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As the manual states: ".. if the vehicle does get a flat tire, there is no spare tire, tire changing equipment, or place to store a tire. Contact Roadside Assistance for help.", are there aftermarket options for a spare tire kit ? like a donut space saver ?
 

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Sure would be nice to have a small temporary use spare tire option for times when you may be traveling in an area that may not have good cellular signal. Just ask Ladogboy!
 

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As the manual states: ".. if the vehicle does get a flat tire, there is no spare tire, tire changing equipment, or place to store a tire. Contact Roadside Assistance for help.", are there aftermarket options for a spare tire kit ? like a donut space saver ?
I doubt there will be. There is no good place for a spare and the jacking equipment. Of course you can probably buy and carry all that stuff around if it's really that important to you.

I've been driving the last 10 and half years in a car that came from the factory with no spare. That car came with some sort of emergency inflator kit. It has some sort of goop that gets sprayed into the tire and then there is an electric battery operated air pump to air the tire up again. I can't tell you how well it works because I've never used it.

The Bolt comes with self sealing tires, so they already have the goop in them. I think we'll be fine.
 

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Sure would be nice to have a small temporary use spare tire option for times when you may be traveling in an area that may not have good cellular signal. Just ask Ladogboy!
Once we know what all wheel specs are, I bet you can buy a donut spare and of course jacks and wrenches are easy to come by. Assembling a kit to carry with you would be pretty easy.
 

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With TPMS, knowing that there is a slow leak prevents most flat tires. I haven't had a true flat in over a decade. I have had leaks and just get them fixed. Carry a can of flat fixer and your should be fine for 98% of situations.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
ref:

Wheels: 17in x 6.5J offset 44, cast aluminum
Tires: Michelin Energy Saver A/S 215/50R17 all-season
 

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I really cannot see the value in having a tire inflator kit for these self sealing tires. Only time might help were if there was a small puncture in the side wall, and that has to be a very rare problem. Larger problem like Ladogboy had would not have been fixed by goo and inflator kit. So I am fairly confident driving around on these tires, going "naked" except in that situation where you may be going on a trip where cellphone signal is spotty, as OnStar also relies on cellular signal...not satellite. A small donut tire, tire tool, and jack would make all the difference here. Would save HOURS if not days. Took Ladogboy more than a day with his situation.

And these OEM tires are currently back-ordered on Tirerack. Not so easy to come by. We do know the specs, just waiting for someone to create and market a usable donut tire to throw in the garage and put in the storage area for those mission critical trips.
 

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I really cannot see the value in having a tire inflator kit for these self sealing tires. Only time might help were if there was a small puncture in the side wall, and that has to be a very rare problem. Larger problem like Ladogboy had would not have been fixed by goo and inflator kit. So I am fairly confident driving around on these tires, going "naked" except in that situation where you may be going on a trip where cellphone signal is spotty, as OnStar also relies on cellular signal...not satellite. A small donut tire, tire tool, and jack would make all the difference here. Would save HOURS if not days. Took Ladogboy more than a day with his situation.

And these OEM tires are currently back-ordered on Tirerack. Not so easy to come by. We do know the specs, just waiting for someone to create and market a usable donut tire to throw in the garage and put in the storage area for those mission critical trips.
yep, pretty much, from some research, might be able to adapt from this volt spare guide:
http://www.electricvehiclewiki.com/Build_your_own_spare_tire_kit_with_quality_Chevrolet_OEM_Parts_for_around_$150

also, i found that costco has the oem spec tires handy, and if order online, ranges from set for $399 to $699 for Michellin Energy Saver A/S
 

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It all depends on how you treat your tires, especially how you drive and maintain the correct pressure. Lower pressures allow the sidewalls to flex more and weaken them.

I have a 2009 Chevy Equinox, and only once I need to stop and replace the bad tire with the spare because I ran near a concrete border that cut the sidewall. But other than that, no leaks or flats on normal roads. My previous car was a 1995 Buick Regal, and in 21 years it only had one flat. I used a "Fix-a-Flat" inflator can to fill it up and the next day had the tire puncture repaired. I NEVER used the spare in the trunk!

The newer cars that have the special inflator work on that plan: pump air if the pressure is low, and use a sealer to fill and reinflate from a puncture. So they never need the spare. Having the inflator kit is much more useful, and weighs less, than a spare and a jack. And if you can't get an inflator kit, get a inflator can and store it in the rear (I keep one in my Equinox).
 

