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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Big Bear?

Has anyone driven their BOLT to Big Bear? Kind of using it as an example, but figured it'd be a good one. I'm wondering if you can get UP that huge climb without running out of battery. Obviously, going down you'd regen a lot of it. But is it even possible to take the Bolt there? I'm trying to remember if I've seen any Tesla's or similar range EVs there, but can't.

Thanks!
 

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I took my Volt up there from I think the bottom of 330 up to Big Bear. I think I had one or two EV miles left. So figure on it taking about 10 kWh to get up there.
 

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I took my Volt up there from I think the bottom of 330 up to Big Bear. I think I had one or two EV miles left. So figure on it taking about 10 kWh to get up there.
Hi Cyaopec,

Thanks for the reply. Hmmm, and the Volt has about 53 mile range? I guess I just thought I'd see the BOLT EV Battery drop very quickly making that long climb up 330. But if you made it in the Volt, a Bolt shouldn't have any problem...I would hope.

I'm still trying to figure out the kWh lingo, so I'm a bit lost on that. :confused:
 

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Hi Cyaopec,

Thanks for the reply. Hmmm, and the Volt has about 53 mile range? I guess I just thought I'd see the BOLT EV Battery drop very quickly making that long climb up 330. But if you made it in the Volt, a Bolt shouldn't have any problem...I would hope.

I'm still trying to figure out the kWh lingo, so I'm a bit lost on that. :confused:
I have a Gen 1 Volt, which is EPA rated about 38 EV miles. From the bottom of 330 to Big Bear is about 14 miles. So the climb drops your range in 1/2. But you have a 60 kWh battery. So you'll use about 1/6th of the battery going up the 330. I wouldn't be worried. How far away from the 330 are you?
 

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After a full charge, you have 60kwh of energy available for use. Depending on how you drive, you will use about 4 miles per kilowatt-hour or about 240 miles.
Thanks for that breakdown. Much appreciated. :)

So, according to the poster above, it would be VERY easy (about 10 kWh) to make it up the long climb to Big Bear. I'm really surprised, as just going up the Canyons in LA seems to take off a number, although a relatively small number, of "miles." Great to hear, but I'm still a bit hesitant to give the Big Bear climb a try. HA.

One day...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have a Gen 1 Volt, which is EPA rated about 38 EV miles. From the bottom of 330 to Big Bear is about 14 miles. So the climb drops your range in 1/2. But you have a 60 kWh battery. So you'll use about 1/6th of the battery going up the 330. I wouldn't be worried. How far away from the 330 are you?

Yeah, the distance to the 330 would be something taken into consideration...but I assumed I would find a Level 3, as close as possible, before starting up the hill.

Is your comment about "the climb drops your range in 1/2" based on your experience with the Volt? Or ?

I think I'm just so new to the car, I don't yet know how much it's capable of? Very cool to hear this info from you. Appreciate you taking the time.
 

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What a great marketing tool! (GM, are you listening?) Those of you in states with famous, named peaks/mountains, drive to the top in your Bolt. How about Mt. Washington, Pike's Peak, Big Bear, Mt. Whitney, Mt. Ranier, Mt. St Helens, Black Mountain, Clingmans Dome, Spruce Knob, etc. Start with as close to FC as you can and climb as far as you can, knowing you can get back to the start with enough juice to get to home/station/outlet. Let's see how many mountains we can conquer! Take timely observations of time, altitude, temperature, SoC, miles/kWh, and kW used. Post the results here. I'm game. Who wants to join?
 

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What a great marketing tool! (GM, are you listening?) Those of you in states with famous, named peaks/mountains, drive to the top in your Bolt. How about Mt. Washington, Pike's Peak, Big Bear, Mt. Whitney, Mt. Ranier, Mt. St Helens, Black Mountain, Clingmans Dome, Spruce Knob, etc. Start with as close to FC as you can and climb as far as you can, knowing you can get back to the start with enough juice to get to home/station/outlet. Let's see how many mountains we can conquer! Take timely observations of time, altitude, temperature, SoC, miles/kWh, and kW used. Post the results here. I'm game. Who wants to join?
I visited CO earlier this summer. Made a trip up Mt. Evans....but in a rental '18 Chevy Equinox. Would have definitely been fun to take my Bolt up to the summit.
 

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To the OP, try GreenRace.
Pretty neat program for plotting trips. Measurements are metric,
but you have the ability to factor driving style and battery capacity,
like if you are only partially charged. No temperature/climate-control
compensation, but it's a great way to get a SWAG on a planned trip.
They show less than 20 kWh to get from San Bernardino up
to Big Bear, then 3kWh (!) to get back down.
 

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This pretty much matched my trip from my home in LA up the 2 to a spot called Cloudburst Summit which is at just over 7000ft. I drove 48 miles and used 19kWh used to get there, but then only 2 more kWh to get back

OP
 

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The great thing about mountain driving in an EV is that if you can get up the mountain without completely running out, you can count on being able to use regenerative braking to recharge on the way back down! I've done this many times. I once took a Leaf down nearly to zero getting to 7700 ft elevation, and was able to get back home again thanks to regenerative braking on the way back. So after getting back down, you'll have added a few extra miles thanks to gravity. Just be careful you don't let your battery get *completely* empty or the car may shut off and you won't have any brakes. The meter will indicate that you don't have enough range to get back, but on the way down you'll see the miles start increasing, the result being your total range going up and back down won't be much less than your range on level ground.
 

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This pretty much matched my trip from my home in LA up the 2 to a spot called Cloudburst Summit which is at just over 7000ft. I drove 48 miles and used 19kWh used to get there, but then only 2 more kWh to get back
Wow - 21kWh to go 96 miles... that's on track to get about 270 miles of range assuming that a full 60kWh of energy is available. That's pretty darn good for a trip that includes such a long climb.
 
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