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We hope this may help other forum participants who have not yet purchased a Level 2 charging station. We have bought our Bolt, and are first time EV owners. (we did own a GEM car back in the day, when GEM was all that was available to us. EV--or a glorified golf cart?!) We have done a fair amount of shopping and research for a Level 2 EVSE that would suit our home and work requirements, but don't claim to be experts.

Some background on home charging stations that some folks already know. GM decided to sell a Level 2 charger for the Bolt made by a company called AeroVironment, and GM is selling the AV model EVSE-RS. I do not know what price the dealership will ask for these chargers, or whether they will be re-branded with a GM logo. This exact charger is still available on Amazon, etc.

We decided to buy the Clipper Creek HCS-40 among all the 240 volt EVSE charging stations we could research, and here's why. By the way, I'm sure most of the Level 2 charging stations on the market work very well, and if you already have one, you are probably very satisfied with your unit.

Clipper Creek's HCS-40 provides 32 Amp charging, 240 VAC, 25' of cable, a 7.7 kW charging rate, and a very nifty mount and base design. The price is $565 if you want the hardwired version, and $589 if you want a plug in model. (You can choose between a NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 6-50 plug on the power supply whip). And, they advertise Made In USA.

We have two homes and a business to deal with, and at the business there's just an outside NEMA 6-50 receptacle. Both homes are plumbed with NEMA 14-50 receptacles. Yes, we could change out the boxes at home, but we need a traveling Level 2 charger that we can use at the business (can't leave the business charger on site). So, we bought two HCS-40 chargers from Clipper Creek, one with the 14-50 male plug for the homes, and the other with the 6-50 plug. It will be a bit of a pain, but we will have to store the 6-50 plug in unit at the work place, and plug it in during the work day. Plus, if we go on the road and have a destination with only a 240 V NEMA receptacle, we can take the correct charging station for the planned destination.

One reason we were impressed with the Clipper Creek unit is because the base is substantial, and allows for secure mounting. What we will do at the (rather public, think sidewalk) business location is use heavy duty, closed hook eye bolts to mount the base, and secure the base with a pad lock through the eye bolt(s). If things go as planned, at the end of the day, take take the lock off and remove the unit. We may figure out something more clever, (please write if you know of a better security system), but our desire is simply to discourage anyone from thinking they could easily unplug our charging station and walk away.

I'm sure everyone will do a great job researching their home charging stations, but give Clipper Creek a look along with the rest. They are one the web, or call Lisa or Joel at 530-887-8527. They ship at their actual expense, with either UPS, FedEx, or Priority Mail. We got our units by Priority Mail within two days of the order. Good luck with your search!
 

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You could have made an adapter pig tail to use just one charger for both outlets for a fraction the cost of a second charger. Just an idea, but likely moot at this point. I too will likely be buying Clipper Creek.:cool:
 

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We thought about that, but are trying to not haul a charger around too much, if possible. Also, the folks at Clipper Creek were not too keen on using any sort of adapter with their equipment--duh, I bought two chargers, didn't I? Actually, Clipper Creek folks were trying to talk us out of buying the second charger, but the customer is always right--and stubborn! If it turns out we really don't need two chargers, it will be a pleasant surprise.
 

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Many folks who buy an Internet-connected EVSE find the feature redundant - Chevy EVs provide the functions that the EVSE mimics. The "connected" ones were more useful for Gen 0 EVs, and are a lot more expensive.
If you actually look inside any EVSE, it's basically just a smart relay - not much to justify a high price.
 

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I think a Clipper Creek EVSE for the home combined with a portable Adjustable Charger EVSE should cover most people wherever they go. Is the HCS-50 worth the extra cost or is the HCS-40 enough for the bolt?
 

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My understanding is that the HCS-40 is the one to get for the Bolt, people talk about "future proofing" with the HCS-50, or if you also own a higher capacity Tesla, but I figure by the time I would be upgrading, there will be an HCS-80 or something out there. Or, batteries will have evolved significantly and there will be a different mechanism for charging (like wireless).
 

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My understanding is that the HCS-40 is the one to get for the Bolt, people talk about "future proofing" with the HCS-50, or if you also own a higher capacity Tesla, but I figure by the time I would be upgrading, there will be an HCS-80 or something out there. Or, batteries will have evolved significantly and there will be a different mechanism for charging (like wireless).
****, by the time Bolt 2.0 comes out, wireless charging may be in the process of supplanting wired charging devices. In that case, future proofing is really a moot point. :)
 

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My understanding is that the HCS-40 is the one to get for the Bolt, people talk about "future proofing" with the HCS-50, or if you also own a higher capacity Tesla, but I figure by the time I would be upgrading, there will be an HCS-80 or something out there. Or, batteries will have evolved significantly and there will be a different mechanism for charging (like wireless).
If I were future proofing my installation, it would be with heavier gauge wire (and likely a bigger breaker) from the breaker box to the EVSE. Think 100 A circuit instead of 40. Easy to replace an EVSE, usually much harder to pull new wires.
 

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If I were future proofing my installation, it would be with heavier gauge wire (and likely a bigger breaker) from the breaker box to the EVSE. Think 100 A circuit instead of 40. Easy to replace an EVSE, usually much harder to pull new wires.
Everyone, if wiring new, should be wired for at least a 50 Amp breaker to support 40 Amp chargers which give up to 9.6 KWH charging. The lowest Telsa wall charger wants a 60 Amp breaker for a 48 Amp Tesla wall charger.

If you are planning on a Model 3 purchase you may want to wire for a 60 Amp breaker (6 gauge wire for shorter distances like under 40 Feet and 4 gauge for distances above 50 feet.
 

