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Love my Bolt. 4,000 miles on it thus far. I never get flat tires, but yesterday at around noon, I received an email generated by the diagnostics app that I had a front, driver's side flat tire. Indeed I did -- 0 psi, flat as a pancake. Car was in a parkade. Called Chevrolet roadside assistance to arrange for help/possible tow. We used the electric pump and sealant canister to fill the tire up enough to drive it out of the parkade and get the car onto the transport truck. (The sealant did not stop the tire from leaking, though it may have slowed it down a bit.) So off to the nearest Chevrolet dealership we went. The folks there were attentive (and curious). First of all, the tire had a regular dry wall screw in the area that should self seal. The tire did not self seal. The dealership people said they have seen this before, and that the self seal function of the car is probably only good for small nails at best. Second, they cannot repair these tires (no patch system, etc.), Only thing they could do was replace the tire. Third, no Chevy dealerships in the Seattle area had replacement tires in stock yet (which they found curious based on their experiences with other new model releases). Said it would be 2 weeks at least. Happily, the service manager had ordered one such tire directly from Michelin to have in the shop so people could see it, etc. They used that to replace my tire. They were suspect of this new sealant technology. The service manage even suggested that I use other types of tires when these wear out.

I found all this odd. The bottom line is that I paid $260 for a new tire to replace a tire with only 4,000 miles on it that had been punctured by a regular drywall screw. As I read the owner's manual more, I found the language there odd. The sealant unit that comes with the car is meant to temporarily fix the tire if it does not self seal and if the hole is small enough (must have to be pretty small). You are supposed to take it to the dealership at that point for "repair of replacement". However, the dealership said there is no way they could repair these new tires, so replacement was the only option. I lucked out that they happened to have one new 'demonstration tire' at the dealership that they had received only this week.

So, a flat tire on a Bolt appears to be a major deal if for any reason the tire does not self seal. Will be interesting to hear other flat tire experiences on this forum.
 

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Called Chevrolet roadside assistance to arrange for help/possible tow.
Thanks for the post. On this part could you elaborate that process?

  • You used the OnStar service, correct?
  • Are you subscribed to the roadside assistance level?
  • Is it true they will only tow you to a dealership?
  • How fast was the response?
  • Thoughts on the service?
Thanks -
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I used the OnStar service. Roadside Assistance service came with my purchase for a period of time (cannot remember details). Purchased the car at end of August.. I did not ask about having it towed elsewhere -- I was only offered towing to Chevy dealership of my choice. Good response time -- phone in at around 11 a.m., was on phone with OnStar for about 20 minutes. Tow service showed up about 12:15. Good service -- the only issues were than neither the towing guy nor I knew the car well enough to figure things out (e.g., trying to inflate the tire with the car's equipment; keeping the car in neutral while it was being towed onto the towing truck bed, etc.).
 

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the tire had a regular dry wall screw in the area that should self seal.
I'd really question why they couldn't repair that slight damage. Granted, the dealership isn't a real tire shop and made a lot more money with a lot less hassle by selling you a new tire.

Because I'm always curious about such things, I'd have taken that tire to a Michelin dealer and said, "WTF?"

jack vines
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'd really question why they couldn't repair that slight damage. Granted, the dealership isn't a real tire shop and made a lot more money with a lot less hassle by selling you a new tire.

Because I'm always curious about such things, I'd have taken that tire to a Michelin dealer and said, "WTF?"

jack vines

Yup...contacted a Michelin dealer. He confirmed the tire cannot be patched. I asked him if it sounds correct that the car should not self seal after being punctured by a 1 1/4 inch drywall screw. He said it depends on how the screw punctured the tired. I asked him about calling Michelin itself. He said I could try, but he in his experience they would not budge on something like this.

So, the general sense I have is that while the self-sealing technology might work in some normal circumstances, clearly it does not in others. Thus, not having a spare is a potential problem. The Chevy dealership guys were thinking that it would be better to have made-for-EVs all-season tires on the vehicle instead of this new fangled tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wish I had know about this!!!! I will share this with the Chevy dealership. Surprised that the Michelin dealer did not refer to/know about this. Thanks...
 

