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I was very happy with my new Chevy Bolt until a week ago when I received a cryptic text from my car telling me an error had occurred. OnStar then sent a diagnostic email that a critical error had occurred. When I got into the vehicle to drive to work that morning the indicator gauge showed almost full charge but range said 10 miles (I had driven just fine the day before with about 150 miles of range left when parked in drive way). The service vehicle light was on so figured I would see if I could drive to dealer...NO GO. Attempting to shift the transmission into anything other than Neutral or Park resulted in a beep and a error in the cluster saying roughly "Incorrect conditions to shift". I had the vehicle towed to the dealer and was given a loaner (gas Malibu). It has been there all week and I have just received notice that GM has indicated that the battery needs to be replaced...they are sending a battery....will take a couple days to install once it arrives could be another 2 weeks. All of this is being covered under warrantee. I have contacted Chevrolet asking for replacement. I paid for a brand new car NOT a car that within a month would require major repair by the dealer. So far they claim that nothing else can be done...UNACCEPTABLE!
Has anyone else seen similar issues? :(
 

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Is this the first brand new car that you've bought? I know that it's a bummer to have it out of service for such a long time, but expecting them to replace the whole car is quite unrealistic, IMHO. However they should certainly provide you with a loaner vehicle to use in the meantime, considering it will take such a long time before your car is ready.
 

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Sean, good to see you in this forum as well as MyChevyBolt...please go a refer to my response to your post there. I love the "you must be naive because your new car broke" responses I have gotten. Really? Why would I not be expected to hold a multibillion dollar corporation to living up to their promise of a high quality product. Yes they have agreed to fix under warrantee (major work done by dealer technicians as opposed to experienced assembly line technician). If you are so surprised by my reaction simply go to amazon and do a search on "refurb" and see all the discounted products that were returned and fixed by the manufacturer...discounted because they didn't meet the original quality and had to be fixed. So once this fix is done my car will be a "refurb" and if all the work is listed in the history of the vehicle which all major work will be then probably taking a hit on the resale value.
 

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Not seeing a lot of refurbished cars on amazon...

I too got the cryptic Onstar text, and the 'conditions incorrect for shifting' message. Had to get a tow to the dealer. It took a week and a lot of follow up to finally get a diagnosis. In my case, they said it was a bad 'heater control unit', not a bad battery. I do not have great confidence that they actually diagnose these things correctly - large numbers of supposedly Bolt-trained service 'professionals' seem to know next to nothing about the Bolt, based on what they've been able to tell me. Nonetheless, I did get the car back after two full weeks, and it has worked properly since then.

I did not expect the car to be replaced, and I wouldn't really have any greater confidence or expectations with a new car than my 'refurbished' one. It's basically a crapshoot either way.

Good luck.
 

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Phil, thanks for the input. Glad your situation got resolved. I am a fan of the car. For the month I had it I was perfectly happy with it. That is why I am looking for replacement and not a buy back.It is your statement about the "Bolt-trained professionals" that raises my concern. If there is no confidence in diagnosing then definitely dont want my car to be disassembled and reassembled by them. Again thanks for the input.
 

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Welcome to the forums John! It sucks to hear of this problem. It sounds like Chevy doing what they can and you'll be back on the road soon.

We all have to remember that we are all early adopters and we all know what they say about buying version 1.0 of anything... It's the downside of going first. I know you are hoping for a "do over", but it's unrealistic. I have never heard of any car company anywhere swapping out for a new car under a warranty claim. Your car is actually being fixed faster than most Tesla owners experience. Their warranty claims can take months.

Look at this way, your car became a used car the day you drove it off the lot. A used car is always worth less than new. Soon your car will be a used car with a brand new battery and that will make it more valuable than all the other used Bolts like mine. I don't know how many miles you got before failure, but basically, they were free and now you are getting a battery do over. I'm actually hoping my battery will fall... in year seven. >:)
 

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Real sorry to hear your situation but I do have to agree with everyone else..

