Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I can't do anything with my bolt and haven't been able to for 21 days now as it's been in the shop. For the whole story visit my new facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/donotbuyachevybolt/

But if you don't want to click on the link I'll give the short version. I got a check engine light and ended up not making it home. Car was towed in and 21 days later with multiple calls between the Chevy Service Department and GM Engineers they've tried two repairs - neither of which have worked.

All GM will tell me is that they are sure they'll be able to get it fixed. They've had my car totally apart three times now.

If you are reading this you probably already own a Bolt. And the whole 50 days that I owned mine and it worked I loved it. But I can wholeheartedly say I don't love it now and the customer servcie from GM has been beyond bad. My new mantra is simply, DON'T BUY A BOLT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
At least GM does their best to release a completed car, Tesla uses their customers as beta testers.

I'll guess your problem is a software bug rather than a lemon. The concept of a lemon car doesn't really apply to electric cars like it did do ICE. Excepting if your battery pack is fundamentally faulty, as it was for some of those early Bolts. But these cars are so simple comparatively, the most complicated part is the software. This is really a different area for the industry (certainly for GM), they have to re-gear themselves to be as much a software company as a hardware company. My company went through that, old habits die hard. I'll guess that that's what you're dealing with - they're used to dealing with mechanical defects, their system is designed for that. But a software bug, that only is showing up on one car? That's different. They're trying to fix it with new parts, instead of finding the one line of code in millions that is getting upset at some particular condition of your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
i think three repair attempts justify a replacement car thanks to the lemon law. If you have proof that they took apart your car three times, all the better for you if a claim is made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
OP- are you looking for a refund, or a replacement brand new Bolt?

IMO- it should be up to you at this point, not up to corporate GM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,790 Posts
At least GM does their best to release a completed car, Tesla uses their customers as beta testers.

I'll guess your problem is a software bug rather than a lemon. The concept of a lemon car doesn't really apply to electric cars like it did do ICE. Excepting if your battery pack is fundamentally faulty, as it was for some of those early Bolts. But these cars are so simple comparatively, the most complicated part is the software.
I doubt it's software, as others would be having the same issue.

Well written programs can be easier to diagnose than hardware problems if proper error logs are built in. Heck, troubleshooting faulty mechanical problems has become way simpler now that OBDII reports various parameters and errors.

Perhaps this car is one of those few early ones with a faulty battery?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,564 Posts
Sorry to hear of your troubles. If they can't return your car to you in fully functioning condition in the next seven days, you qualify for the California Lemon Law. 30 days out of service is the magic number. You will need a lawyer as they will fight it. As of now, you do not qualify.

You've probably heard the old saying- "Never buy the first year "A" model of anything." Well, you, I and most the people posting here did not heed that warning because I guess we're just like that I suppose. Some of us sadly are now coming to understand the meaning of this old rubric. When I bought my Bolt I knew there was a very high probability that I would have problems with it and I still do. It's part of being an early adopter.

The problem with an electric car from a manufacturer that has done nothing but build ICE powered cars for the last 100 years, is there is a big learning curve. As another poster has pointed out, the car of the future is as much software as it is hardware and as anyone who has bought a personal computer, or smart phone can tell you, sometimes they can leave the "geniuses" and IT guys scratching their heads, muttering to themselves- "I've never seen this before..."

Life is no better for the brand new electric car manufacturers that have only been making electric cars for about ten years. They have the same headaches and problems, however they can focus more energy on your individual problem simply because they have service centers that know nothing but the one product and also they only have maybe a couple hundred thousand units in the field versus literally millions upon millions. Still, there are also internet tales of woe if you look over in Teslatown too. All part of being an early adopter.

I would have suggested patience, understanding and just wait out the 30 days. If they really do fix it and get it on the road in less than that, then great! You're back in business. I would also expect them to cover the loaner, or rental car and give you some compensation for the gas. The later I would only expect if you kept on good terms. I don't think I would have gone on the public warpath.

I think we get too used to retail outlets like Costco. If there's a problem, they take it back, they switch it out and you get a do over. The car industry has never been that way and they likely never will be. I know of no car company that will simply hand you another brand new car in exchange. They will always fix the car and give it back to you. Even under the Lemon Law Act they will likely just buy you out if forced to.

