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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
OK, got my first full month power bill. It was nearly double compared to the same month last year. Sep 2020 compared to Sep 2021. This is the best month for a comparison as we do not have the heat on yet, (Electric baseboard) and use no AC at all as it's not hot enough. We use fireplace for cool days and open windows on warmer ones. Anyway we charge the car Every weeknight, Sun-Friday. It's usually at 35-40% SOC and goes to 90%. It costs us $30 a week based on the bill comparison. I can live with that. Much better than the $120-$140 a week in gas. That's 660 miles of commute with another 180 running around after work and Sat/Sun. So 840 miles at a cost $0.065/mile! vs. $0.66/Mile on gas. Liking this electric commute thing.

My maths may be off. $30 a week charging divided by 840 miles would be $0.035/mile and that looks too low. Not sure what I did LOL. I'm averaging 30 KWH more a day so 30*7*4*.1138 = $95.59 *1.15tax = $109.93/Month divided by 3360Miles a month = $0.032/mile. This is all in CAD$ too so it would be $0.024 USD/Mile

Sep 2020 average KWH/Day was 30
Sep 2021 Average KWH/Day was 60

So the car has traveled 4000 KM at an Average 18.2 KWH/100 KM (this is from the trip meter) = 3.4 Mile/KW for the 4000 KM (2400 Miles) that would be 705.8 KWH *.1138 $80.32*1.15 = 92.37 / 2400 miles = $0.038/Mile

The gas is 8L/100 = 320 L for 4000KM @ $1.45L = $464 for the same distance so 4000/464 = .116/KM $0.0696 per mile so double not sure what I did in my first Post LOL.
 

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Our last two bills have been about $35-$40 higher vs. last year. My charging pattern is almost identical to yours, Maritime. Except mine is usually at 50% SOC. It takes roughly 3 hours each weeknight to charge. I was spending about $200-$250 per month in gas. Wish I would have bought an EV sooner....love it!
 

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Just curious if anyone has tested for the amount of battery loss if a Bolt is left (unplugged) and not driven for an extended period? We know an ICE car battery will go dead if left for extended periods.........

Interested to know how much battery juice is lost if Bolt is parked for a month (or any extended time period)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Our last two bills have been about $35-$40 higher vs. last year. My charging pattern is almost identical to yours, Maritime. Except mine is usually at 50% SOC. It takes roughly 3 hours each weeknight to charge. I was spending about $200-$250 per month in gas. Wish I would have bought an EV sooner....love it!
I'm now considering selling the Pilot to buy a cheap used leaf and just borrowing a Vehicle that can tow our camper the 2 times a year we go camping. My commute is 30 miles a day and a leaf can do that 3 times roughly before I need to charge it up. We have a company leaf my boss may sell me as they need more range for what it's now going to be used for so they are planning to get a Bolt/Kona/ID4 to replace it. It has a full set of winter tires on wheels too.
 

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What EVSE do you use? I use a JuiceBox and I get reports from it. I run the numbers every month. This helps me monitor my car costs and subtracting the car usage from the bill helps me track the house usage. (I am maybe geeky about my electric usage.)

I driver 3000 to 3400 miles a month; 500 miles a week is commute and the rest is traveling to see my wife who is 250 miles away in medical school.

I'm spending 0.022 per mile when I only charge at home. It goes up to about 0.03 when I drive to Galveston because I use EA for DCFC. (Our electric rate is very low.)
 

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Just curious if anyone has tested for the amount of battery loss if a Bolt is left (unplugged) and not driven for an extended period? We know an ICE car battery will go dead if left for extended periods.........

Interested to know how much battery juice is lost if Bolt is parked for a month (or any extended time period)
The battery discharge rate of an idle Bolt is incredibly slow. It can sit for months and months without running down to zero. I have seen estimates of somewhere between 1 and 2 years (depending on the outside conditions) for a fully charged Bolt drive battery to run all the way down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What EVSE do you use? I use a JuiceBox and I get reports from it. I run the numbers every month. This helps me monitor my car costs and subtracting the car usage from the bill helps me track the house usage. (I am maybe geeky about my electric usage.)

I driver 3000 to 3400 miles a month; 500 miles a week is commute and the rest is traveling to see my wife who is 250 miles away in medical school.
What EVSE do you use? I use a JuiceBox and I get reports from it. I run the numbers every month. This helps me monitor my car costs and subtracting the car usage from the bill helps me track the house usage. (I am maybe geeky about my electric usage.)

I driver 3000 to 3400 miles a month; 500 miles a week is commute and the rest is traveling to see my wife who is 250 miles away in medical school.
Grizzl-E Smart but I haven't got an app for it yet to get any info off it. I should though.
 

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Grizzl-E Smart but I haven't got an app for it yet to get any info off it. I should though.
Really depends on your hydro cost. Using off-peak power the average cost here is 78 cents per 100 km. That may change as the rates fluctuate summer/winter. And that does not include the new carbon tax. Comparing the total bill year to year, it is down by 15%. But this is likely due to better time management, because of all of the added extra costs. I just like at straight cost per kWh and how many kWh the car draws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Really depends on your hydro cost. Using off-peak power the average cost here is 78 cents per 100 km. That may change as the rates fluctuate summer/winter. And that does not include the new carbon tax. Comparing the total bill year to year, it is down by 15%. But this is likely due to better time management, because of all of the added extra costs. I just like at straight cost per kWh and how many kWh the car draws.
Here we have no time of use price. It's $0.1138/KWH 24/7. It's coming someday.
 