You've loved the Bolt before when it was running perfectly and you'll love it again after you get it back. With a brand new battery, it'll be fresher than it was before and therefore better! Unfortunately, it happened a lot earlier than expected but hey, they're still taking care of it and will get it done as soon as they can. Yes they aren't "assembly line technicians" but for something like replacing a battery, they don't need to be. They'll follow a direct procedure and that will be it.
 

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Sean, good to see you in this forum as well as MyChevyBolt...please go a refer to my response to your post there. I love the "you must be naive because your new car broke" responses I have gotten. Really? Why would I not be expected to hold a multibillion dollar corporation to living up to their promise of a high quality product. Yes they have agreed to fix under warrantee (major work done by dealer technicians as opposed to experienced assembly line technician). If you are so surprised by my reaction simply go to amazon and do a search on "refurb" and see all the discounted products that were returned and fixed by the manufacturer...discounted because they didn't meet the original quality and had to be fixed. So once this fix is done my car will be a "refurb" and if all the work is listed in the history of the vehicle which all major work will be then probably taking a hit on the resale value.
Apple is a multi-billion dollar corporation and if I buy a new iPhone and the battery fails while under warranty I'm pretty sure all I'm going to get is a new battery. Wouldn't really expect anything else. That is what warranties are all about. As previous posters have said you will be ahead anyway since your battery will be new and in terms of battery wear all your miles up to the failure were "free".
 

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Maybe look on the bright side?? If it were a few years from now it would not have to be a new battery. It would be refurbished and possibly have a little SOC loss. I would look on the bright side, that it will be a brand new battery.
 

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Most warranty terms allow for the manufacturer to repair or replace the product at their discretion. Their discretion is based upon the economics of the situation, whether the cost to repair the car is less than the cost to replace the car. In your case it appears to be a failure within the battery circuity. A part broke somewhere within the battery and is preventing the current to flow. The battery is apparently the lowest replaceable unit (LRU) designed to be replaced when the failure that happened to your car which made the car inoperable. Had the failure damaged the vehicle, say if it overheated, caught fire, and burned the car, then you would expect a replacement vehicle from Chevrolet. With electronics, component failure happens early on in the life of the unit or never happens at all for the lifetime the product or component is designed for; it's called mean time between failure (MTBF). All manufactured products or components have a MTBF, warranty terms and parts logistics are based on MTBF calculations. Your battery fell outside the norm, and needs replacement. It means nothing in relationship to the quality of the assembled car, just one component of it; which is why GM will not replace the vehicle. Expecting a replacement vehicle is not warranted in your situation.

I hope you get your car back as soon as possible. I 100% expect that the dealership will be shipping the battery back to Detroit for GM to analyse the failure.
 

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Lets hope that once they replace the battery assembly that's the end of it!

With the vague diagnosis they're offering it seems like it's a fingers crossed situation that replacing the pack is the fix.
 

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Repairing a new car

I have had a number of new vehicles most of which did not have any issues. Having said that I was an early adopter of Toyota's Prius. Initially there were problems and Toyota responded by making the necessary repairs. If you read your warranty you will see what they can and often do to repair a vehicle. Perhaps in the future a battery will not be replaced but the problem associated with it will be diagnosed and dealt with. These batteries are not simple given that there are many individual units that must be balanced to insure correct performance. At the present I am sure that GM wants all problems to be directed to them and they want to do the diagnostics. So rather than repair GM is getting valuable information as to failures from the field. Not necessarily unusual for such a milestone vehicle as the Bolt represents. Getting a brand new car as a replacement is really rare. They are almost always repaired. Sometimes when you experience a failure like this the warranty will be extended or maintenance will be offered for free. You can always ask if they will goodwill future maintenance. The Bolt as I mentioned is a milestone vehicle. GM is probably not making a lot of money on this car. They are trying to get ahead of industry and develop their market. I applaud them for even making this car. No one else in the World has an equivalent vehicle to the Bolt that is in production and being sold to the public. Think about it.
Manny
 

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When I first got my Volt back in 2011 I had the car for three days, I got into the car and it was a brick. Pushed the onstar button and off to the dealership it went. They couldn't figure it out for a couple days and then the factory tech came up from Detroit and said there was a short in the drive battery. It took about a week to get one from the factory, in it went and the car has been perfect ever since. They paid for my rental AND the gas for it. Apologized profusely and gave me the extended bumper to bumper warranty. The thing with electronics is they either work flawlessly or the blow like a light bulb. Unfortunately you got the bulb that blew right away. S#£t happens. GM should take care of you and I'd say it's premature to demand a replacement car.
 

