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Your dealer is a crook! I drive in L Mode always. I have since day one. That was in Jan 2017.
My car has 40K and I have ZERO issue's. The dealers trying to make a quick profit for doing NOTHING!

I've been a GM Service technician since 1975 and I am also Bolt certified.
What they are claiming is total BS! Keep you money and find another dealer.
 

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Hi,

I just returned from the dealership and they suggested that I have my brakes serviced. They said that I have not been using them enough (I've been driving in L) and something is drying up and they will fail eventually...sorry I am not car technical. They quoted me $210.00 CND for front and back repair.

I have read other posts about people being told they need their brakes serviced too. Opinions?

Thanks
I'm very glad you asked here before letting the dealer charge you. But I'm also disgusted that dealers still try to pull off stunts like this. No matter how they spin it, this is fraud.
( Lol or maybe not. Just read the posts by @Entropy512 )
 

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Your dealer is a crook! I drive in L Mode always. I have since day one. That was in Jan 2017.
My car has 40K and I have ZERO issue's. The dealers trying to make a quick profit for doing NOTHING!

I've been a GM Service technician since 1975 and I am also Bolt certified.
What they are claiming is total BS! Keep you money and find another dealer.
Um, your profile says that live in Monterey, California. A place where the average temperature in December is 43F and the record low is 20. Your experiences are irrelevant in this case.

In that 40k, how many times have you driven on roads that were recently salted due to snowfall?

You've been a GM service tech since 1975 - how much of that was in parts of the country that get snowfall and hence road salt?
 

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The OP’s Bolt is six months old, there’s simply no way that he has corroded caliper pins. This might be something to check in a couple of years, but it’s just a waste of money on a nearly new Bolt.
 

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From the parts diagram it looks like the caliper pins can be pulled out one at a time, dressed with some anti-seize and replaced easily. Probably 1/2 hour job. Do it every other tire rotation.
My guess is that they are dry from the factory.
 

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Um, your profile says that live in Monterey, California. A place where the average temperature in December is 43F and the record low is 20. Your experiences are irrelevant in this case.

In that 40k, how many times have you driven on roads that were recently salted due to snowfall?

You've been a GM service tech since 1975 - how much of that was in parts of the country that get snowfall and hence road salt?

You're way over thinking a simple thing on a new car. Your automotive inexperience is showing.
 

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From the parts diagram it looks like the caliper pins can be pulled out one at a time, dressed with some anti-seize and replaced easily. Probably 1/2 hour job. Do it every other tire rotation.
My guess is that they are dry from the factory.
The caliper pins are sealed. You too are way over thinking a simple system.
You won't need to service a caliper pin before the brakes are worn. Trust me,
they didn't remove anything beyond a wheel when they rotated the tires.

Dealers pray on people that don't know anything about vehicles. Don't be that guy!


Never use Anti-Seize on caliper pins.
 

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Every single car I have owned that employed disc brakes utilized dual calliper pins.
However, they are not out in the elements, as are the actual calliper. They are enclosed in a rubber boot, much like those on a CV joint, only much smaller. Driving hundreds of thousands of km on winter salted roads, I have only once experienced what is known as a “seized calliper”, where the calliper doesn’t easily allow the pads to release, causing premature wear.
A cursory look seems the Bolt uses the same very common system, & in my experience requires little service.
If you read the service schedules, they do recommend “brake service” every 20K-30K km. They are supposed to pull inspect the calliper for free movement, & lube the pins if required. In practice I have never done this until the actual pads need replacing, & have only once had one stick.
if you do decide to inspect/lube them, READ & FOLLOW PROPER PROCEDURE.
its not difficult, but don’t use anti seize. Brakes can experience high heat, & use product developed for such. For the pins, use a synthetic grease made for this purpose. It won’t washout or swell rubber.
A little goes a long ways, I’ve had this tube for 10 years, & will never use it all.
The other critical point is using to much. The pins are a very close fit, much like a piston. If you read brake service instructions, they caution about getting lube down at the end of the pin, which causes a hydraulic lock, rendering you brakes impotent.
 

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Thanks for the tip on no anti seize however I might add I've been using it for 30 years on my motorcycles with no ill effects however the pins are open to the air with no rubber boots. The trick is just a very light coat with no slop.
 

