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When replacing the cabin air filter behind the glove box by yourself, I've seen one video where the damper or shock absorber is removed by sliding it out to the left. Has anyone tried this? The other 2 videos show it being removed from the bottom of the glove box. Then they struggle getting it back in. Thanks
 

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When replacing the cabin air filter behind the glove box by yourself, I've seen one video where the damper or shock absorber is removed by sliding it out to the left. Has anyone tried this? The other 2 videos show it being removed from the bottom of the glove box. Then they struggle getting it back in. Thanks
I just did this a couple of weeks ago. The damper pops out to the right. All you need is a screwdriver to undo (and redo) the lock that keeps the arm in place.
 

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I just did the one in my wife's Buick a couple days ago, uses the same shock absorber. It's a simple plastic locking hook. Needs to be compressed a little to unhook and then snaps in relatively easy as long as the hole is squared up to the lock. If its like my wife's Buick, compressing the bottom of the lock is easier than the top.
 

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I just did the one in my wife's Buick a couple days ago, uses the same shock absorber. It's a simple plastic locking hook. Needs to be compressed a little to unhook and then snaps in relatively easy as long as the hole is squared up to the lock. If its like my wife's Buick, compressing the bottom of the lock is easier than the top.
You're absolutely right. It's the bottom half of the lock that has the hook part of the mechanism, if I remember correctly.
 

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One of those videos was probably mine. While I had a difficult time the first time I replaced it ....I had a very easy time of it the second time around. It snapped right back on for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
On 2 other Bolt groups, they show the TOP of the damper easily slides out to the LEFT and slides back in to the RIGHT to put it back. The whole procedure should take 5 minutes. There is no need to struggle taking the damper off of the glove compartment and putting it back. It's simply slides off at the top, not the bottom
 

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From what I've gathered, what's the point of changing the filter if it doesn't filter out exterior odors?
There's another thread about carbon whatever filters but it seems inconclusive on effectiveness.
 

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I started reading this and I just about died picturing what would be next after removing the wheel and shock assembly,

Oh, the little shock for the glovebox ?
 

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On 2 other Bolt groups, they show the TOP of the damper easily slides out to the LEFT and slides back in to the RIGHT to put it back. The whole procedure should take 5 minutes. There is no need to struggle taking the damper off of the glove compartment and putting it back. It's simply slides off at the top, not the bottom
Did the filter change this way last weekend. 5 minutes for the whole job. There are two loops on the shock. The bottom loop is the one that slides over the stud.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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From what I've gathered, what's the point of changing the filter if it doesn't filter out exterior odors?
There's another thread about carbon whatever filters but it seems inconclusive on effectiveness.
Just purchased a new carbon filter and was surprised how much dirt accumulated in the one was that I replaced (after only 2 years of use). The carbon doesn't seem to impede the air flow, so you might as well use the carbon filter. Easy enough to do every couple of years. Well worth the 14 bucks.
I'm using a 3M activated carbon filter on my Bolt EV and it does cut down on the odour for around first couple thousands of km or so. After that it's sort of like the OEM filter. I change my filter every 10,000km (6,200 miles), which equates to about every 4 to 5 months for my driving pattern. It gets fairly dusty when it's time to switch out, as I've posted on my daily cartoon:
So I would imagine that it'd be pretty gnarly if I left one in for two years.
 

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I'm using a 3M activated carbon filter on my Bolt EV and it does cut down on the odour for around first couple thousands of km or so. After that it's sort of like the OEM filter. I change my filter every 10,000km (6,200 miles), which equates to about every 4 to 5 months for my driving pattern. It gets fairly dusty when it's time to switch out, as I've posted on my daily cartoon:
So I would imagine that it'd be pretty gnarly if I left one in for two years.
I'm using a 3M activated carbon filter on my Bolt EV and it does cut down on the odour for around first couple thousands of km or so. After that it's sort of like the OEM filter. I change my filter every 10,000km (6,200 miles), which equates to about every 4 to 5 months for my driving pattern. It gets fairly dusty when it's time to switch out, as I've posted on my daily cartoon:
So I would imagine that it'd be pretty gnarly if I left one in for two years.
I just got the car recently. It now has about 33,000 miles, so I don't know how many times it was changed before I had purchased it. I will defintely change it much more often now thay I am aware of how easy it is and how cheap the replacement filter cost to change out.
 
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I just did this a couple of weeks ago. The damper pops out to the right. All you need is a screwdriver to undo (and redo) the lock that keeps the arm in place.
Indeed just an easy task
 

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When replacing the cabin air filter behind the glove box by yourself, I've seen one video where the damper or shock absorber is removed by sliding it out to the left. Has anyone tried this? The other 2 videos show it being removed from the bottom of the glove box. Then they struggle getting it back in. Thanks
Yes! I just did the replacement without using any tools, not even a screwdriver. The video that "got it right" is here:

In that video, the guy simply pushes the cylinder to the left, and it pops free, so you really don't see what was holding it in the first place. But after it pops free, when you're doing it yourself, you can see that there are two loops on the cylinder, and a stationary pinchable bracket on the lower right side of the glovebox cavity (similar to the OTHER pinchable bracket holding the bottom of the cylinder that all the other videos struggled with). I found it was easy, after replacing the filter, to just slide the lower of the two loops (the one that causes you to telescope/extend the cylinder further) onto that stationary pinchable bracket. It would be hard to photograph but I'm willing to try if other folks are confused.
 

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Wow! I didn’t know that upper part of it slides out so easily! I must try this next time. Still considering going this route for the speaker harness taps for future amp installation.

Thanks for the find and for sharing. No more fiddling with the screwdriver and wrecking the lock tab on the bottom part of the damper. Thanks again.
 

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Yes! I just did the replacement without using any tools, not even a screwdriver. The video that "got it right" is here:

In that video, the guy simply pushes the cylinder to the left, and it pops free, so you really don't see what was holding it in the first place. But after it pops free, when you're doing it yourself, you can see that there are two loops on the cylinder, and a stationary pinchable bracket on the lower right side of the glovebox cavity (similar to the OTHER pinchable bracket holding the bottom of the cylinder that all the other videos struggled with). I found it was easy, after replacing the filter, to just slide the lower of the two loops (the one that causes you to telescope/extend the cylinder further) onto that stationary pinchable bracket. It would be hard to photograph but I'm willing to try if other folks are confused.
I know this is an old post but a picture would be very handy. Thanks.
 

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I changed mine a few weeks ago. It wasn't that difficult. I've read that people recommend using a flathead, but a philips head screwdriver actually worked better for me when reinserting the lower clip.
 
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