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I really cannot see the value in having a tire inflator kit for these self sealing tires. Only time might help were if there was a small puncture in the side wall, and that has to be a very rare problem. Larger problem like Ladogboy had would not have been fixed by goo and inflator kit. So I am fairly confident driving around on these tires, going "naked" except in that situation where you may be going on a trip where cellphone signal is spotty, as OnStar also relies on cellular signal...not satellite. A small donut tire, tire tool, and jack would make all the difference here. Would save HOURS if not days. Took Ladogboy more than a day with his situation.

And these OEM tires are currently back-ordered on Tirerack. Not so easy to come by. We do know the specs, just waiting for someone to create and market a usable donut tire to throw in the garage and put in the storage area for those mission critical trips.
Yes, but the O.E. tires are stupidly expensive and deliver lousy performance except for energy savings. Because my commute is an epic mountain road, I have run stickier tires on my Spark EV for the last two years. They cost 25% less, lasted 50% longer, delivered much better traction for acceleration (the Spark spins the tires all the time off the line), cornering, and braking and only gave up about 5% range. I'll probably do the same on the Bolt.
 

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Yes, but the O.E. tires are stupidly expensive and deliver lousy performance except for energy savings. Because my commute is an epic mountain road, I have run stickier tires on my Spark EV for the last two years. They cost 25% less, lasted 50% longer, delivered much better traction for acceleration (the Spark spins the tires all the time off the line), cornering, and braking and only gave up about 5% range. I'll probably do the same on the Bolt.
5% fuel efficiency sounds like a small price to pay for all those benefits. Plus maybe better ride quality and less road noise?
 

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It all depends on how you treat your tires, especially how you drive and maintain the correct pressure. Lower pressures allow the sidewalls to flex more and weaken them.

I have a 2009 Chevy Equinox, and only once I need to stop and replace the bad tire with the spare because I ran near a concrete border that cut the sidewall. But other than that, no leaks or flats on normal roads. My previous car was a 1995 Buick Regal, and in 21 years it only had one flat. I used a "Fix-a-Flat" inflator can to fill it up and the next day had the tire puncture repaired. I NEVER used the spare in the trunk!

The newer cars that have the special inflator work on that plan: pump air if the pressure is low, and use a sealer to fill and reinflate from a puncture. So they never need the spare. Having the inflator kit is much more useful, and weighs less, than a spare and a jack. And if you can't get an inflator kit, get a inflator can and store it in the rear (I keep one in my Equinox).
The fixaflat can sounds like a good idea. But is even that necessary with the Bolt's self-sealing tires? Doesn't the OEM Bolt tire already basically do what fixaflat does?
 

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yep, pretty much, from some research, might be able to adapt from this volt spare guide:
http://www.electricvehiclewiki.com/Build_your_own_spare_tire_kit_with_quality_Chevrolet_OEM_Parts_for_around_$150

also, i found that costco has the oem spec tires handy, and if order online, ranges from set for $399 to $699 for Michellin Energy Saver A/S
Costco is also giving $70 off a set of 4 Michelins, as they often do. But the $399 BFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/S are still cheaper and seem to get better customer reviews.
 

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The fixaflat can sounds like a good idea. But is even that necessary with the Bolt's self-sealing tires? Doesn't the OEM Bolt tire already basically do what fixaflat does?
They don't self inflate, they just have a resin layer on the inside to help guard against sharp intrusions. It can definitely blow out a sidewall or get a flat any number of other ways.

Attached is a pic of the inside of the Bolt tires. Essentially it looks like they've taken a standard no season and slopped a layer of tar on the inside. The Michelins are 3#heavier (likely as a result of this sticky resin) than my Nokian snow tires of the same size. To me, the additional unsprung weight to be moved isn't worth it, unless you are unlike most Bolt drivers and want to drive out to the middle of nowhere or take long distance trips away from humanity. Easier to outsource to AAA and maybe keep another tire at home.

I'd rather carry a can of fix-a-flat than deal with shi$%y no season LRRs. I'll have the Nokians in the winter and a summer tire. As always, just my .02.
 

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They don't self inflate, they just have a resin layer on the inside to help guard against sharp intrusions. It can definitely blow out a sidewall or get a flat any number of other ways.
Sure, but with a blown out sidewall or other major damage beyond the ability of the tires to seal, the fixaflat is not going to seal it either, right? With smaller, sealable damage, you don't need the fixaflat to reinflate, since the tires won't deflate in the first place. So, fixaflat adds little or nothing to the OEM selfsealing tires. Am I missing something?

I'm thinking your approach is best - good summer tires (we don't really have winter in Southern California) and carry a can of fixaflat.
 

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I should drive around and pick up everybody's discarded OEM tires. I'd probably never have to buy tires again!! :laugh:
Mine are already sitting in the basement!

You should come visit Oregon, we'll bolt down some mountain roads, but some of us will be able to go faster than others! Haha...
 
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