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The OP’s Bolt is six months old, there’s simply no way that he has corroded caliper pins. This might be something to check in a couple of years, but it’s just a waste of money on a nearly new Bolt.
If GM isn't greasing the pins from the factory (Tesla apparently isn't), then this would fall into the category of preventative maintenance.

It would be useful to know exactly what the dealer intends to do and what their rationale is. If they say it's preventative maintenance, I'd agree with them, given that a company who specializes in electric vehicles and has a vested interest in getting people out of their service centers because they're backlogged to the point of damaging their reputation has THIS as one of their only remaining routine/preventative maintenance items, and definitely their most frequent one. (In fact, I believe the brake service is something they added to the schedule recently that wasn't there.)
 

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Thanks for the tip on no anti seize however I might add I've been using it for 30 years on my motorcycles with no ill effects however the pins are open to the air with no rubber boots. The trick is just a very light coat with no slop.

LOL! All my motorcycles have a floating disc with fixed calipers.
 

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If GM isn't greasing the pins from the factory (Tesla apparently isn't), then this would fall into the category of preventative maintenance.

It would be useful to know exactly what the dealer intends to do and what their rationale is. If they say it's preventative maintenance, I'd agree with them, given that a company who specializes in electric vehicles and has a vested interest in getting people out of their service centers because they're backlogged to the point of damaging their reputation has THIS as one of their only remaining routine/preventative maintenance items, and definitely their most frequent one. (In fact, I believe the brake service is something they added to the schedule recently that wasn't there.)
GM lubes the pins on all their brake calipers during assembly. It's no different than an ICE system.
Just because the car is a BEV, makes ZERO difference to the caliper design or use of lubricant.
All have a sealed boot design and all use lubricant.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, regen doesn't function in reverse.

Like with old school hydraulic drum brakes, it might be necessary to periodically get your Bolt up to speed in reverse and pump the brakes. (With drum brakes, this engaged the automatic adjustment function.)
 

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Or press both brake and accelerator while going backwards...
 

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I'm not sure why you would suggest something like this on a non drum car ??
It's not going to magically lubricate the pin. Caliper movement is very minimal.

With a sealed pin there is no need to over think things. It's not going to do anything
by monkeying with it. Drive it! Maybe in 3 years you could pull it apart to clean the
pins, bores and brake plates to keep things serviced. No need to on a 6 month old car.

Like I said! Mine is 3 years old and works just fine. Even in salt conditions, the pins will not
be an issue because they are sealed.
I would be more concerned about the brake pad plates getting rusty before anything else.... YMMV!


If I'm not mistaken, regen doesn't function in reverse.

Like with old school hydraulic drum brakes, it might be necessary to periodically get your Bolt up to speed in reverse and pump the brakes. (With drum brakes, this engaged the automatic adjustment function.)
Or press both brake and accelerator while going backwards...
If want to activate the hydraulic friction brakes, just brake hard enough
to overcome the regen braking. It's not rocket science.

I do this a lot during my commute because of the salt-air from living by the ocean.
It keeps my rotors clean and rust free!
 

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IDK if any of you guy realize this or not! Most Domestic vehicles come from, Detroit.
Or are at least designed there. Detroit MI. has one of the largest salt mines in the nation. They have been using salt for decades. These cars are designed to resist all types of corrosion. That's why the body is dipped at the factory. All the retaining bolts, including the brake rotors have been zinc plated.

It's used everywhere.

No car ever made required caliper service @ every oil change. That's just crazy!

While my wheel was off, I removed the caliper to show you how it's designed and
why it's just crazy to overthink such a simple system.

Here's the caliper bolts. The caliper mounting ears and the caliper pins.
Note the boot is 100% sealed to keep out the elements. The pin lube is
still present on the pin and the pin slides like the day it was put together at the factory.

And to answer, Entropy512's irrelevant question. I lived in, Detroit for 20 years.
My 1969 Chevy Nova SS had front disc brakes that were nowhere near as well
sealed from the elements as the, Bolt's system. I never had a problem with them.

Although, the front brake pads were replaced about every 3 years. The winters are
long and cold in, Detroit. They even used salt on the side streets to keep the ice clear.

As stated before! The brake pads backing plate will rust before anything.
The pad hardware is stainless steel. We always add lube to the hardware too.
 

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