Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
21 - 40 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
I also wonder if upgrading the software moves me back in the battery replacement queue...Any thoughts? Anyone have any details from a GM service tech or something?
Good question. For that to be a question, however, you'd have to assume GM is competent enough and cares enough to modify your recall schedule based on another procedure that was done. Given that some people still get recall notices months after a buyback, I'm giving that low odds. It's not likely the "battery replacement department" would even know what the "software installation department" is doing... much less care.

Mike
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
3,684 Posts
I agree with you.When i purchased my 2021 Bolt i was told i could use it for 259 miles and that the battery problem was solved.Now i hear that the problem is not solved on 2021 model and that i will get a software update that will limit my range.I don't think the updated software for a 2021 will be soon.If i need full range for a road trip will i be able to use my car a 100% or will the new software prevent my from doing so?I also agree with you that we would be able to get compensation $$$ for the lost of range.When GM started to sell EUV they offered free type 2 charging to new customer.They should also think of using this to compensating existing users for the lost of range.
"If i need full range for a road trip will i be able to use my car a 100% or will the new software prevent my from doing so? "

My understanding is that with the newest software, you will only be able to charge to 80%. I'm intending to set my '21 Premier to only charge to 80%, and forego the software, in order to retain the ability to charge to 100%.

My parents live about 100 miles from me, via a freeway that routinely goes at 75-80 mi/hr, when it's not at 25 mi/hr. (For those familiar, I'm writing about the 55, 91 and 15 freeways in So. CA, from OC.) I need 100% to make that trip, with confidence.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Chevrolet Bolt
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
First, I generally don't recommend that people avoid a recall remedy, even an interim one. It's a safety recall, and even an interim remedy would reduce risk.

Having said that, getting a recall service performed is voluntary. There are posters on the forum who have stated that they plan to delay getting a new battery as long as possible so they can maximize the benefit of a new battery and warranty.

As I see it, each person has to make his/her own decision regarding risk and benefit.

Possible benefits:
  • Official recommendation to park inside, charge whenever and wherever, and drive down to 0% state of charge (may matter to your employer, your family and/or your own peace of mind)
  • Additional diagnostics that may detect a problem with your battery
  • Possibility of being prioritized for battery replacement if those diagnostics detect a problem
  • Battery replacement eligibility may expand quickly, so you may not be stuck with the limitation for long (GM has already started replacing 2018s, which implies they're no longer solely focused on the ~15,000 2019s with batteries made in Korea)
Possible risks:
  • Hard limit of 80% target charge level
  • You may already be comfortable parking inside and charging whenever and wherever you want
  • Diagnostic software may be too aggressive or have a false positive and disable your Bolt, compared to your own risk tolerance
  • Diagnostic software may be ineffective and not actually reduce risk
  • Battery replacement eligibility may expand slowly, so you would be stuck with the limitation for a long time
It's one's own individual choice whether or not to get the software update. We'd all like more information, but I would be surprised if GM releases any information about their risk assessments for various groups of Bolts. They're facing class action lawsuits and significant numbers of buyback requests - I doubt they will voluntarily add fuel to those "fires".

Personally, I plan to get the software update when it becomes available for my 2020. I'm already comfortable with parking inside and charging overnight, but I value having GM's official guidance support my actions, and being able to communicate that to people who might ask me about the Bolt and the recall.

My point to them would be that yet another advantage of an EV is that a software update can improve the safety of the electric drive and "fuel" system. That's not generally true for ICE vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Will older (2017-18) models come next on the assumption age is a contributing factor? What other factors might influence the timing of replacements? Will the new SW increase my chances of getting a new pack? Or will it defer my replacement timeline because I have a "good enough for now" solution?
2017-2018 do have a higher rate of fires than those with US-made batteries, so it would not be surprising that they are prioritized next.

If the next software has additional diagnostics that flag a fire-risky battery, it is likely that the car that gets flagged will then get moved up the list (like some non-2019 cars that were remedied in the first wave after having sat at dealers since July/August with P0BBD or similar "bad battery" codes from the May software that was the intended "final fix" in the first fire recall).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
Double ditto.

Not a firm date. Just approximate. Six months? A year? 18 months?

GM know the production rate and replacement rate. They should share some info.
They can, but the problem is that the production rate could slow due to shortages of components, supply chain shortages, equipment going down, labor problems, yield problems (higher than expected % of defects), manufacturing problems, discoveries of problems w/new batteries once they're in the field, etc.

They could share the current replacement rate but again, it could go up or down depending on the above and numerous other challenges (e.g. shipping logistics, where batteries are going/need to go vs. location of qualified dealers, etc.)
 

