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Most I have gotten is 60 miles after 30 min charge. I've tried with battery near empty at several stations. Ac on and off. Charger says I'm getting 100 amps. And 320 volts
 

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Most I have gotten is 60 miles after 30 min charge. I've tried with battery near empty at several stations. Ac on and off. Charger says I'm getting 100 amps. And 320 volts
You will not be able to get anywhere near 90 miles in 30 minutes on a 100 amp max DCFC.

To get CLOSE to 90 miles in 30 minutes (based off the 238 mile EPA range), you will need to charge from a 125 amp DCFC.

The most I've ever seen is 22.27 kWh in a 30 minute session. As even DCFC'ing is not 100% efficient (probably a 5% loss or so), that 22.27 kWh from the station is probably more like 21.2 kWh into the actual battery.
21.2 kWh / 60 usable = 35.33% of the usable battery. 35.33% of 238 EPA miles = 84 EPA miles in 30 minutes.

If the SOC levels are juuuust right, I think it is possible to get 90 EPA miles in 30 minutes from a 125 amp DCFC.
 

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How would I know if a station is capable of 125amp ? . I have charged at several and they all charge at 100 then they drop down as the charging goes on

Have you every been to a 125a station?

Chevy says Im getting a lot less than 90 miles because of my driving habits or AC on, not because of 100a charging
 

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How would I know if a station is capable of 125amp ? . I have charged at several and they all charge at 100 then they drop down as the charging goes on

Have you every been to a 125a station?

Chevy says Im getting a lot less than 90 miles because of my driving habits or AC on, not because of 100a charging
Probably someone reading from a script.
Some of the factors that dictate DC Level 2 charging (L3 is >90kW)
1) Capabilities of the charger. If you plug into an AC L2 EVSE that only provides 16A, you can't take full advantage of the 32A charger in the Bolt. Same holds true for the DCFC station. If it provides less than the maximum amount the car can handle, charging will be slower.
2) Battery SOC
3) Battery temperatures
4) Ambient temperatures

Chevy tried to make it simple for those new to EV's by giving a mileage number instead of kWh or battery percentage (and note that they say "up to 90 miles". Any way you state it can create confusion.

Just like total range, range from xx minutes of charge will vary greatly. Driving 80 mph on the freeway will yield very different results than 25 mph around town. Subzero vs 70 degrees vs 108 also have much different range for a given amount of energy. Terrain, wind, humidity and altitude are also factors. All these thing affect the range of an ICE vehicle as well, but the speed and availability of refueling make people forget about them.
 

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I spoke to EVGo today. They said all their chargers, included the ones I have used are capable of 125A. They looked up my last 2 charging sessions and they said I received 1792kwh 1 time and 1839 the other. When I Asked how did a friend of mine with the same car get 2227 kwh they didnt know???
 

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Most I have gotten is 60 miles after 30 min charge. I've tried with battery near empty at several stations. Ac on and off. Charger says I'm getting 100 amps. And 320 volts

Where are you charging where you are getting 100 amps. I thought I read all DCfast in the US are only 50amp max. Curious. From what I read, the Bolt can only take 80amps using dcfast.
 

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How would I know if a station is capable of 125amp ? . I have charged at several and they all charge at 100 then they drop down as the charging goes on

Have you every been to a 125a station?

Chevy says Im getting a lot less than 90 miles because of my driving habits or AC on, not because of 100a charging
A 125A station should have a label that looks likes the attached photo. In the lower left you can see it's labeled as 50 kW and then lists that it's a 125A and 500V unit.

If you plug into a station with less than 50% SOC, and that station is capable of 125A , then you should see the car pulling 43 to 46 kW. If you are at less than 50% and the car is only pulling 33 to 36 kW, then that station is a 100A one.
 

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Where are you charging where you are getting 100 amps. I thought I read all DCfast in the US are only 50amp max. Curious. From what I read, the Bolt can only take 80amps using dcfast.
I think you mean kW, not amps.

DC Fast chargers in the US are currently limited to a max rate of 50 kW. Those 50 kW stations can either be 100A/500V or 125A/400V. There are also 60A/400V 24 kW stations.
 