Anyhow, again I'm sorry to hear of the troubles and good luck with your fight. I hope you can find some peace somehow in the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I doubt it's software, as others would be having the same issue.
Common misconception, software is not deterministic, and hardware/firmware systems are notoriously finicky with regards to the firmware. God I deal with this every day, we have one <machine> which displays a problem that no other does. It's not the hardware, that passed hardware tests and is within spec. But it turns out that this particular machine has some characteristics that activate in combination with some conditions such that it behaves a little differently than the norm, and the software isn't capable of dealing with that because it was never considered. Algorithmic programming is inherently linear thinking.

Well written programs can be easier to diagnose than hardware problems if proper error logs are built in.
How I wish it was that simple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
You've probably heard the old saying- "Never buy the first year "A" model of anything." Well, you, I and most the people posting here did not heed that warning because I guess we're just like that I suppose. Some of us sadly are now coming to understand the meaning of this old rubric. When I bought my Bolt I knew there was a very high probability that I would have problems with it and I still do. It's part of being an early adopter.
I grew up with multiple GM/UAW employees in the family, and avoiding a first-year GM product was part of the conventional wisdom, even as we all drove mostly GM cars. I took a chance with the Spark EV, leasing one of the first 400 made, and it was flawless for 3 years, and my second one has been flawless for a year now, which made me more comfortable getting a first-year Bolt. I'll admit that the greater integration of LG parts and tech into the car does concern me, but so far the consensus seems to be that the Bolt is pretty good.

Sorry the OP has had such major problems. Hopefully this can be resolved, but I know how this type of thing can shake your confidence in a car. I finally made the move to the Bolt because I was tired of the recurring failures in my last gas car, so when I got it showing no check engine light, I traded it in. I imagine you'd be happiest with a quick lemon-law result that gets you into a different car.


2016 Spark EV
2017 Bolt EV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I grew up with multiple GM/UAW employees in the family, and avoiding a first-year GM product was part of the conventional wisdom, even as we all drove mostly GM cars. I took a chance with the Spark EV, leasing one of the first 400 made, and it was flawless for 3 years, and my second one has been flawless for a year now, which made me more comfortable getting a first-year Bolt. I'll admit that the greater integration of LG parts and tech into the car does concern me, but so far the consensus seems to be that the Bolt is pretty good.
Without looking deeper into the tear down analysis, the biggest component mfg in the Bolt is LG (power and control), second appears to be Bosch (braking, steering?, control and intelligence) and third is GM with the engine design (the enging fabrication is LG in Korea I believe), body stamping and chassis. Really GM wisely used their expertise at the top level design and product creation, and bought components and expertise from at least two other major 1st tier manufacturers. Also considering GM's long history with EV's (yes the EV1) and the relative simplicity of an EV I think buying first gen isn't too crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,790 Posts
Did the dealership provide a rental vehicle in the meantime?

The Bolt is the first Chevy product that I have considered purchasing as a first model year. Since electric drivetrains are simple in comparison with ICE, I'm more comfortable that it will hold up well after the warranty expires. That said, there might be minor updates in successive years based on lessons learned from the first model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Sorry to hear of your troubles.

As long as GM gives you a free loaner, then I would think that would be OK. While I understand your dilemma, I question the wisdom of your facebook post.

As other members have stated, EV's have a learning curve. 3 to 4 weeks in the shop is longer than normal...but stating that "no one should buy one" does a huge disservice to the rest of us and the movement in general.

If you plan on buying a Tesla next you better keep the video camera warm because it will not be long...

Furthermore, you are making statements that encompass far more than your car. Are you the only person that has had a car in the shop for 3 weeks? If it makes you feel any better I had my Toyota Camry Hybrid in the shop for 2 weeks with a known problem! They knew what was wrong 2 hours after it went in. They didn't pay for a loaner or anything else for that matter. I got a $1000 bill + $300 fee for the rental from Toyota...and I still think Toyota makes a good car.

The point is all manufacturers have issues, not just GM. Luckily yours is under warranty...and they are working on it. Jumping to facebook to "advertise" your issue is not only self serving...it is just plain stupid.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top