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Does anyone know the charging power of the new 40 kWh Nissan Leaf? In one of the articles below it says it can charge to 80% in 40 minutes. It has a 151 miles range, so 80% is 120 miles. If you start charging at say 30 miles, then we are talking about 90 miles in 40 minutes or about 68 miles in 30 minutes. This is about the same as the Bolt with current CCS chargers available (72 miles in 30 minutes with a 50kW EVgo charger). Does anyone know more precise numbers?
 

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Wow! The resident was actually pushed out of the lead world news this am... for about five minutes.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/nissans-carlos-ghosn-arrested-to-be-ousted-as-chairman-amid-misconduct-probe-1542634696

I wonder what this means for the 2019 Leaf, if anything? Ghosn was supposedly the push behind electrification at Nissan.
I doubt it will have much impact. If anything, it might result in even more rapid improvements on the LEAF. Ghosn was instrumental in the initial push toward EVs, but he was also instrumental in keeping the LEAF cheap.

Does anyone know the charging power of the new 40 kWh Nissan Leaf? In one of the articles below it says it can charge to 80% in 40 minutes. It has a 151 miles range, so 80% is 120 miles. If you start charging at say 30 miles, then we are talking about 90 miles in 40 minutes or about 68 miles in 30 minutes. This is about the same as the Bolt with current CCS chargers available (72 miles in 30 minutes with a 50kW EVgo charger). Does anyone know more precise numbers?
One of Nissan's advertisements lists the LEAF as being able to add "90 miles in 30 minutes" on DC fast charging, so on 125 A DC fast chargers (under ideal conditions), the LEAF's charging speeds should be very similar to the Bolt EV's.

The problem is, because the LEAF lacks active thermal battery management, it will step down the charge rate quite drastically. I've personally witnessed 40 kWh LEAFs charging at 12 kW to 18 kW on chargers where my Bolt EV was seeing peak charging rates of 46 kW.
 

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One of Nissan's advertisements lists the LEAF as being able to add "90 miles in 30 minutes" on DC fast charging, so on 125 A DC fast chargers (under ideal conditions), the LEAF's charging speeds should be very similar to the Bolt EV's. The problem is, because the LEAF lacks active thermal battery management, it will step down the charge rate quite drastically.
I am looking forward to the day when I see 90 miles in 30 minutes with my Bolt EV. I have yet to find a charger to do it.
 

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I am looking forward to the day when I see 90 miles in 30 minutes with my Bolt EV. I have yet to find a charger to do it.
If you are going by EPA miles, the 125 A DC fast chargers should do it, but it seems like many of the DCFC on the east coast are 100 A, for whatever reason. Of course, the requirement is that you have start the charge somewhere around 20% battery. For me, 125 A DCFC (in the Bolt EV's fastest charge window) consistently provide ~22.5 kWh in 30 minutes. At 4 mi/kWh, that's 90 miles. Of course, you have charger losses, and your efficiency may vary.

For the Bolt EV, I feel that 3.5 mi/kWh is probably the most accurate baseline for freeway efficiency, so in real-world freeway travel situations, you're likely to only see about 70 to 80 miles of range added per 30 minutes on a 125 A DC fast charger.

On the 150+ A DC fast chargers, you should exceed 90 miles in 30 minutes under most circumstances, even if your session bleeds over significantly into the 105 A step down. By EPA standards, you should be getting close to 105 to 110 miles in 30 minutes. Under a more realistic freeway efficiency of 3.5 mi/kWh, you should see just over 90 miles.
 

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If you are going by EPA miles, the 125 A DC fast chargers should do it, but it seems like many of the DCFC on the east coast are 100 A, for whatever reason. Of course, the requirement is that you have start the charge somewhere around 20% battery. For me, 125 A DCFC (in the Bolt EV's fastest charge window) consistently provide ~22.5 kWh in 30 minutes. At 4 mi/kWh, that's 90 miles. Of course, you have charger losses, and your efficiency may vary.
I am not sure what EPA miles are... However, yes, its the chargers that are the problem in the east...as I intimated below.
 

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I am not sure what EPA miles are... However, yes, its the chargers that are the problem in the east...as I intimated below.
EPA efficiency for the Bolt EV is rated at just under 4 mi/kWh. If you are coming up with a generic estimate for how many miles of range you would gain from a charging session, that is probably the number that you'd reference. However, that number is a bit inflated compared to the Bolt EV's typical freeway efficiency.
 

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EPA efficiency for the Bolt EV is rated at just under 4 mi/kWh. If you are coming up with a generic estimate for how many miles of range you would gain from a charging session, that is probably the number that you'd reference. However, that number is a bit inflated compared to the Bolt EV's typical freeway efficiency.
I am not clear, @NewsCoulomb, what you mean by "generic estimate". My lifetime efficiency, according to the car's readout behind the steering wheel is 4.1 m/kWh (generic?). My own data collection from daily readouts of the kWh and miles from the middle screen, over the last 10k miles, one winter and one summer, give me an average of 3.84 mi/kWh, with a median of 3.93 m/kWh. Taking readouts from my ChargePoint level 2 charger, which takes into account charging loss, the efficiency drops to 3.5 and 3.65 m/kWh respectively. For one recent summer ~600 mile trip of highway driving, my middle screen efficiency was 4.1 mi/kWh for the whole trip. My "freeway" efficiency is generally 4.1 and higher than my everyday efficiency. I typically drive at 67-74 mph on the highway, sorry "freeway". Around our rural roads I drive at about 50-55 mph, with only a few lights. I do not do city driving. The "generic?" number I give above does not agree with my actual data collection, so I am not sure how the car (GM) comes up with that number on the dash - its the number you get when you access the screens that give you tire pressure etc. My other numbers were taken from the actual charging screen that give you the numbers "since the last charge".
 

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Tesla Model 3 to get CCS Combo 2 plug in Europe

According to this link:
https://chargedevs.com/newswire/tesla-model-3-to-get-ccs-combo-2-plug-in-europe/
and I quote:
"Can this be true? Is Tesla, which prides itself on doing things its own way, going to adopt the same DC fast charging plug used by ordinary EVs? Yep. The company has confirmed (via Electrek) that Model 3 vehicles sold in the European market will come with a CCS Combo 2 charge port. An adapter for Models S and X is in the works.
Fast charging stations are cropping up all over Europe. Ionity, a joint venture of several automakers, aims to install some 400 highway charging stations all over Europe by 2020. Of course, Tesla drivers can use such third-party networks in addition to Tesla’s own Supercharger network, but at the moment this requires an expensive CHAdeMO adapter, which has some drawbacks and isn’t yet compatible with Model 3."
 

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From Engadget.com:

"... Just a few days ago, it announced that Model 3 vehicles for Europe will come with with a Combined Charging System (CCS) port more commonly used by automakers in the region. It will also retrofit its Superchargers in the continent with CCS plugs that other brands could eventually use if the company ever decides to open up its network..."

Even though this is for Europe, it signals a shift in Tesla's strategy/game plan for its Supercharger network. We can only hope that future plans involve a similar Tesla/CCS arrangement at current Tesla locations in the US.

A link to the full article:

https://www.engadget.com/2018/11/20/tesla-supercharger-v3-2019/
 

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I am not clear, @NewsCoulomb , what you mean by "generic estimate".
You asked him what "EPA Miles" are. They are miles you can drive assuming that your driving style and conditions match those which produced the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) official range estimate. Everyone drives differently, so using a "generic"measure such as the EPA range gives everyone a common point of comparison. If you find that you consistently outperform or underperform the EPA's estimates then you can adjust your expectations accordingly.
 
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