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You are correct, I meant Kw. Sorry I got mixed up.

So in the original post he said he was charging at 100 amp and 320 volts. Wouldn't that only be 32kw. Or 16kw in a half hour. If we get roughly 4 miles per kw (4 X 16 = 64 miles). ~60 miles would be correct. However if the charger is capable of more but only negotiated a certain draw, that would be a potential problem as the car is capable of 80 with bleed down as it charges? I guess the question is, what is his charger capable of?

Let me know if I got this right...
 

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I happened to call EVgo today and was told that all their Level 3 chargers in the US are 480 volt, 125 amp (60 kW) chargers. This is the max (optimal conditions) however and no one ever gets that. I DID get 75 added miles in 30 minutes at the Hagerstown Premium Outlets station (EVgo). I wonder how many miles I would have added if I had charged for another 30 minutes (another $9.95). Fewer, I guarantee.

Where is it posted or published that all US DCFC is limited to 50 kW? I am not denying this but wonder where that data came from.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Evgo tells me the same thing they can output 480 volt, 125 amp for a Bolt no problem.

Problem for me:
When ever I charge I only see 100 amps on the charging station . After 3o min: I received 1792kwh 1 time and 1839 the other. How do I get 2227 kwh that has been reported above

Does my battery need to be below 50% or less before charging?

I brought my car to Chevy today and they said it is because I had 18 amp instead of 24 amp in settings. I think that applies to level 2 not level 3 chargers.. Dealer said he didnt know
 

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EVgo is WRONG. They definitely have numerous 100 amp max DCFC stations in existence. I just used 3 separate ones this past weekend.
 

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Where is it posted or published that all US DCFC is limited to 50 kW? I am not denying this but wonder where that data came from.
I don't know that it's actually published anywhere in that form, I think it just comes from nobody ever having found a faster one. That's probably because before the Bolt no CCS-compatible cars have been able to handle anything higher.
 

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I happened to call EVgo today and was told that all their Level 3 chargers in the US are 480 volt, 125 amp (60 kW) chargers. This is the max (optimal conditions) however and no one ever gets that. I DID get 75 added miles in 30 minutes at the Hagerstown Premium Outlets station (EVgo). I wonder how many miles I would have added if I had charged for another 30 minutes (another $9.95). Fewer, I guarantee.

Where is it posted or published that all US DCFC is limited to 50 kW? I am not denying this but wonder where that data came from.
The current SAE CCS standard in the US only goes up to 125A/500V, which is 62.5 kW. I can't find the specific SAE specicifiaction that spells this out because their stuff is behind a paywall. Higher charging rates such as 100 kW, 150 kW and 350 kW rates have been proposed, but details are lacking, like maximum pack voltage, maximum current that can be delivered, etc.

While the current spec says that 62.5 kW is possible, that's only if you had a 500V battery pack that could accept the full 125A of current that the station can deliver. We Bolt owners are limited to ~45 kW because we have a battery pack that has a nominal voltage of 360V. 125A times 360V equals 45 kW. In reality, the pack voltage varies from ~324V when almost fully discharged up to 400V when fully charged. You can get a 47 kW charge rate for a little bit because the pack voltage has risen to ~376V and the station is delivering the full 125A of current available. But soon after that the Bolt requests that the current gets dropped because it needs to throttle back the charging rate to avoid frying the battery.
 

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The current SAE CCS standard in the US only goes up to 125A/500V, which is 62.5 kW. I can't find the specific SAE specicifiaction that spells this out because their stuff is behind a paywall. Higher charging rates such as 100 kW, 150 kW and 350 kW rates have been proposed, but details are lacking, like maximum pack voltage, maximum current that can be delivered, etc.

