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Hi,

As a new owner I’ve tried to read back almost a year in the forum and I don’t recall a recent conversation about this. Somewhere (in the manual or elsewhere) I remember reading that the batteries can be harmed by temperatures either below 32 degrees or above 90 degrees. So, my question is what are people doing about this? I know that the Bolt has liquid cooling/heating but I believe in order for this to work you have to be plugged in? My assumption is that most people are leaving their EV’s plugged in overnight to make sure that the temps are right but what about a work sitatuion where you have to leave your Bolt in a parking lot in Arizona where temperatures are easily over 100 degrees? What then?

As always any and all thoughts/ideas appreciated!

Peter
 

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The battery conditioning system will work even if it is not plugged in. For a while I did not leave it plugged in and as the weather turned colder (midcoast Maine) the battery was lower in the morning than the previous evening. The conditioning will continue anywhere as long as there is enough electricity in the battery. I think it is best to have the system in hilltop mode so it does not charge to 100% if the charging plug is in all the time.
 

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Wouldn't worry about it, the Bolt will take care of itself except for a prolonged cold soak at -30F or something like that. The myChevrolet App can be set to message a cold weather warning if problematic temperatures are forecast in the next 36 hours.
 
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Hilltop reserve?

I didn’t drive my Bolt yesterday, but parked it the day before (in cold garage) with about 65% SOC with a 12A 110v plug attached, which charged it to 80% overnight (HT reserve was on, so this is good). But with car still plugged in a day later, I see that the SOC this morning is now 88%. Wanted to leave it plugged in due to extreme cold temps overnight in MI, but apparently you can’t do this if you don’t drive the car everyday. Perhaps some sort of departure timer workaround will overcome this, but since I’m new to EV charging habits, just thought I’d mention it. Seeing input from others that the battery takes care of itself if it has sufficient charge, I’ll try leaving it unplugged on a night where it’s below freezing and the car doesn’t NEED to charge.
 

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I didn’t drive my Bolt yesterday, but parked it the day before (in cold garage) with about 65% SOC with a 12A 110v plug attached, which charged it to 80% overnight (HT reserve was on, so this is good). But with car still plugged in a day later, I see that the SOC this morning is now 88%.
Hilltop reserve is 90% so that's why it continued to charge past 80%
 

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I didn’t drive my Bolt yesterday, but parked it the day before (in cold garage) with about 65% SOC with a 12A 110v plug attached, which charged it to 80% overnight (HT reserve was on, so this is good). But with car still plugged in a day later, I see that the SOC this morning is now 88%. Wanted to leave it plugged in due to extreme cold temps overnight in MI, but apparently you can’t do this if you don’t drive the car everyday. Perhaps some sort of departure timer workaround will overcome this, but since I’m new to EV charging habits, just thought I’d mention it. Seeing input from others that the battery takes care of itself if it has sufficient charge, I’ll try leaving it unplugged on a night where it’s below freezing and the car doesn’t NEED to charge.
If you read the manual, you will find that GM recommends keeping it plugged in at temps below 32 degrees, even if fully charged.
 

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New to this forum. Purchased my Bolt about 30 days ago and have been reading everything I can find.

I've been concerned recently because we are experiencing below freezing temps daily now. I keep my car in the garage and plugged in to 240v when home but during the day she is out in the wild for around 12 hours. There are no plugs at my office. Should I be leaving the Bolt at home during these conditions?
 

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I didn’t drive my Bolt yesterday, but parked it the day before (in cold garage) with about 65% SOC with a 12A 110v plug attached, which charged it to 80% overnight (HT reserve was on, so this is good). But with car still plugged in a day later, I see that the SOC this morning is now 88%. Wanted to leave it plugged in due to extreme cold temps overnight in MI, but apparently you can’t do this if you don’t drive the car everyday. Perhaps some sort of departure timer workaround will overcome this, but since I’m new to EV charging habits, just thought I’d mention it. Seeing input from others that the battery takes care of itself if it has sufficient charge, I’ll try leaving it unplugged on a night where it’s below freezing and the car doesn’t NEED to charge.
You can use the departure timer for this, but it's crude. There is no way to set the timer for further into the future than the next day, i.e. I have not found a way to set any day of the week timer to --:-- for the charge schedule which is very unfortunate.

What I have found you can do, is use the peak rates feature to get longer plugged in duration without increasing the battery SOC the entire time. If you set weekdays to peak rate for the entire 24 hours, and set weekends to off-peak for the whole 24 hours, and tell the departure charging to use off-peak only - it won't charge during the weekdays. The battery conditioning will still run using AC power using this method.
 

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New to this forum. Purchased my Bolt about 30 days ago and have been reading everything I can find.

I've been concerned recently because we are experiencing below freezing temps daily now. I keep my car in the garage and plugged in to 240v when home but during the day she is out in the wild for around 12 hours. There are no plugs at my office. Should I be leaving the Bolt at home during these conditions?
No, just drive it. The Bolt’s battery thermal management will work as needed whether the Bolt is plugged in or not. Range will certainly take a hit in very cold weather, but there’s no need to be concerned in sub-freezing weather.

Also, one of the energy displays shows a breakdown of energy used between driving, climate controls, and battery conditioning.
 
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Battery handling at cold temps

The manual states that you should plug in when it’s cold out, but doesn’t seem to mention if the battery electronics will take care of the battery if you are not plugged in, like parked at work. It appears that it does - after reading comments here. Preconditioning would be encouraged when starting out from an “after work” scenario, but it seems that there would be a minimum charge level required in order for the battery to support self heating. Has anyone found what this minimum is? If a car sat unplugged at low temps - unused for multiple days - the car will cry wolf if the battery reaches that critical charge level - assuming the App notifications have been turned on?
 
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