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If the Bolt is the charger for th DC quick charge then having I use a EVSE to me makes no sense. Yes all you people that post correcting everyone please let m know why the car couldn't just add 20$ circuitry board to satisfy the level 1&2 charging. Makes absolutely no sense. I work and have work many time with elthe citric forklifts. They all have chargers (at 480v and more). Seems to me it's backwards. No reason for an EVSE. The safety check could be easily made at the car. Yes it have read a ton of all the post about the difference. I understand what your trying to say but really is like asking for a Kleenex when you want a tissue.
Sorry won't let me correct the title. He=the
 

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The EVSE is there for safety, and although it *theoretically* wouldn't be required, it's a good idea. (Circuit breakers on a line aren't *theoretically* required to provide power to an electrical plug either, but it's a really good idea.)

And based on your first sentence, you didn't read enough about the subject. Go find some basic texts online about car charging and read them.
 

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If the Bolt is the charger for th DC quick charge then having I use a EVSE to me makes no sense. Yes all you people that post correcting everyone please let m know why the car couldn't just add 20$ circuitry board to satisfy the level 1&2 charging.
There are a bunch of safety regulations that all electric vehicles must satisfy when connecting to household circuits. The kind of plug is mandated, and the plug needs to be robust enough that you can drive over it without causing damage or a short. The plug also needs to advertise to the car what the maximum permissible current it, and the car needs to signal that it understands that before the plug allows any power to flow.

All of this adds up to the fact that the plug that you stick into the side of the car needs to have a minimal amount of smarts in it. It can't just be a "dumb" extension cord. And so you have the "EVSE", which provides not just a physical connection but meets all of the required safety standards and protocols.
 

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And, BTW, it isn't a $20 circuit board, but maybe a $75 board, because it has to handle current at 240v. Then you put it in a plastic box with some pricey wire, and charge $400 for it.
If you've got a problem with that, just use the 120v one that comes with every electric car, or buy a kit and assemble an L2 yourself. http://www.openevse.com/
 

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If the Bolt is the charger for th DC quick charge then having I use a EVSE to me makes no sense. Yes all you people that post correcting everyone please let m know why the car couldn't just add 20$ circuitry board to satisfy the level 1&2 charging. Makes absolutely no sense. I work and have work many time with elthe citric forklifts. They all have chargers (at 480v and more). Seems to me it's backwards. No reason for an EVSE. The safety check could be easily made at the car. Yes it have read a ton of all the post about the difference. I understand what your trying to say but really is like asking for a Kleenex when you want a tissue.
Sorry won't let me correct the title. He=the
You have things backwards. There is no charger in the car for DC fast charging. The actual charger is in the DC fast charger unit you are hooking up to. It is taking the 480VAC power feed that it is connected to and converting it into 350 to 400 volts DC to directly charge the Bolts battery. Level 1 (120V) and Level 2 (240V) EVSEs provide AC power to the car's internal charger which then converts it to DC power to charge the battery.

The EVSE is there to make sure that power flows only when it is safe to do so. Plugging in a live cord, especially a 240V one, all the time to a car is a good way to get potentially electrocuted or create arcing at the contact points, which over time will result in reduced charging effectiveness and a possible fire due to built-up resistance from the arcing. Yes, the EVSE is a fancy ass expensive portable circuit breaker and anti-shock device.

There's also the fact that there's no good way to know how much current the car can safely draw off of the circuit it's plugged into unless there's some sort of communication system. Typical household circuits can vary widely from 15A up to 50A. The EVSE provides that necessary information to the car.
 

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I also assume your home and auto insurance carrier would demand it.....no EVSE? No payout for an incident. I know mine (State farm) cared and I had to use a licensed electrician to install the 240V line.

Dayle
 

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Always did wonder what a power surge would do to an electric car if it's just plugged into a socket without an EVSE. Last time that happened it shorted out my electric toothbrush.
 

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Always did wonder what a power surge would do to an electric car if it's just plugged into a socket without an EVSE. Last time that happened it shorted out my electric toothbrush.
To my knowledge there is nothing in an EVSE that would stop a power surge from reaching your car. Well, there may be fuses in an EVSE, but I may hope you have those in your main power panel also ....
 
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