·
Registered
2017 Chevrolt Bolt EV
Joined
·
1,175 Posts
Absolutely will NOT be getting the lastest software update with the 80% limit...with weather in Minnesota already getting inot the teens over night and 30 during the day I am seeing 170 miles range ona 100% charge ..

I'll continue charging outside the gargae except when it Snows
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,501 Posts
What are the reasons for not discharging more than 70 miles?
To reduce the risk of the battery catching fire GM has recommended that people limit their maximum charge to 90% and to not drive the battery down below 70 miles of range without charging it back up again (which we interpret as no less than 30%).

GM is rolling out a new software patch (now available for 2019 Bolts, available soon for others) that will limit the maximum charge to 80% and remove the advice on running the battery down low. So instead of a 60% range (90% to 30%) you'll get 80% of your capacity (80% to 0%).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
To reduce the risk of the battery catching fire GM has recommended that people limit their maximum charge to 90% and to not drive the battery down below 70 miles of range without charging it back up again (which we interpret as no less than 30%).

GM is rolling out a new software patch (now available for 2019 Bolts, available soon for others) that will limit the maximum charge to 80% and remove the advice on running the battery down low. So instead of a 60% range (90% to 30%) you'll get 80% of your capacity (80% to 0%).
I understand the 80%, but why the 70 Miles, are they thinking it may get to hot charging from say 10% to 80%?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,501 Posts
I understand the 80%, but why the 70 Miles, are they thinking it may get to hot charging from say 10% to 80%?
My guess (and it's an uneducated one) is that at both extremes of the charge range the cells undergo some sort of mechanical or chemical stress that exacerbates the potential manufacturing defect and raises the probability of a thermal runaway.
 

·
Registered
"early" 2019 LT Slate Grey Metallic
Joined
·
190 Posts
My guess (and it's an uneducated one) is that at both extremes of the charge range the cells undergo some sort of mechanical or chemical stress that exacerbates the potential manufacturing defect and raises the probability of a thermal runaway.
Let me also speculate (aka uneducated guess) that they figure that the risk is higher between 80% and 90% than 0% to 30% and that their new "state-of-the-art" ;) analysis software will catch the odd "battery-about-to-burn" before it starts. They know they are walking on a fine line giving the owners a bit of breathing room for the colder months. Each new battery fire is one more nail in the coffin. If they are willing to do this, for sure they know something we don't (ha!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
My guess (and it's an uneducated one) is that at both extremes of the charge range the cells undergo some sort of mechanical or chemical stress that exacerbates the potential manufacturing defect and raises the probability of a thermal runaway.
That makes sense, maybe the update changes the rate of charge at the lower end. Mine is a 2022 EUV that I bought and two days later they quit selling them. My luck. Now the concierge calls me every other day to see if I have any questions and then tell me they have no solutions. I told them to call me when they have something to tell me other than they are working on the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,349 Posts
Deep discharging has been associated with risk of catching fire: Fire summary table
Yep, and remember that the Bolt has a 'priority charging' setting when on scheduled charging to get up to 40% immediately... probably points to the cells being most stable above 40% (to 60%?). General rule for the battery is to not leave the EV at high or low SOC for long periods of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I called the EV concierge today to see if I could find out where I am in line. I told him that I live in the north and am concerned about leaving my Bolt outside in cold/snow/ice. They answered very quickly--after pushing "1" he was right on! He could not tell me when I was "due" for the battery replacement, but he then double-checked the software and said it was available now, and if I had that installed, I could resume charging inside, and I could drain below 70 miles. The negative is that it reduces my charge max amount to 80%

To be honest, this is not a bit problem for me. I seldom have ever gone more than 150 miles or so on a charge. But I'm wondering if this is really the software that has been discussed before which reduces your charge, monitors the battery, and gradually (if it sees no problem) raises the maximum charge limit. I also wonder if upgrading the software moves me back in the battery replacement queue...Any thoughts? Anyone have any details from a GM service tech or something?

Another possibility for this software: Maybe it just changes the scale so that what used to be 90% is now called 80% and what used to be 70 miles is now called 0 miles?
FYI, I got a call from the GM EV Concierge yesterday to see whether I had made out ok getting the software update. I thought that was pretty good service.
 

·
Registered
2021 Bolt LT
Joined
·
185 Posts
Deep discharging has been associated with risk of catching fire: Fire summary table
Which I find concerning that they now say run it down, it's ok...
I have never been a fan of running lithium batteries dead. I have lost a couple of my 18v Ryobi batteries due to the fact that I either ran them dead and /or let them just sit too long at a low SOC.
In my lithium battery usage I have tried to keep what I "use" filled up, but not just let it sit that way too long.
 
21 - 40 of 43 Posts
Top