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2 months ago brought my Bolt home with full charge of 240 miles showing, then 220 a month later 190' now system kicks off at 158. I unplug and plug in again, maybe 160. I use 220 v Juicebox , what am I doing wrong? Leave charger on overnight and green light comes on steady. Thanks all.
 

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You're mistaking miles of estimated range for charge level. As the weather gets colder, a 100% full charge will produce fewer and fewer miles of estimated range, and that's what the computer is estimating.
 

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I have the same experience here. I use hilltop mode and I usually see right around 200 miles. Now it shows me at 170. What the heck??!! I didn't drive that badly last time, right? Basically what's happened in the words of Sir Davos from Game of Thrones- "Winter is comin' Dave Snow..." :laugh:

The temperatures have dropped and California "winter" is upon us. The car is calculating for poorer range because of this. The way you can be assured the charging equipment is working correctly is, the green bar battery gauge on the left still goes up to where it always does. It's just the estimated range that has changed and I assume it's based on actual recorded outside temperatures and not assumptions based on a calendar date. We shall see as this will be my first "winter" with the Bolt.
 

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Thanks. So when spring comes back I'll get my miles back? Makes sense.
Mostly, yes. The computer is doing it's estimate based on your last few hundred(?) miles of driving. If you suddenly start doing lots of more efficient drives, like slow-speed errands with the climate system off, the range will go up. If you start doing long-distance fast highway trips with the heat turned way up, the range will go down.

As a side note, check your tire pressure, that drops too as it gets colder, and can have a significant impact on efficiency. 38 is 'recommended', but I like to keep mine closer to 41.
 

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The Bolt suffers big decreases from its aerodynamics. The drag coefficient is 0.32, which really starts to hamper the mileage you get at speeds over 55 mph, high wind speeds, and also higher air density. When air is cooler it is more dense. So during the winter months the Bolt has to move more air and become much less efficient. It is a HUGE difference.

Here is my example. During the summer I averaged about 4.1 miles per kWh using air conditioning and driving 65 to 75 mph for 95% of my 130 mile commute. Yesterday I averaged 3.5 miles per kWh without running the heater, I did warm my seat and steering wheel for 20 miles of the drive, for the same commute. It wasn't that cold, maybe high 40's to low 50's. The wind wasn't that bad either. Higher air density has a huge impact on the Bolt.
 

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The Bolt suffers big decreases from its aerodynamics. The drag coefficient is 0.32, which really starts to hamper the mileage you get at speeds over 55 mph, high wind speeds, and also higher air density. When air is cooler it is more dense. So during the winter months the Bolt has to move more air and become much less efficient. It is a HUGE difference.

Here is my example. During the summer I averaged about 4.1 miles per kWh using air conditioning and driving 65 to 75 mph for 95% of my 130 mile commute. Yesterday I averaged 3.5 miles per kWh without running the heater, I did warm my seat and steering wheel for 20 miles of the drive, for the same commute. It wasn't that cold, maybe high 40's to low 50's. The wind wasn't that bad either. Higher air density has a huge impact on the Bolt.
Higher air density has exactly the same effect on the Bolt that it has on every other car. For example; if you double the air density, you double the aerodynamic drag. Air is 12.8% more dense at 32F than it is at 95F, so the aero drag goes up by 12.8%. If aero drag is 90% of the overall drag on a Bolt, at 75 mph, and only 89% of the overall drag on a Model 3, then you would see a 1.1% greater effect on the Bolt.
 

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The Bolt suffers big decreases from its aerodynamics. The drag coefficient is 0.32, which really starts to hamper the mileage you get at speeds over 55 mph, high wind speeds, and also higher air density. When air is cooler it is more dense. So during the winter months the Bolt has to move more air and become much less efficient. It is a HUGE difference.

Here is my example. During the summer I averaged about 4.1 miles per kWh using air conditioning and driving 65 to 75 mph for 95% of my 130 mile commute. Yesterday I averaged 3.5 miles per kWh without running the heater, I did warm my seat and steering wheel for 20 miles of the drive, for the same commute. It wasn't that cold, maybe high 40's to low 50's. The wind wasn't that bad either. Higher air density has a huge impact on the Bolt.
drag co-efficient establish the base mathematical factor from which all drag is calculated vs. velocity - most aero-dynamic drag as a velocity-squared component which quickly overwhelms even the lowest drag co-efficients - all cars suffer from massive aero-drag factors once you get over 40-50 mph…regardless of the drag co-efficient you can't beat the velocity-squared into submission and range starts to drop as the battery has high consumption demands placed on it to overcome the ever increasing drag factor.
 

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Higher air density has exactly the same effect on the Bolt that it has on every other car. For example; if you double the air density, you double the aerodynamic drag.
The Bolt isn't horrible with drag coefficient, but it will suffer more than a Prius and Volt. The drag coefficient IMO should be better for the Bolt without having to pull in air from the grill.
 

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drag co-efficient establish the base mathematical factor from which all drag is calculated vs. velocity - most aero-dynamic drag as a velocity-squared component which quickly overwhelms even the lowest drag co-efficients - all cars suffer from massive aero-drag factors once you get over 40-50 mph…regardless of the drag co-efficient you can't beat the velocity-squared into submission and range starts to drop as the battery has high consumption demands placed on it to overcome the ever increasing drag factor.
I seem to remember from internal combustion engine class in college that the professor said it takes horsepower to the velocity cubed to overcome the drag. think velocity squared is bad when velocity cubed is exponentially worse. thinking this is why they limit the speed on the bolt as the current draw will cause too much heat in the battery that the cooling system can't keep up with. captain, the dilithium crystals can't take any more power.
 

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+1 XJ12 that's true also - speed kills range - that's a simple fact - the most effective thing you can do to increase your range with an EV is drive slower - it by far will have the greatest impact.
 

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I'm having the exact same problem as my car was charging at 235 or so at fully charged now the most I get is 145. I've had the car for about a month and only put about 700 miles on it. You guys can do all the math you like and make all the excuses for weather but my wife also has a Chevy bolt and hers charges to 200 plus. We live in Chicago it got cold I understand there be a degrade in charging but as I said my wife's charges to 200 plus mine only to 145. So explain that one to me. They're both the same year 2019.
 

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I'm coming up on year 3 of Bolt ownership. Every fall my range goes down, every spring it comes back up. Between the air density thing, the heater, and just the battery not being as happy at lower temperatures, all this makes sense. My Spark EV also did this. The good news is, that 3 years and 40K in, I see no permanent battery degradation. Others with 3X this mileage report the same. My honest opinion is that, overall, the cabin heater is responsible for the largest range hit. Try getting by with heated seats and steering wheel and see how your numbers do for a week or so. Not saying it will be fun, but it's a test. I promise it will help.
 

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switch cars and see what happens
I am pretty sure that the result would then be that his wife complains about low full range. ;)
 

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I'm coming up on year 3 of Bolt ownership. Every fall my range goes down, every spring it comes back up. Between the air density thing, the heater, and just the battery not being as happy at lower temperatures, all this makes sense. My Spark EV also did this. The good news is, that 3 years and 40K in, I see no permanent battery degradation. Others with 3X this mileage report the same. My honest opinion is that, overall, the cabin heater is responsible for the largest range hit. Try getting by with heated seats and steering wheel and see how your numbers do for a week or so. Not saying it will be fun, but it's a test. I promise it will help.
I would but without heat on I'm going to have a hard time seeing through steamed up windows. I live in Chicago, we get down to zero and below in winter. I can try it when 25-30 or above.
 

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heavy right foot from a stop will significantly affect range. But it’s certainty more enjoyable.
 
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