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Battery replacement

Welcome to the forums John! It sucks to hear of this problem. It sounds like Chevy doing what they can and you'll be back on the road soon.

We all have to remember that we are all early adopters and we all know what they say about buying version 1.0 of anything... It's the downside of going first. I know you are hoping for a "do over", but it's unrealistic. I have never heard of any car company anywhere swapping out for a new car under a warranty claim. Your car is actually being fixed faster than most Tesla owners experience. Their warranty claims can take months.

Look at this way, your car became a used car the day you drove it off the lot. A used car is always worth less than new. Soon your car will be a used car with a brand new battery and that will make it more valuable than all the other used Bolts like mine. I don't know how many miles you got before failure, but basically, they were free and now you are getting a battery do over. I'm actually hoping my battery will fall... in year seven. >:)
Reading about this battery problem reminds me of when I had my 2013 Leaf.
I charged it to 100% every day so that I could make my commute. The salesperson told me when I leased it, that since I'm probably not going to buy it, go ahead and charge it to 100% rather than the optional 80%.

When I was ready to turn it in after the two-year lease, they tried to sell me the $28,000 car for $8800!
I told them that if it lost just one of the 12 bars, I would not be able to make my daily commute.
The rep said "No problem. Nissan can sell you a new battery for $5500, $100 a month with no interest"??? He also said that the new battery was only guaranteed to have 9 of 12 bars when it's installed??? I thought that was crazy, but that's what he said.
 

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The battery is apparently the lowest replaceable unit (LRU) designed to be replaced when the failure that happened to your car which made the car inoperable.
This is actually a good point. The OP seems to be upset that his battery is being swapped out and that it's going to be done by service techs that have probably never done this. But just imagine if GM wanted to replace a controller board inside the battery or perhaps a cell group. That would be even more disassembly and reassembly of mysterious components.

It's not like replacing a Bolt battery is as easy as replacing the battery in a phone (at least if it's not an iPhone). But the battery is probably one of the easier things to replace, certainly less difficult than, say, a faulty gearbox. The biggest difficulty with procedure is the weight of the battery, but that's not a big deal for a dealership with the proper equipment.
 

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It's not like replacing a Bolt battery is as easy as replacing the battery in a phone (at least if it's not an iPhone). But the battery is probably one of the easier things to replace, certainly less difficult than, say, a faulty gearbox. The biggest difficulty with procedure is the weight of the battery, but that's not a big deal for a dealership with the proper equipment.
I replaced the battery pack in my Leaf (I missed the free replacement by a couple months). It was pretty easy. Remove a fuse, jack up the car. Put a couple jacks under the battery pack. Disconnect a couple wire harnesses. Remove about 50 bolts. Lower the pack and slide it out from under the car. Reverse the procedure to reinstall.

My guess is that the Bolt's pack is just as easy to replace.

Ed
 

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^ GM uses liquid cooling for the Bolt battery pack, so there's in and out hose connections for cooling, of course that means draining the cooling system, purging it on refill, checking for leaks, etc... which adds a few steps to the procedure. But, overall not very complicated.

 

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^ GM uses liquid cooling for the Bolt battery pack, so there's in and out hose connections for cooling, of course that means draining the cooling system, purging it on refill, checking for leaks, etc... which adds a few steps to the procedure. But, overall not very complicated.
Good point. I forgot that.

Ed
 

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Good to know that GM will send over a factory tech if the dealership guys can't figure it out, at lest they won't be taking pot shots when diagnosing the Bolt.
 

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this all sounds concerning to me.
do you think it would be prudent to have the car brought it to the dealer for a full diagnostic, i don't know, a check of that 'heating unit' just to see if all is working correctly? i would hate for this to happen to me.
for those two here that have had the issue.
model? Lt or Premier
location? CA or Oregon?
build week?
mileage when it happened?
more info please
 
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