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https://www.cars.com/articles/2017-c...1420692448232/

The Cars.com reviewer didn't seem to love the seats (maybe he's a big boy? Who knows). Obese people won't like the Bolt's seats....check.

New tidbit is the "Hilltop Reserve" mode. If you live on a hill, activating this feature (either one time or automatically by location/GPS), it will only charge the Bolt to 90%. Good for people living on top of a hill, but useful for all of us! This feature basically allows anyone to automatically limit charging to 90%! People worried about battery longevity now have an easy way to prevent 100% charging without having to time when to pull the plug!

The Bolt EV also has Hilltop Reserve, which is not an artisanal wine. It's an innovation intended for people who charge their Bolt with the expectation of sustained downhill driving afterward. It charges the battery pack to 90 rather than 100 percent capacity. The reason is that a full battery can't capture any additional regeneration. By leaving that 10 percent open, you work toward filling it for free by driving downhill where you otherwise would have paid to charge it via cord. Owners can program the car to activate this feature once or automatically only in a particular location, such as at home, work or both.
 

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The article mention something that few Tesla Motor fans have realized. Since TM has sold more EVs than GM, their 200,000 unit allocation of the tax rebate will end sooner for them than for GM. GM can sell over 100,000 Chevy Bolt EVs and Volts before it ends for them. TM has passed the 100,000 mark sooner, and will probably reach the 200,000 unit limit before the Model 3 is sold, because TM is still offering the upgraded Model S 60 kWH/75 kWh versions for sale. Many of those buyers will prefer this Model S instead of waiting for the Model 3.

Therefore, no one buying the model 3 will get the full $7,500.00 tax rebate. They will be in the phase-out stage by 2018 and get just $3,500.00 or even less. By that time, the 2017 and future 2018 Chevy Bolt EV will still be a better buy than the Model 3!
 

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The article mention something that few Tesla Motor fans have realized. Since TM has sold more EVs than GM, their 200,000 unit allocation of the tax rebate will end sooner for them than for GM. GM can sell over 100,000 Chevy Bolt EVs and Volts before it ends for them. TM has passed the 100,000 mark sooner, and will probably reach the 200,000 unit limit before the Model 3 is sold, because TM is still offering the upgraded Model S 60 kWH/75 kWh versions for sale. Many of those buyers will prefer this Model S instead of waiting for the Model 3.

Therefore, no one buying the model 3 will get the full $7,500.00 tax rebate. They will be in the phase-out stage by 2018 and get just $3,500.00 or even less. By that time, the 2017 and future 2018 Chevy Bolt EV will still be a better buy than the Model 3!
Right, well, GM has sold over 110,000 units between the Volt and the Spark EV, so there are not that many full rebates left for the Bolt, either - I'd guess the first two production years at the very most (remembering that the Volt will still be sold alongside the Bolt).
 

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Where I live is relatively flat, so that downhill regen feature is all but wasted on me. I can see it being very useful in a city like San Fran. As for those seats, apparently they're thin with less cushioning and springs. Won't really know how they feel to me until I sit inn one.
 

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Hilltop Reserve is a good end run around the regulation that reduces the range claims to the recommended charge level. That is why the LEAF removed their 80% charge setting as the Feds made them reduce their range claims as Nissan recommended that setting for daily use.

I will use Hilltop Reserve as the default everywhere and only GM will know the secret: everyone should use this setting to have their batteries last longest.
 

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You guys think that if Hillary was president that we would see more of a push for EV's to be on the road, meaning an increase of rebates in this case? Trump doesn't seem too supportive of it, at least now.
 

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I will use Hilltop Reserve as the default everywhere and only GM will know the secret: everyone should use this setting to have their batteries last longest.
By lasting the longest, are you referring to how long a single charge last or the lifespan of a battery? I'm all for increasing a battery's lifespan with minimal range loss.
 

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By lasting the longest, are you referring to how long a single charge last or the lifespan of a battery? I'm all for increasing a battery's lifespan with minimal range loss.
The latter. While it's unlikely that the pack actually charges to a full 100%, the more below full it is while sitting unused, the better it is for the pack. I have a 2013 leaf, and charge it to 80% unless I need the full range, in which case I top it off to 100% right before driving it.
 

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You guys think that if Hillary was president that we would see more of a push for EV's to be on the road, meaning an increase of rebates in this case? Trump doesn't seem too supportive of it, at least now.
If the Trump administration was to eliminate the $7500 Federal tax credit, which is possible given his views about global warming, the environment and the individual who will oversee the EPA, it will cause havoc on EV sales. While I am very much looking forward to taking delivery of my loaded Bolt Premiere (hopefully before Jan. 1st), there is no way I'm going to go through with the purchase if I have to pay about $45K for the car out the door.
 

