Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Found a couple range calculators on Chevy's website. If you don't already have an idea of what the Bolt's range will take you along your regular route, then this tool is for you.

Feel free to report your calculations and trips below:

CLICK on the images to go to calculator

Calculator #1


Calculator #2

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Pretty cool that it's from Chevys website directly so they can collect and use that information to see what real world testing gets.
 

·
Registered
2017 Bolt EV / 2014 Spark EV / 2020 Tesla Model Y
Joined
·
135 Posts
A good idea, but there should be a way to change the cost of electricity and gas. My cost for electricity is about 1/2 their assumption...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
It may not take into consideration traffic and cabin temperature, but it'll give me a general idea if I'll make it or not. Looks like I can make 6 round trips to work on one charge, but since it's winter I'll probably reduce that to around 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It may not take into consideration traffic and cabin temperature, but it'll give me a general idea if I'll make it or not. Looks like I can make 6 round trips to work on one charge, but since it's winter I'll probably reduce that to around 4.
That's the way I was looking at it, yes these calculators won't factor in the minutia but it surely will give a baseline, somewhere to start to set our expectations. Overall its a range, of course due to that minutia and other influential factors.

What i'm REALLY interested in is what real owners will be reporting with as much or little detail as they wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
That's the way I was looking at it, yes these calculators won't factor in the minutia but it surely will give a baseline, somewhere to start to set our expectations. Overall its a range, of course due to that minutia and other influential factors.

What i'm REALLY interested in is what real owners will be reporting with as much or little detail as they wish.
The meter is total nonsense. All it's doing is int(238 / (route_distance * 2)) for the # of round trips and then 238 % (route_distance * 2) to get remaining miles. It's complete ****. You'd think they could at least take into account elevation changes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Rules for long distance driving

I agree with the comments above. There are so many variables that determine the range, that it would take a much more complex calculator to come up with any sort of decent estimate. My experience with long-distance driving was guided by Tony Williams' rules at the website I cite below, but in summary and with some experiential license:

Use the 238 mile as a starting estimate of range
Leave a margin of 30-60 miles at each charging stop
The first drive of the day will be upwards of 180-200 miles as you start with a full overnight level 2 charge
You will recharge to 80% at the first stop, which will take you to 190 miles of range ( you can charge less if you wish)
Then you have 130 miles to the next charge, and so on.
Use these assumptions in Plugshare software to find charging stations that meet these distances
Find a back up station within that 30-60 miles margin at each stop, just in case you have a problem at the charger.
Plug the charging stations into a maps app, such as Google maps, set up the route, and drive
The more charging stations there are on your route, the smaller the margin you can leave between charges
Up to about 75 mph, it makes little difference how you drive on the route, because the margin should take care of that.
Charging for only 30 minutes will not hurt you time-wise, because you will just have to stop more often, not more time (except for finding the station)

I have found that 72-90 miles between charges works out for me. Some might be impatient with that. Winter is going to change this by 25% unless you wear your woolies.

Driving slowly might save you energy, but it will take you longer to cover the distance. Driving faster will mean you use more kWh, and have to charge longer, but you arrived faster. So it makes no difference. Williams shows some graphs to illustrate this.

Winter will change your range from 238 miles to something less. I suspect about 25% less or 180 miles. So, you will be charging more often.

This is the Williams' article:

https://insideevs.com/planning-a-long-journey-with-your-chevrolet-bolt-ev-or-opel-ampera-e/
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top