and Panasonic to create an electric car-battery spinoff company

According to Nikkei Asian Review, Toyota Motors and Panasonic have agreed to set up a joint-venture company to manufacture vehicle batteries, with Toyota owning 51 percent of the company and Panasonic owning 49 percent.

Ars Technica contacted both companies to confirm the report, and we'll update this story if we hear back.
Nikkei reports that Panasonic would transfer ownership of five battery factories in Japan and China to the joint venture. The joint venture would start operations "in the early 2020s," and it would start producing "batteries with 50 times the capacity of those now used in hybrid vehicles, aiming to bring down production costs through higher volume," according to Nikkei.

The news outlet also said that the joint venture would be used to push forward the technology used in solid-state batteries. Solid-state batteries don't exist in commercial production yet, but they are theoretically lighter, safer, and have a more competitive energy density than existing lithium-ion batteries. Toyota has been working on such solid-state battery research for years. In 2017, The Wall Street Journal reported that Toyota was working on "production engineering" for a solid-state electric vehicle battery, which it hoped to commercialize by 2022.

Panasonic has extensive experience mass-manufacturing new battery technology, including through a partnership on the massive Tesla Gigafactory in Nevada. So from Toyota's point of view, a partnership with Panasonic might be one way for the car maker to jump-start solid-state battery manufacturing. Toyota made significant strides in the hybrid-vehicle market, but when in the field of battery electric vehicles (BEVs), the company has lagged behind other companies.

Toyota leadership has historically favored hydrogen fuel cell vehicles as the future. Just last week, the head of Toyota's Fuel Cell system development, Katsuhiko Hirose, told The Drive that he expects fuel cell vehicles to eventually be cheaper than gasoline-powered cars and to be more universally practical than battery-powered vehicles.
As a person who totally believed that IBM's Watson would never dominate "Jeopardy" and that reusable boosters such as those of SpaceX wouldn't happen in my lifetime, I'd be happy to admit intuitive failure yet again, look back in 10 years at the Bolt's battery as being very quaint.
 

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As a person who totally believed that IBM's Watson would never dominate "Jeopardy" and that reusable boosters such as those of SpaceX wouldn't happen in my lifetime, I'd be happy to admit intuitive failure yet again, look back in 10 years at the Bolt's battery as being very quaint.
Well, in ten years I will be the age my dad was when he died, so we may both be right.
 
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