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If the Trump administration was to eliminate the $7500 Federal tax credit, which is possible given his views about global warming, the environment and the individual who will oversee the EPA, it will cause havoc on EV sales. While I am very much looking forward to taking delivery of my loaded Bolt Premiere (hopefully before Jan. 1st), there is no way I'm going to go through with the purchase if I have to pay about $45K for the car out the door.
I don't see how you can avoid paying $45K out the door unless you lease. The tax credit doesn't reduce your out the door cost at the time of purchase. It does, however, free up $7500 of tax liability. If you take out a loan for the car, you could use the $7500 worth of taxes you don't have to pay and apply it to the loan principal, cutting your time on the loan, or reducing the payment amount.

Trump and a Republican controlled congress aren't likely to eliminate the tax credit before you or I get our Bolts, especially if we get them in late December of this year.
 

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The latter. While it's unlikely that the pack actually charges to a full 100%, the more below full it is while sitting unused, the better it is for the pack. I have a 2013 leaf, and charge it to 80% unless I need the full range, in which case I top it off to 100% right before driving it.
Did not know that doing so would prolong a battery's life. May need to take you advice if I decide to outright buy the Bolt. wouldn't care so much if I was leasing the vehicle since you return it after a certain amount of years.
 

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I'll definitely be going the lease route because of this. Especially with the range dropping every year of course due to wear and what not, I'd rather be able to get another one, potentially an upgraded version down the line, without having to worry about these things.
 

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Just make sure that the time you decide to return it there won`t be any expensive servicing required since I believe in most cases you are responsible for that in order for them to sell the vehicle.
 

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Just make sure that the time you decide to return it there won`t be any expensive servicing required since I believe in most cases you are responsible for that in order for them to sell the vehicle.
Typical EV service is:
  • Rotate the tires every 7500 miles
  • Cabin Air Filter every 15K
Might need wiper blades?
Brakes will be good and even the tires will likely be serviceable at that point.

Anything else should be under warranty - 3/36 bumper to bumper.
 

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Did not know that doing so would prolong a battery's life. May need to take you advice if I decide to outright buy the Bolt. wouldn't care so much if I was leasing the vehicle since you return it after a certain amount of years.
The latter. While it's unlikely that the pack actually charges to a full 100%, the more below full it is while sitting unused, the better it is for the pack. I have a 2013 leaf, and charge it to 80% unless I need the full range, in which case I top it off to 100% right before driving it.
Well, here's some additional real world experience. I've had my 2013 Nissan Leaf for 3 1/2+ years and drive around 10K miles per year and carefully monitor battery capacity. I live in temperate Northern California. I charge it every night to 100% (on off-peak rates). I would estimate that I have lost no more than 5% of battery capacity (estimated range has gone down from 88-90 miles to 85-88 miles.

I know that the chemistry of the batteries is such that their best operating range is to be charged between 20%-80% of their capacity, but the CEO of Nissan said upon the Leaf's introduction that charging it all the way up of letting it discharge all the way down would only have a minor impact on battery capacity life hardly noticeable by consumers. That certainly has been my real world experience.

So I would urge folks to be happy-don't worry!
 

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The issue isn't with charging to 100% before you use the car. It's charging to 100% and then letting it sit, unused, for long periods. If you finish charging within a few hours of using it, then you aren't doing anything to harm the pack significantly.
 

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At least with the Hilltop Reserve mode on, you won't have to keep track of how much it charges, just set it up and forget it. Guess I really won't know much about battery capacity loss over time until I've driven one for a few years.
 

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Just make sure that the time you decide to return it there won`t be any expensive servicing required since I believe in most cases you are responsible for that in order for them to sell the vehicle.
I did not know this, this is going to be my first lease so that's definitely something to keep in mind. Thanks !
 

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I understand the battery chemistry issue, but I think I'd get more use out of the hilltop reserve if it were a nice red. Seems more like a marketing and way of pre-excusing them from long term battery issues. Exactly how high of a hill does one have to live on to charge the battery up that last 10 percent?? Seems like a very long hill!
 

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I understand the battery chemistry issue, but I think I'd get more use out of the hilltop reserve if it were a nice red. Seems more like a marketing and way of pre-excusing them from long term battery issues. Exactly how high of a hill does one have to live on to charge the battery up that last 10 percent?? Seems like a very long hill!
If we assume 60 kWh usable, that's a 6 kWh buffer with the hilltop reserve setting active. You'd have to live on top of one helluva hill to actually regen 6 kWh of charge. :p

I really think the "hilltop reserve" feature was really more of a way for GM to offer a simple way for owners to not charge to 100% (and avoid having to blend the range of 90% and 100% that the EPA requires if they offered 2 charge settings). With this "optional" feature, GM can stick with the 100% 238 EPA range. :)
 
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