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Exactly. I mean how many bikers follow traffic rules? Most of them blow through red lights and stop signs with no hesitation. They shout bloody murder when a motor vehicle gets a bit close to them, but they routinely drift out of bike lane. Everyone who uses the road is part of the traffic, and thus should follow the same set of rules with no exceptions.

-TL

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It's a bit of an overstatement to say "most" cyclists blow through stop signs and stop lights, especially the latter. It would be no more an overstatement say that most car drivers don't come to a complete stop and "blow through" stop signs or stop lights while turning right on red. Cars also drift in and out of their lanes, often into bike lanes. When cyclists "drift" out of bike lanes, it's usually because there is some debris in the lane that they are trying to avoid so that they don't crash and end up lying down in the traffic lane and getting run over.

I did a traffic survey a few years ago over the course of several weeks on my usual bike commute route to work in the MD/DC area. I counted 500 traffic violations by car drivers for every traffic violation by a cyclist. This included speeding, failing to stop at a stop sign or traffic light, stopping in the crosswalk, not signing turns or lane changes, driving in the bike lane, driving while holding a phone or texting, passing closer than 3 feet, etc. I'm guessing you wouldn't claim that car drivers always obey traffic rules because then we would never have car crashes.

In an increasing number of states, bicycles are legally allowed to roll slowly through a stop sign and continue on if there is no cross traffic. They can even treat a red light as a stop sign and proceed through (after stopping) if the intersection is clear. This has been the law in Idaho for almost 40 years and the number of car-bicycle crashes dropped significantly (like 30%). The reason is that the intersection is the most dangerous place for a bicycle. So, if the bike can get through the intersection when there are no cars there, it is much safer than waiting for a bunch of cars to pile up behind a bike and then everyone fights to get through the intersection when the light turns green.

Most states now have LAWS that require motorists to give at LEAST 3 feet (4 feet in PA) of room when passing a bike. The draft from a car (or, especially a truck) passing at high speed tends to suck the cyclist into the passing vehicle, so it is critical to maintain a safe passing distance. Many studies have shown (and I experience it all the time) that drivers are notoriously bad at judging how far they are from objects (like bikes and other cars) to their right (or left in countries that drive on the left) and so, yeah, it's scary when you pass me within inches. Another reason why the 3 feet rule is in effect is as I said before - the bike lane or shoulder or right lane if there is no shoulder often has debris or potholes that the cyclist must steer around and if you pass too close, you could force the cyclist into the ditch or underneath your wheels.
 

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I do a lot of cycling, over 5k miles a year, and I find that the overwhelming majority of motorists are very careful and patient when overtaking cyclists. Every once in awhile I’ll encounter a motorist who tests my accident avoidance skills, that adrenaline rush really helps on the next hill.

It’s all about respect when it comes to motorists and cyclists. Cyclists have to try not to ride like jerks, and motorists need to remember that it’s easy to kill someone on a bike, and try to avoid doing that.

When a motorist yields the right of way I usually respond with a wave, that does a lot more to encourage responsible motorist behavior than a middle finger, and I’m not about to win in any encounter with a vehicle that outweighs mine 200:1.

On a planning level, newer roadway and community designs better integrate all road traffic, cars, bikes, pedestrians, joggers, etc... This is better for everyone, as the old “streets are only for cars” design rules created many conflicts that more modern, inclusive planning can prevent.
 

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I mean how many bikers follow traffic rules? Most of them blow through red lights and stop signs with no hesitation.
You can replace the word "bikers" in this sentence with "motorists" or "pedestrians" and still find plenty of people to agree with you. All modes have their idiots.
 

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Roads should not be shared because it's not safe and it's not efficient. That said, I've done a lot of bike commuting starting from grade school and most recently my previous job had a 14 mile round trip commute. In places where there was no dedicated bike lane, it's pretty dangerous and a huge inconvenience to motorists that want to do the posted 45 MPH limit.

It was a short section, so I subjected everyone to it, but if the shared roadway was much longer I wouldn't have ridden my bike. The road was clearly intended primarily for automobiles, so I have no business slowing people down to bike speed.

I can see shared roads being a good idea if the top speed is 30 MPH or less. Even then you get hipsters on fixies going absurdly slow. Shared roads will be more sensible with autonomous driving.
 

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Roads should not be shared because it's not safe and it's not efficient. That said, I've done a lot of bike commuting starting from grade school and most recently my previous job had a 14 mile round trip commute. In places where there was no dedicated bike lane, it's pretty dangerous and a huge inconvenience to motorists that want to do the posted 45 MPH limit.

It was a short section, so I subjected everyone to it, but if the shared roadway was much longer I wouldn't have ridden my bike. The road was clearly intended primarily for automobiles, so I have no business slowing people down to bike speed.

I can see shared roads being a good idea if the top speed is 30 MPH or less. Even then you get hipsters on fixies going absurdly slow. Shared roads will be more sensible with autonomous driving.
Shared roads are safer and more efficient, at least from the perspective of all users, not just motorists, but this requires proper design. You can’t just put up a sign that says “bike route”, you have to accommodate cyclists.

The era where roads were built solely for cars is coming to an end. That’s a good thing.

By the way, you had every right to use any public roadway not restricted to motor vehicles only. It’s the idea that cyclists are somehow second class users that needs to change.
 

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The era where roads were built solely for cars is coming to an end. That’s a good thing.
Statements like this scare people because they image that it applies to all roads , but there will always be a need for highways and arterials for fast and efficient transport. What's changing is that "last mile", the streets that serve residental and commercial addresses that are the sources and destinations for traffic. These don't need to accommodate high speed throughput, vehicles spend only a small proportion of a trip on them and they can be purposed for low speed mixed traffic without a major impact on people's lives, other than making those places more pleasant to be in.
 

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Statements like this scare people because they image that it applies to all roads , but there will always be a need for highways and arterials for fast and efficient transport. What's changing is that "last mile", the streets that serve residental and commercial addresses that are the sources and destinations for traffic. These don't need to accommodate high speed throughput, vehicles spend only a small proportion of a trip on them and they can be purposed for low speed mixed traffic without a major impact on people's lives, other than making those places more pleasant to be in.
Exactly, bicycles obviously don’t belong on limited access highways and major arterial roadways, but there’s no reason not to design all other roadways with at least a decent shoulder for cyclists and pedestrians. Many urban and suburban areas are incorporating road designs that are better for all users, not just cars.
 

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Not a bicycle in sight. Most folks are walking, or riding public transit. And everybody but the owners get to inhale fumes from the coal rolling, chauffeur driven cars.

 

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The 1890s was the decade of the bicycle. Lots of bicycles here, and faster than horse drawn transport. The most interesting find was near the end....moving sidewalks!

 
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