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The main use of this generator would be to power an AC, but even with a hardstart kit I dont know if this would be enough. But that question is probably best asked in a different placed.
If you are going to run an AC with a generator, get a soft start. It's decades ahead of what a hard start can do for you and removes not only all the harsh side effects of the hard start but adds protections that the hard start doesn't have. It doesn't stay in the circuit unless it's needed. It doesn't compromise torque that the hard start does. It compensates for low voltage, eliminates chattering, it prevents and detects motor reversal that is caused by momentary power outages. It also prevents out of delay startups. Send me a PM if you're interested, I just self-installed one last month.
 

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@Pike Bishop Thanks for the great post on generators. I agree. I'm running the Generac Guardian series and have charged my Bolt many times on it. As for back feeding, it is not illegal in many states as-is. And I mean backfeeding into the house. But, if you do not isolate your home from the grid, you could be civilly liable for the damage your actions cause. But unless a high degree of negligence AND intent can be proven, you aren't really in the criminal/justice system arena yet. You might end up there but to what end is a mystery to me. But plugging your generator into the home, back feeding it is not illegal in most states nor in mine. Do it 'correctly'. I use the term loosely because you could argue it really can't be done 'correctly. So maybe I'd reword it to; do it in such a fashion that you have mitigated as many risks and dangers as you can. Kill your main breaker as a minimum and if you are ambitious disconnect your neutral bond to the utility. And speaking of insurance, after you burn down the house and the neighborhood, your insurance company is still on the hook. A perfect example is a case I actually worked on and know quite well. An idiot was driving on I-94 in his truck with a friend. Saw deer in the field off the interstate. Pulled over on the Interstate. Pulled out the rifle, friend helped stabilize it, took the shot. Killed a guy driving opposite direction. The victim's family sued the auto-insurance carrier. They argued that they shouldn't be on the hook ..... they lost and paid out max benefit. Doing something stupid and illegal is the best time to have insurance. Ask the drunk drivers who hurt/kill people who pays out the claims.
 

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12KW should be sufficient for L2 charging. 11 hr run time at half load on gasoline more than enough for a full charge on the Bolt. 13.5 gal @ $3/gal = $40... about twice the price of DC fast charge. But when you're on a long trip through places without 240v source, this would have to do. 5% THD too. Mount this on a small trailer on the Bolt hitch and you're good to go with your own range extender.
 

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@Pike Bishop Thanks for the great post on generators. I agree. I'm running the Generac Guardian series and have charged my Bolt many times on it. As for back feeding, it is not illegal in many states as-is. And I mean backfeeding into the house. But, if you do not isolate your home from the grid, you could be civilly liable for the damage your actions cause. But unless a high degree of negligence AND intent can be proven, you aren't really in the criminal/justice system arena yet. You might end up there but to what end is a mystery to me. But plugging your generator into the home, back feeding it is not illegal in most states nor in mine. Do it 'correctly'. I use the term loosely because you could argue it really can't be done 'correctly. So maybe I'd reword it to; do it in such a fashion that you have mitigated as many risks and dangers as you can. Kill your main breaker as a minimum and if you are ambitious disconnect your neutral bond to the utility. And speaking of insurance, after you burn down the house and the neighborhood, your insurance company is still on the hook. A perfect example is a case I actually worked on and know quite well. An idiot was driving on I-94 in his truck with a friend. Saw deer in the field off the interstate. Pulled over on the Interstate. Pulled out the rifle, friend helped stabilize it, took the shot. Killed a guy driving opposite direction. The victim's family sued the auto-insurance carrier. They argued that they shouldn't be on the hook ..... they lost and paid out max benefit. Doing something stupid and illegal is the best time to have insurance. Ask the drunk drivers who hurt/kill people who pays out the claims.
I stand corrected. You are right, backfeeding to a panel is permitted for "optional standby generating equipment" defined by NEC 720.5, which also indicates the direction for doing it correctly.

NEC 720 has been under constant revision since 2010 due to the increasing number of solar installations. I have seen our area's solar installation be approved, rejected, and finally reapproved as the NEC evolved.

I have a Generac Guardian 22kW. It is classified by NEC 720.5 (and our local building department) as: “systems intended to supply power to public or private facilities or property where life safety does not depend on the performance of the system. Optional standby systems are intended to supply on-site generated power to selected loads either automatically or manually.”

Doing it right under NEC 720 means using an interlock, a device that makes the operation of two power systems mutually dependent. That means the generator can only feed if the house is disconnected from the grid, and vice-versa. The rock-solid way of mitigating risks, as you said, is to use an interlock.

The good thing about interlocks is that they are cheap. When I bought our Generac, our contractor practically received the Generac automatic transfer switch for $100 dollars more. Manual systems are even less costly; walking-beam panel switches are about $50. (We have these on our rental properties; if we are not present the tenant can connect their generator to code.)



You are correct that there are no prohibitory laws regarding non-interlocked backfeeding i.e.--it shall be illegal to use a temporary generator without a fixed interlock system. However, if you check with your local building department, there will be a code reference to NEC or NFPA that a homeowner will be required to follow.

If you ignore your local code, you now walk into the legal area of negligence which has well established definitions and clear liabilities. For $50 it's not worth trying to prove that you always disconnected the main breaker.

Some good white-papers on the subject.
https://iaeimagazine.org/magazine/2009/07/16/transfer-equipment-used-in-optional-standby-systems-for-commercial-applications-part-ii-transfer-equipment-options/ Pretty straight forward.

https://download.schneider-electric.com/files?p_enDocType=White+Paper&p_File_Name=asc-ts-wp-nec-requirements.pdf&p_Doc_Ref=TS-WP-NECREQ more towards life-safety installations, but the interlock diagrams are wholly applicable.
 

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I should have mentioned I'm going to be using an interlock, or transfer switch.. not sure which yet is why I didnt mention it before. Still planning.
 

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@Pike Bishop Thanks for the additional information. I was just trying to address the criminal aspect. I've worked in Law Enforcement for 30 years and also have the 22kW Guardian, self installed with ATS. A local community just had a 2 day outage due to a storm, the news showed all the retail establishments selling out of generators, lots of generators. I live under 20 miles from where my generator was built, picked it up from the plant. I just wanted to address the criminal aspect. As for negligence in this topic, that's a civil matter and negligence is a very slippery slope, not as easy to prove or determine as most people believe. But I'm ok with that, as I have insurance thankfully. I'll pay my deductible and if the payout goes beyond max coverage, I'll claim bankruptcy ..... 'Merica. I don't backfeed, but if I did, I would pull the main and go for it. It's an important topic because putting in an interlock is something that takes a bit of planning, and a permit if you actually get one (Wonder how many EVSE's are installed without a permit). During an outage, for those that didn't plan ahead, they neither have the time nor the luxury of putting an interlock in, no matter how smart it is. I respect the notion that they shouldn't backfeed unless done to the letter of the guidelines in the NEC/NFPA which most but not all states have adopted into their state electrical code. What is 'code' one year may not be the next as you pointed out.... I just roll my eyes and throw up in my mouth when I hear the doom and gloom of legal threats and negligence in something that isn't either in most cases. Doing stupid things earns many people stupid prizes and that's life. I honestly believe there isn't a neighborhood that doesn't have one generator setup to backfeed and does it as needed. I hope that person puts reasonable care (which negates negligence) into doing it as safely as they can, with or without a lockout.
 
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