While the current spec says that 62.5 kW is possible, that's only if you had a 500V battery pack that could accept the full 125A of current that the station can deliver. We Bolt owners are limited to ~45 kW because we have a battery pack that has a nominal voltage of 360V. 125A times 360V equals 45 kW. In reality, the pack voltage varies from ~324V when almost fully discharged up to 400V when fully charged. You can get a 47 kW charge rate for a little bit because the pack voltage has risen to ~376V and the station is delivering the full 125A of current available. But soon after that the Bolt requests that the current gets dropped because it needs to throttle back the charging rate to avoid frying the battery.
I'm just curious about the sticker on the station you posted above. It clearly states 125 amps at 500 volts, but also clearly says it's 50kw. To me that means it must be self limiting, or that it has the potential to deliver 62.5kw, but they only guarantee 50kw. Kind of a strange swindle all this charging stuff. That's why I just charge at home over night and only take gas cars on a long trip.
 

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I'm just curious about the sticker on the station you posted above. It clearly states 125 amps at 500 volts, but also clearly says it's 50kw.
I believe it means it can supply a maximum of 125A OR 500V, but not both at the same time. You'll get 500V at 100A or 400V at 125A.
 

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I believe it means it can supply a maximum of 125A OR 500V, but not both at the same time. You'll get 500V at 100A or 400V at 125A.
Ok, thanks for the heads up. Just more mysterious fuzzy logic to annoy the general public. Why don't people feel confident in traveling long distances with a BEV?? :rolleyes:
 

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The current SAE CCS standard in the US only goes up to 125A/500V, which is 62.5 kW. I can't find the specific SAE specicifiaction that spells this out because their stuff is behind a paywall. Higher charging rates such as 100 kW, 150 kW and 350 kW rates have been proposed, but details are lacking, like maximum pack voltage, maximum current that can be delivered, etc.
You're thinking of CHAdeMO's original limits. CCS is already specified for 500V at 200A or 100 kW but essentially all of the actual charger implementations on the market and installed in public are limited to the CHAdeMO power spec because lower powered chargers are cheaper to build and very few EVs on the market were capable of charging faster than 125A.

Both CHAdeMO and CCS have promised equivalent specs now for 500V at 350A and 1,000V at 350A. My understanding is that the CCS specification has passed its critical spec voting. I'm not sure about the status of CHAdeMO for 500V at 350A. Some vendors like ChargePoint have built hardware capable of doing 400A and are advocating for a spec upgrade vote to make that official but I'm not sure if it has been approved yet. ChargePoint was saying back in January that they expected to begin shipping their new chargers capable of 1,000V at 350A (or 400A) sometime about now.

There are already a couple of 500V at 200A chargers from Delta Electronics installed in Norway as of late last year and Kia Soul EVs using CHAdeMO and an Ioniq Electric using CCS were both charged at one of those units at peak power rates of about 70 kW. All signs point to the Bolt being capable of peaking at around 55 kW near 150A but that has not been fully proven yet at a public charging station. There are Opel Ampera-e cars already on the road in Norway but nobody has yet claimed to have charged one of them using either of the 200A CCS chargers there.
 

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The current SAE CCS standard in the US only goes up to 125A/500V, which is 62.5 kW. I can't find the specific SAE specicifiaction that spells this out because their stuff is behind a paywall. Higher charging rates such as 100 kW, 150 kW and 350 kW rates have been proposed, but details are lacking, like maximum pack voltage, maximum current that can be delivered, etc.

While the current spec says that 62.5 kW is possible, that's only if you had a 500V battery pack that could accept the full 125A of current that the station can deliver. We Bolt owners are limited to ~45 kW because we have a battery pack that has a nominal voltage of 360V. 125A times 360V equals 45 kW. In reality, the pack voltage varies from ~324V when almost fully discharged up to 400V when fully charged. You can get a 47 kW charge rate for a little bit because the pack voltage has risen to ~376V and the station is delivering the full 125A of current available. But soon after that the Bolt requests that the current gets dropped because it needs to throttle back the charging rate to avoid frying the battery.
My brain hurts!:eek:
 

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400V 125A specs are the standard for DCFC in Korea and I’ve charged my Bolt EV with them several times. I got 0.92-0.99 min./% during the full speed, 125A charging, so that’s about 32% of battery charged in 30 minutes. Going by the 238 miles per charge numbers, that’s equivalent to about 76 miles. I think 150A charging might just meet the “90 miles in 30 minutes” claim under good conditions.
 
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