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Clipper Creek HCS-50 using 6/2 with ground as well as a 50 amp breaker. Works like a charm! While it gives me 40 amps, my hope is with the next EV, it will get to use the full 40.

Really like the Clipper Creek quality and service. Doesn't have internet compatibility, but it works great. Simple operation works for me.
 

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This may have been discussed already, but let me ask: what's the difference between stationary and portable chargers? I have a commode cistern-size GE box on the wall, and a portable charger of the same rating (7.7 kW) the size of a brick cell phone. There is no difference in speed of charging, only the portable one does get a little warmer on outside (because the box one is mostly air inside, allowing the heat to dissipate).
 

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Everyone, if wiring new, should be wired for at least a 50 Amp breaker to support 40 Amp chargers which give up to 9.6 KWH charging. The lowest Telsa wall charger wants a 60 Amp breaker for a 48 Amp Tesla wall charger.

If you are planning on a Model 3 purchase you may want to wire for a 60 Amp breaker (6 gauge wire for shorter distances like under 40 Feet and 4 gauge for distances above 50 feet.
Tesla wall chargers (EVSE) can be configured for the following breaker sizes:

15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100 (the charge rate will be derated by 20% from the breaker size)

https://www.tesla.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/wall-connector-eu/wall_connector_installation_manual_80A_en_US.pdf
page 21 in the installation manual.

All Tesla's manufactured since mid 2016 have come with 48 AMP (60 amp breaker) chargers installed in the car - with an optional 72 amp (90 AMP breaker) charger upgrade (at deliver or post delivery)
previous Teslas (earlier than mid 2016) would allow either 40 amp or 80 charge rates with single/dual chargers installed in the car.

it's widely speculated but not yet confirmed the Model 3 will also come with a 48 amp onboard charger installed in car with the same optional 72 amp (delivery or post delivery) charging option ($1500 option currently for a Model S or X)…actual facts are pending Tesla releasing the configurator for the Model 3.

as with all EV's if you plug a Tesla into a "lower amp charger/EVSE" it will only draw as much power as the charger can provide…a 48 amp "Tesla" will only charge at 32 amps if plugged into a 32 amp EVSE)

as with all EV's if you plug a Tesla into a "higher amp charger/EVSE" it will only draw as much power as the charger installed in the car can consume - a 48 amp Tesla will only charge at 48 amps if plugged into an 80 amp EVSE.

all Teslas ship with a "mobile" EVSE - Tesla Universal Mobile Charger (UMC) - that can charge from 120/volt 12/16 amps - all the way up to NEMA 14-50 plugs at a full 240v/40 amps - you can purchase various adapters for a wide range of NEMA plugs that may be encountered in the wild

Tesla's charging software allows you to "lower" the amperage the car charges at from the EVSE reported value - example I have several public chargers that I often use that offer 30 amp charge rates, but crap out after you walk away from them - I use the Tesla onboard software to lower the charging rate to 26 or 28 amps - which I have found dramatically reduces these particular chargers from crapping out mid charge session - for obvious reasons you can not use the Tesla software to attempt to charge at a rate higher than what the EVSE reports.

There is no manual control for charge rate when plugged into a Supercharger.\

all Teslas ship with a J-1772 adapter so that they can use standard EV chargers (like Clipper Creek) or public chargers - I have personally charged via a 70 AMP J-1772 charger in San Luis Obispo, and also charged at a J-1772 8 amp charger in Sausalito (almost pointless) - so not all J-1772 chargers are equal - most public chargers are 208 volts @ 30 amps - 6,000'ish watts…

Tesla superchargers are a form of DC fast charging (120,000 watts maximum) and bypass the "onboard car" chargers to directly dump electrons into the battery - Supercharging rates are not constrained buy the "size/capacity" of the car's "onboard EVSE" charger - the DC fast charging hardware on the car is widely reported to be limited to 120,000 watts

Tesla superchargers are typically rated at 160,000 watts (400 volts/400 amps) maximum capacity - but there is only one charger for ever two stalls (label A/B) - since fast DC charging rates are tapered in proportion to battery SOC% state - so the load is split between two cars if both are charging at once - by the time you're at 60% battery SOC you're only pulling 80,000 watts - so the load can be evenly split between two cars charging with out increasing charging time.

Tesla supercharger locations have anywhere from 4-24 stalls - and are expanded based on demand - not nearly fast enough, but for example Gilroy used to have only 4 stalls and now has 16 based on demand.

Tesla also makes a Chademo Adapter ($499) so that you can Chademo charging stations - I've personally used a chademo charger and seen 50,000 watts being pumped into my Tesla…

to date there are no rumors or mention of a DC-Fast adapter - but it should be technically feasible - I'm personally sad about this…

I agree with the recommendation however - install the biggest breaker/EVSE you can - even if you current EV can't charge at a faster faster rate - future EV's will benefit from higher amp chargers/breakers…also multiple EV households that pull a big circuit to the garage charging location can split the load for off-peak charging of multiple EV's while still sharing a single circuit…
 

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****, by the time Bolt 2.0 comes out, wireless charging may be in the process of supplanting wired charging devices. In that case, future proofing is really a moot point. :)
while the connection from the charger to the wireless "pad/connection" may be wireless - the "wireless" charger will still need a hardwired connection to the wireless transmitter -and it will still need power in the form of 240volt/AMPs…

so while the connection from the EVSE to the Car maybe wireless - you will still need a high-AMP circuit to "feed" the wireless transmitter…

install high-AMP wire, and the biggest breaker you can - wired or wireless chargers now or int he future will be easier to install and upgrade if you do this.
 
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