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Love my Bolt. 4,000 miles on it thus far. I never get flat tires, but yesterday at around noon, I received an email generated by the diagnostics app that I had a front, driver's side flat tire. Indeed I did -- 0 psi, flat as a pancake. Car was in a parkade. Called Chevrolet roadside assistance to arrange for help/possible tow. We used the electric pump and sealant canister to fill the tire up enough to drive it out of the parkade and get the car onto the transport truck. (The sealant did not stop the tire from leaking, though it may have slowed it down a bit.)
Wait, your car came with an electric pump and sealant can? Sounds like my dealership might have shortchanged me again. I had to go back to get the 120V charger because it wasn't in the back.
 

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...I received an email generated by the diagnostics app that I had a front, driver's side flat tire.
When I got back home and fired up my computer today I had a momentary panic when I saw a similar email. But then I remembered that at the time the email had been sent my car was in the tire shop having snow tires mounted. :|
 

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Wait, your car came with an electric pump and sealant can? Sounds like my dealership might have shortchanged me again. I had to go back to get the 120V charger because it wasn't in the back.
My Bolt came with sealant and an electric pump. I'm in Canada, where DC Fast Charging is standard equipment on all Bolts so I don't know those kinds of accessories are different here.

I actually tried the electric pump today - it works pretty well. It's got a built-in pressure gauge that's actually lighted. It makes a heck of a racket, but it gets the job done.
 

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No Spare Tire!

Three weeks into my ownership and I suffered a deflating tire due to a 3 inch construction screw in the tread. Sealant wasn't stopping the leak, but slowed it enough that I could re-inflate it and then take it to a tire repair shop. They did a standard repair, using a plug. However, the liquid sealant in that tire is now gone. I have three tires with sealant, and one with no protection. I went to a dealer to ask "What now?". I also inquired about purchasing an emergency spare. The advice from both the service and parts departments was to just carry some "fix-a-flat" and a compressor. (my standard model does not come with either of these). Parts also said there is no available spare for the Bolt. I find that a bit surprising. Apparently, the plan in case of a puncture that can't be resealed is to park it and call for a tow.
Anyone else with experience or advice on this?
 

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Three weeks into my ownership and I suffered a deflating tire due to a 3 inch construction screw in the tread. Sealant wasn't stopping the leak, but slowed it enough that I could re-inflate it and then take it to a tire repair shop. They did a standard repair, using a plug. However, the liquid sealant in that tire is now gone. I have three tires with sealant, and one with no protection. I went to a dealer to ask "What now?". I also inquired about purchasing an emergency spare. The advice from both the service and parts departments was to just carry some "fix-a-flat" and a compressor. (my standard model does not come with either of these). Parts also said there is no available spare for the Bolt. I find that a bit surprising. Apparently, the plan in case of a puncture that can't be resealed is to park it and call for a tow.
Anyone else with experience or advice on this?
Luckily no personal experience on this, It has been over three decades of driving since I have had a flat tire. It has become standard in the past decade or more that new cars do not come with spares and only supply a sealant can and air pump or run-flat tires. This saves weight and cost.

Because of the cost of run-flat tires, I plan to replace with standard tires when mine are worn out and do as was suggested to you, carry a pump and sealant can.

[ame]https://www.amazon.com/Fix-Flat-S50073-Ultimate-1-Step/dp/B00PRJI9O8[/ame]
 

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This topic is discussed to death in many other threads.

The best option is to carry pliers, tire plug kit and an inflator. 90% of punctures can be fixed with a plug kit. It takes 5 minutes to repair a typical puncture, and you can leave the wheel on the vehicle. Waiting for the inflator will take more time, but it works.

Goo is mostly worthless. I'd never use it.

Don't know why people are calling for help when screws/nails are pretty common, and it takes more time to wait for someone to arrive than to just fix the problem.

 

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However, the liquid sealant in that tire is now gone.
Who says this? My understanding is there is not so much a liquid, but rubbery paste that has been applied inside the tire. It doesn't go away, or get used up when there is a leak. Your patched tire is fine. No need for a new one.

Here's what it looks like inside-

 

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The best option is to carry pliers, tire plug kit and an inflator.
This is a subjective issue, but IMHO the best option is to carry an actual, real spare tire. A full sized OEM tire mounted on an OEM wheel fits very nicely below the "false floor" with plenty of extra space for a jack, wrench, portable EVSE, etc. etc.
 

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This is a subjective issue, but IMHO the best option is to carry an actual, real spare tire. A full sized OEM tire mounted on an OEM wheel fits very nicely below the "false floor" with plenty of extra space for a jack, wrench, portable EVSE, etc. etc.
Yes! There are those that can DIY and those who can not ;)
 
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