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Here we have no time of use price. It's $0.1138/KWH 24/7. It's coming someday.
Here I can choose a two tier fixed rate system or a three tier time of use rate system. With time of use being the best option, I program the car to only charge at the lowest rate. Your hydro cost is not bad at $0.1138/KWH. A lot of places in the US report scary high electricity rates. And some also have predatory road tax added to registrations for EVs. I feel very fortunate that all the costs here are manageable and considerably lower than driving an ICE. It is a good thing that road maintenance here is paid for out of the general fund and not exclusively from gas tax. I think you really have to add up all of the costs to get the best picture of cost differences. EVs are a big winner here.
 

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That's a heck of a savings! I don't drive nearly as much as you (any more), and it is still a nice savings. Even before I bought the Bolt, I was using older numbers of $0.14/kWh. It turns out we are paying just over $0.11kWh now. Fortunately, I can charge at work for free.. but even if I had to pay for it, the cost would be just $0.07/kWh. My car would be a small blip in the ~$4,000 electric bill there.

Even if I was charging at home all the time, my ~1,000 miles per month would only add about $30 to my electric bill instead of the $120/month it was costing to drive my Abarth. My monthly car payment went down by $130 as well, although I will have that bill for longer. Overall, that's about $200 more in my pocket every month, which will quickly pay for the home and portable EVSEs I bought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here too. No extra fees yet for registering. Have the best per capita charging infrastructure in Canada, not saying a lot with the second smallest population LOL. But I can go north to south and east to west and never have more the 70KM between DCFC's so that's say's something. on my wifes 110 KM commute there is 4 DCFC spaced about 25-30KM apart so if you pull into on and it's in use you can usully get to another without blowing all your range
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's a heck of a savings! I don't drive nearly as much as you (any more), and it is still a nice savings. Even before I bought the Bolt, I was using older numbers of $0.14/kWh. It turns out we are paying just over $0.11kWh now. Fortunately, I can charge at work for free.. but even if I had to pay for it, the cost would be just $0.07/kWh. My car would be a small blip in the ~$4,000 electric bill there.

Even if I was charging at home all the time, my ~1,000 miles per month would only add about $30 to my electric bill instead of the $120/month it was costing to drive my Abarth. My monthly car payment went down by $130 as well, although I will have that bill for longer. Overall, that's about $200 more in my pocket every month, which will quickly pay for the home and portable EVSEs I bought.
Yep, the maths add up. We got 50% of our EVSE install rebated here as well
 

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I put solar in this residence about 10 years ago and was fortunate to get in a rate plan that was very lucrative, now frozen and unavailable. So far this year we have spent abut $700 for electric in total, with three 3ton heat pumps, a swimming pool, a Bolt and a Volt, electric clothes dryer. We should finish the year well under $900, which is amazing in AZ with the AC costs. We do all the conservation stuff, cellular shades for the windows, added attic insulation, LED lighting as the CFLs die, inverter pool pump.

When we did the solar the wife and I both agreed that green was good as long as it made financial sense, which it did in out case, the ROI was only about 3 years for our out of pocket costs.

BTW AZ give a break on registering EVs. Just got a check from the dealer for the break in registration.
 

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The original tires on our 2017 bolt are just about done and I just realized that the per mile cost of new tires is similar to our home electric costs per mile (off peak rate of about $0.08 per kWh).
 

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I'm now considering selling the Pilot to buy a cheap used leaf and just borrowing a Vehicle that can tow our camper the 2 times a year we go camping. My commute is 30 miles a day and a leaf can do that 3 times roughly before I need to charge it up. We have a company leaf my boss may sell me as they need more range for what it's now going to be used for so they are planning to get a Bolt/Kona/ID4 to replace it. It has a full set of winter tires on wheels too.
I would avoid the Leaf because of the short range, which will be much shorter in winter, and the charging port, which is not compatible with standard cables, and which will no longer be used by Nissan or anybody else here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I put solar in this residence about 10 years ago and was fortunate to get in a rate plan that was very lucrative, now frozen and unavailable. So far this year we have spent abut $700 for electric in total, with three 3ton heat pumps, a swimming pool, a Bolt and a Volt, electric clothes dryer. We should finish the year well under $900, which is amazing in AZ with the AC costs. We do all the conservation stuff, cellular shades for the windows, added attic insulation, LED lighting as the CFLs die, inverter pool pump.

When we did the solar the wife and I both agreed that green was good as long as it made financial sense, which it did in out case, the ROI was only about 3 years for our out of pocket costs.

BTW AZ give a break on registering EVs. Just got a check from the dealer for the break in registration.
Nice. I am now looking into solar again, looked into it 2 years ago and it was close to a break even on a 15 year loan to pay for it. I think costs have come down again and if I can break even on 10 year loan I'm going to go for it. I'd rather pay a loan and use the solar than pay electric bills. Our grid is about 70% green but when peak demands hit in the winter they fire up coal and oil generators which I would love to stay idle. We have a mix of nuclear and hydro for the lower demand months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I would avoid the Leaf because of the short range, which will be much shorter in winter, and the charging port, which is not compatible with standard cables, and which will no longer be used by Nissan or anybody else here.
it's a 2017 and J1772 plug car?? I use the charger we have for it the few times I get to take the Bolt to work. anyway it's a moot point as the CCA is still to high on it for me to get a good enough deal for the maths to work out.
 

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So 840 miles at a cost $0.065/mile!
It's $0.1138/KWH 24/7
Hmmmm....perhaps a more accurate way is to keep track of the kWh you use. Based on the data you've given, your miles/kWh is 1.75. Seems low to me. (840 miles x .065 $/mile = $54.60 spent on charging. $54.60/0.1138 $/kWh = 480kWh used. 840 miles/480kWh = 1.75 miles/kWh)
 

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Here we have no time of use price. It's $0.1138/KWH 24/7. It's coming someday.
Plus line fees, connection service fees and taxes? Take your bill, divide the dollars that you pay at the bottom by the kWh used to see the actual price you are averaging.
 
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